30 meters 60mm EDUPE Film

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by afrank, Mar 27, 2012.

  1. afrank

    afrank Member

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    Hi all!

    I recently got a few sealed cans of E-6 EDUPE EI 50 Kodakchrome 30m each. It is clearly expired but I was wondering what correction in EI should I use, +1? I heard I should underrate B&W film by 1 stop for every decade passed its expiration date, what about Slide E6?

    Thanks for any advice!
     
  2. DREW WILEY

    DREW WILEY Member

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    Old EDupe has a high risk of highlight crossover, of general fog, etc. And any EDupe still around is
    probably long expired. It was tungsten balanced and with superior long exposure characteristics.
    Good luck.
     
  3. luigidiep

    luigidiep Member

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    If your film is stored in freezer all this time. Expiration date is not a factor as much. You may get a warmer highlight. But you should be fine. I have a few boxes of 4x5 50 sheets unopened and frozen since shipment. And I have dupe some 3 months ago. Almost as good as new. Good luck.

    L
     
  4. Mike Wilde

    Mike Wilde Member

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    You sure it was Kodachrome? I thought Ektachrome. I have a stock of the Fuji and Kodak product. It is slow , and needs filtration, but has extremely long straight line response.

    The best results are found by testing with a series of varying equalt steps between denisty density white to black targets as the subject. These are found on a macbeth target, or in old darkroom data guides.

    Then you read the results with the three colour chanels of a densitimeter, and work on getting the three cuves an equal distance apart on the log plot.

    Slope of the response curves is determined by the first developer time, starting bottom point of the straight line part of the curves by exposure, and the space between the curves is adjusted by filtration while taking.

    For instance with my Fuji rtp stuff I shoot slide dupes into an MR-16 source at 8" with a bellows, 50mm macro lens and slide duper holder, at f/8 1/30th.

    My daylight balanced Ektachome needs 30cc green, and gets exposed on a Bowens Illumitran on full power, balanced needle output at f/8 with a 50mm enlarging lens as the taking element.