15 year old exposed C41

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by PeteZ8, Jun 27, 2009.

  1. PeteZ8

    PeteZ8 Member

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    I stumbled upon about 8 rolls of C41 film that was probably shot in the mid 90's. Anything special I should do develping this? Longer development time? Shorter? Fix longer?

    I'm using one of the 3 part "press kits" with developer/blix/stab. The kit is from Jobo although I'm sure they are all pretty much the same.

    I've done a few rolls already all are drying. One came out looking perfect the other two are extremely muddy although some of that will clear up during drying I'm sure.

    Storage was room temperature, in a ziplock bag, in a drawer.
     
  2. Alex Bishop-Thorpe

    Alex Bishop-Thorpe Member

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    I recently found 40 rolls of unexposed film from the early 90's - film my mother had shot and never processed. We're talking Kodak Gold III, and cartridges that even had rust on them - I took them to my lab, and the vast majority turned out fine. They didn't make any special compensation, but the negs look good. They were kept in similar conditions and survived australian summers in a tin house. I'd suggest colour film has better keeping properties than you'd generally expect.

    Also, my response was entirely unhelpful.
     
  3. J Rollinger

    J Rollinger Member

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    I recently bought a Rolleiflex 4x4 that had a roll of Kodak Gold in it so i developed it and the neg's came out good. I emailed the scans to the seller and he told me the roll was from a trip in 1992. (17 year old exposed film)
     
  4. glbeas

    glbeas Member

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    Amatuer film is sold way before the peak aging for that very reason. Professional film will suffer much more quickly because it has been aged to the perfect color balance, etc, before releasing to the buyers for more predictable results.