127 Slide Film

Discussion in 'Product Availability' started by battra92, Apr 4, 2006.

  1. battra92

    battra92 Member

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    I was wondering if there is any avaliable 127 slide film for use in super slides. I started to shoot 127 slides when just as I secured a large new old stock supply of cardboard superslide mounts Macochrome was discontinued.

    I was wondering if there are any viable alternatives out there in 127 size. Should I just build a film slitter to cut down 120 film and put it on old 127 spools?
     
  2. battra92

    battra92 Member

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    Bleh, no one said it was cheap. Guess I'll be building a film slitter to cut down 120.
     
  3. BradS

    BradS Subscriber

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    Geez, at $11-12 per roll, I guess you could pay for a slitter pretty quickly!
     
  4. Donald Qualls

    Donald Qualls Member

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    If you have 127 spools available, this is a very viable alternative, at least for 4x4. However -- you have to reverse spool the film to get the 6x4.5 framing track under the 127 camera's 4x4 window. What I've done (once, so far, but it went smoothly) is to cut the film in daylight, using a sharp knife (I used a snap-blade utility knife with about three inches of blade extended); cut the roll down to the core, smoothly and evenly on the side that preserves the 6x4.5 framing track (the leftover, BTW, is just right to feed a 16 mm camera that doesn't require perforations, though it's too long for a Minolta 16 -- it's just right for a Kiev 30 or 303, though). Then go into the darkroom to respool directly to the 127 spool; I folded the leader back and cut it to half length, then rolled it back up, turned the lights back on, and trimmed the point on the end. Back in the dark, when you come to the head-end paster, untape the film (I peeled the tape from the film and stuck it back on the backing) and just slip the film head into the roll the way you would with the tail when respooling to 620. Spool normally until you come to the tail, which needs to be taped to the backing (a little tricky to do in the dark, but not too bad); I'd suggest leaving this end full length, since I found when loading a full-frame 127 that it was hard to do with the tail (now the head) trimmed. The film will show "Exposed" on the outside when you load it, and the numbers will count backward, but it works.

    Bonus: You'll get 16 frames of 4x4 with extra space between, or 12 frames of 4x6.5 with either almost no space between, or a couple mm of overlap (haven't finished that test roll yet). If you have a half-frame camera, be sure to have lots of subjects for that 24 exposure roll...
     
  5. Fotohuis

    Fotohuis Member

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    If I want to have super slides, I am simply using my M645 pro and SS. cutter.
    Simple: You can use every E-6 film (on 120 rollfilm), you have the right frame in the finder and at the end it's much cheaper.

    best regards,

    Robert
     
  6. Donald Qualls

    Donald Qualls Member

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    That's a very valid method if you have a 645 (or even a 6x6), though if you don't have the 4x4 framing lines in the viewfinder composition is a little haphazard.

    If you have a 127 4x4 camera, OTOH, cutting down 120 size E-6 stock is now the only viable option to shoot Super Slides. It's more work than respooling 120 to 620, but not significantly worse than slitting film to reload Minox or Minolta 16 cassettes, and as a bonus you get more exposures per roll than with the original film.