1st Box...

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by ChristopherCoy, Nov 13, 2012.

  1. ChristopherCoy

    ChristopherCoy Member

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    I'm a Tri-X shooter for 35mm and 120 (for now), but I need some 4x5 stuff and I'm about to purchase my first box. I 'want to purchase a large box, so I'm looking at 25 sheet boxes. I'm also looking at 100-200 ISO films since I'm limited to 1/200th on my Speed Graphic's lens, and I don't trust the focal plane shutter right now, and I don't have any ND filters.

    Can anyone explain the difference between FP4 and Delta 100? One is ISO125 and the other is ISO100, and both of their descriptions sound very similar.

    Delta 100-
    Ilford Delta 100 Professional is simply the best in its class - offering the photographer exceptionally fine grain and a level of sharpness rarely seen, resulting in outstanding clarity of detail and the most precise image rendition. Capable of superb image quality at its recommended rating of ISO 100/21, this film will also produce great results rated between ISO 50 and 200.

    FP4-
    Ilford FP4 Plus is a very fine grain, outstanding sharpness and high acutance make it the film of choice whenever a job demands great enlargement or the subject contains a wealth of fine detail. Nominally rated at ISO 125, Ilford FP4 Plus has become the benchmark against which other medium speed films are judged. With enormous latitude for exposure error above and below its ISO 125, Ilford FP4 Plus is very suitable for most photographic subjects under a variety of lighting conditions.
     
  2. Neal

    Neal Subscriber

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    Dear Christopher,

    Delta 100 is a newer technology film making it, IMO, smoother and sharper than FP4+. FP4+ will give you a more traditional look. A sort of comparison would be between Plus-X and TMax 100. I have a personal love of Delta 100, but we all have slightly different tastes and either will make a ridiculously good 11x14.

    You can't go wrong with only a 25 sheet box and you will enjoy either and eventually both.

    Neal Wydra
     
  3. hoffy

    hoffy Member

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    Why don't you go for something cheaper to start with? I just purchased my first box of 4x5 and went for Arista EDU Ultra 100. 25 sheets is $16 compared to FP4, which is $33.
     
  4. michael_r

    michael_r Subscriber

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    They are both wonderful films. Tonality is similar and they are both very flexible. Delta is finer grained than FP4+ but in 4x5 grain is not much of an issue unless you are making very large prints. Delta has better reciprocity characteristics than FP4+.
     
  5. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    Delta100 = Ilford's answer to Tmax
    FP4+ = Ilford's answer to PlusX
     
  6. Adrian Twiss

    Adrian Twiss Member

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    Arista EDU is repackaged fomapan 100. I use quite a bit of this when light conditions allow. However, my personal film speed is 1so 50 which may make it a little slow for your needs. Also its reciprocity characteristics are none too impressive needing adjustment, according to foma, at 1/2 second. Lastly whilst it is tonally a very sharp, and contrasty, film I have found it to be "fussy" in processing needing, in my case, distilled water for my working solutions combined with a couple of drops of wetting agent to avoid mottling. I must stress that these are my personal findings and other users' experiences may be different.
     
  7. markbarendt

    markbarendt Subscriber

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    The difference I find is that FP4 seems more forgiving, Delta a bit more finicky. Beyond that they are both just fine thanks, IMO.

    The other reason I like FP4 is that of the prints I have from Delta and FP4, and regardless of what I prefer; the FP4 shots simply get more compliments. I have no idea why, they just do.
     
  8. Vaughn

    Vaughn Subscriber

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    Why not Tri-X or a 400ASA film? Sunny 16 says f16 at 1/400, or f22 at 1/200, with room at each end (I assume your lens closes down to f45 or f64).

    I use a lot of FP4+ and occasional Tri-X (I have 50 sheets calling out to me -- and a bunch of empty 8x10 holders that feel, well -- empty inside). But when it comes to B&W film, I tend to be an omnivore.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 14, 2012
  9. ChristopherCoy

    ChristopherCoy Member

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    I like shooting as wide open as possible.
     
  10. pgomena

    pgomena Member

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    Shop around and you'll find FP4+ at about $1.00/sheet in 100-sheet boxes. A fine film at a decent price. You'll not see any grain in a big enlargement (16x20") from 4x5, regardless of the film. I find FP4+ more versatile and less finicky than Delta. Delta seems to gain contrast very quickly in development making it a little more difficult to control, especially for a beginner. Both are good films.

    Peter Gomena
     
  11. Mark Fisher

    Mark Fisher Subscriber

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    If you like TriX 400, use the FP4. It looks more like TriX.
     
  12. Bill Burk

    Bill Burk Subscriber

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    ChristopherCoy,

    You could stick with Tri-X. Use a lower EI and then you can have your "wide open" f/5.6 in open shade, f/11 in daylight. The apertures of 4x5 "feel" wider than the f/stop number you're accustomed to with smaller formats.

    If you change to tabular-grain emulsions in 4x5 it is like making two changes at once (film size and type of film). You might not know what change made you like your new results.

    For my case, I switched to TMY-2, which I never used in any other format before. I was hooked on it and rarely use anything else in 4x5 because I like the fine grain and sharpness so much.

    p.s. I work for Kodak but the opinions and positions I take are my own and not necessarily those of EKC.
     
  13. mopar_guy

    mopar_guy Subscriber

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    Here's another vote for Tri-X. You can also rate Tri-X at 200.
     
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  15. ChristopherCoy

    ChristopherCoy Member

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    Thanks y'all. I ended up ordering a 25 sheet box of the Arista EDU stuff. It was the cheapest film that I could find for my trial runs.

    In the future I'll probably order some FP4 in all formats because I'm trying to get away from Tri-X, and Kodak chemicals completely. I've got one more bag of Dektol to mix up and use, and 5 more rolls of 120 and then I'm done.
     
  16. hoffy

    hoffy Member

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    Good move! It won't cost the earth for the inevitable stuff up's.
     
  17. markbarendt

    markbarendt Subscriber

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    I've used the Arista in 4x5 and it has worked well, great for getting your feet under you and then some.

    When you get to FP4 I'm sure you'll truly enjoy the results.

    I also understand the worries nudging us all away from Kodak, but on the remote chance you don't know, the TX you know from 135 and 120 is not the same film as the TXP you'll get in sheets.

    Using TXP in 4x5 is worth putting on your bucket list, it is truly special.
     
  18. Vaughn

    Vaughn Subscriber

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    Perhaps a neutral density filter or use of a darkly colored filter might let you open up 2 or three stops.
     
  19. ChristopherCoy

    ChristopherCoy Member

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    I dont have any ND filters, but I'm glad you brought that up. Would you happen to know what kind/size of filters I need for a Speed Graphic with this lens?
     

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  20. markbarendt

    markbarendt Subscriber

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    If I had to make a Scientific Wild Ass Guess I'd say 49mm, roughly 1.93" (just shy of 1-15/16").

    Put a ruler to it, just remember that thread sizes are measured to the outside of the threads.
     
  21. markbarendt

    markbarendt Subscriber

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    Also if you have a larger filters, say 52mm for your 35mm cameras. there are step up rings.
     
  22. ChristopherCoy

    ChristopherCoy Member

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    Yeah, but I dont think this lens has normal filter threads...
     
  23. markbarendt

    markbarendt Subscriber

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    Why would you think that?
     
  24. ChristopherCoy

    ChristopherCoy Member

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    Huh... Look at that, it does have filter threads.
     
  25. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

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    You need a series filter adapter. Somewhere I have a table of sizes. If I find it soon I'll post the exact size you need.
     
  26. markbarendt

    markbarendt Subscriber

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    Giggle.