14-year-expired Ektachrome 200?

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by Stevopedia, Apr 29, 2008.

  1. Stevopedia

    Stevopedia Member

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    Hello everyone,

    I recently dug up a small box of vintage Ektachrome, all dated between 1990 and 1994, and with speeds between 50 and 200. I'd guess that there are 10-15 rolls of it. It probably hasn't been refrigerated ever. What kind of results could I expect if I shot and processed it?

    Most of the rolls are still in the original packaging. They are the European version, made in the UK by Kodak Limited and with markings in English, French, German, Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese. If it's not worth shooting, I'll just keep it for the historical value. (There must be collectors and museums for such things, right?)

    Also, does anyone know of any places in the Baltimore, Maryland area that processes E-6? I don't have the supplies/chemistry/money to do it myself, or else I would.

    -Stephen

    By the way, I did shoot a roll, and had it processed at my friendly local Walgreen's... and they processed it as C-41! If I want my slides cross-processed, I know where to go now... :tongue: In retrospect, though, it makes sense--the average person who gets their film done there won't be shooting transparencies.
     
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  2. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    Try it you may love the horrific colour shifts.

    But then compared to US color TV the colour may not seem quite as bad :D

    Ian
     
  3. Stevopedia

    Stevopedia Member

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    Well, the cross-processed roll doesn't look half bad! :smile:

    What surprised me the most about it was that the negatives are a very dark and vivid shade of green. It's surprising that the prints have any color in them at all, funky blue-green cast they have or no... :rolleyes: They're also extra-grainy. It's actually a pretty cool effect.

    EDIT: I was looking at the prints just now, and it turns out that what I thought was funky-looking grain is actually an obscene amount of digital noise that came from the printing machines at the one hour photo, not any fault of the film.
     
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  4. srmcnamara

    srmcnamara Member

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    Dodge Color in Silver Spring if that's not too far

    I know dodge color in silver spring does a good job, I don't know of any up in baltimore but it would certainly be a good thing to know since I go to school here now.
     
  5. Charlie-J

    Charlie-J Member

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