35mm ASA 400 film suggestions

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by gryffinwings, Aug 13, 2012.

  1. gryffinwings

    gryffinwings Member

    Messages:
    13
    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2012
    Shooter:
    35mm
    I'm looking for some suggestions for 35mm film in ASA 400 film, I need a film for different lighting situations. I shoot indoor and outdoor. I want this in a color film.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 13, 2012
  2. illumiquest

    illumiquest Member

    Messages:
    915
    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2010
    Location:
    Portland Ore
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    That's a hugely broad question...
     
  3. Helinophoto

    Helinophoto Member

    Messages:
    634
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2011
    Location:
    Norway
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    There are a variety of options.

    Personally I prefer Fuji Neopan 400 in 35mm to Kodak Tri-X, TMax 400 and Delta 400.
     
  4. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

    Messages:
    18,034
    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2004
    Location:
    West Midland
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Tmax or Delta 400 are both superb films and can cope with a wide variety of lighting conditions.

    Ian
     
  5. gryffinwings

    gryffinwings Member

    Messages:
    13
    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2012
    Shooter:
    35mm
    I see, I guess I could use some help, I'm not sure what I want and what films to go after. If you could maybe ask me questions on what I want out of my film.
     
  6. gryffinwings

    gryffinwings Member

    Messages:
    13
    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2012
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Crap, I forgot to mention that I want a color film, sorry for not putting that in earlier.
     
  7. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

    Messages:
    7,419
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2009
    Location:
    northern Pa.
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Color or B&W???
     
  8. benjiboy

    benjiboy Subscriber

    Messages:
    8,533
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2005
    Location:
    U.K.
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    You haven't even indicated if you want monochrome, colour negative or reversal 400 I.S.O film, how can we answer your question ?
     
  9. Slixtiesix

    Slixtiesix Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,101
    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2006
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Negative: Kodak New Portra 400
    Slide: Fuji Provia 400X
     
  10. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

    Messages:
    4,252
    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2009
    Location:
    Central Flor
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Seems like a consumer film of any kind is a good candidate. You are basically saying your subject will be in varying conditions with no specific lighting control.

    Stressing about a film only makes sense when you know what you are shooting and the condition the subject is going to be under. In your type of scenario, film will be the least affecting factor. Perhaps except for an extreme film like Kodak Ektar. It's very contrasty and saturated. If you like that kind of look, fine. If not, not.
     
  11. Thomas Bertilsson

    Thomas Bertilsson Subscriber

    Messages:
    15,206
    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2003
    Location:
    Minnesota
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    This is in the color film section, so you basically have two options, Portra 400 or Fuji 400H, in the pro section. You could also shoot slides and use Provia 400. There are Kodak 400 and Fuji 400 consumer color neg films still as well. That's five or six options for you.

    I am not familiar with the Rollei offerings, but someone more knowledgeable about those can reply to that.

    Color film market is definitely not as extensive as it used to be. I used to love shooting Kodak E200 slide film pushed to 400 (this film was made for shooting from 200 to 800).
     
  12. RPC

    RPC Member

    Messages:
    619
    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2006
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    No need to apologize. This is the color forum, answers should be based on that to avoid non-helpful answers.
     
  13. summicron1

    summicron1 Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,946
    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2010
    Location:
    Ogden, Utah
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    the film you want is the film that works best for you ... sorry, no way to answer better. Mary Ellen Mark used Tri-X for decades, and only tri-x, because it worked for her.

    so you have to find one that comes close to your needs, then use it until you get good at it.
     
  14. Sponsored Ad
  15. RPC

    RPC Member

    Messages:
    619
    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2006
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I forgot to mention in my above post that I recommend Portra 400. For some reason I was unable to edit the post.
     
  16. Jeff Kubach

    Jeff Kubach Member

    Messages:
    6,930
    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2007
    Location:
    Richmond VA.
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Fuji 400 is good.

    Jeff
     
  17. nworth

    nworth Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,191
    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2005
    Location:
    Los Alamos,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Portra 400 will do nicely. The Kodak consumer color films are also available in the 400 speed, and they are quite good. They are generally somewhat more saturated than Portra, but are similar in grain and latitude.
     
  18. EASmithV

    EASmithV Member

    Messages:
    1,925
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2008
    Location:
    Maryland
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Portra 400
     
  19. rbeech

    rbeech Member

    Messages:
    40
    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2012
    Location:
    Michigan
    Shooter:
    35mm
    I like Arista EDU from Freestyle Photo.
     
  20. Erik Petersson

    Erik Petersson Subscriber

    Messages:
    683
    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2006
    Location:
    Stockholm, S
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Both Porta 400 and Fuji 400 colour negative pro films are absolutely excellent. There are some differences but maybe at this stage you should just pick one of them and use it until you get a feel for it. The consumer alternatives are also very good, pick one of them if price is an issue.

    If you have any specific needs, such as better skin tones, accurate colour rendering, or perhaps exaggerated colours (can be nice for nature photography), please let us know.
     
  21. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

    Messages:
    6,660
    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2005
    Location:
    Los Angeles,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I'd also suggest looking into the Kodak Gold line. I think it may have been cancelled but it was decent stuff for consumer-class film. I fyou can find it you'll likely be pleased. Whatever you do, do not get sucked into the Kodak consumer ColorPlus product line -- pure trash.
     
  22. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

    Messages:
    19,983
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2003
    Location:
    local
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    fuji superia 400 ..
    get it short date, expired / OLD if you can
     
  23. Aurelien

    Aurelien Advertiser Advertiser

    Messages:
    669
    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2006
    Location:
    Limoges, Fra
    Shooter:
    Med. Format RF
    The new Bergger BRF 400 Plus?
     
  24. Richard S. (rich815)

    Richard S. (rich815) Subscriber

    Messages:
    4,959
    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2003
    Location:
    San Francisco
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Please share with us how you get color from a B&W film? ;-)
     
  25. Aurelien

    Aurelien Advertiser Advertiser

    Messages:
    669
    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2006
    Location:
    Limoges, Fra
    Shooter:
    Med. Format RF
    Oh sorry, i did not notice the pages 2 and3... I thaught it was black and white.

    But you can obtain color from black and white. It's called trichromie in french
     
  26. gryffinwings

    gryffinwings Member

    Messages:
    13
    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2012
    Shooter:
    35mm
    The kind of post processing I did on my pictures for digital was that I liked to add contrast, I increased exposure but decreased brightness, reduced saturation sometimes to have more natural skin tones and increased vibrancy sometimes, mind you some of these settings I didn't change a lot but some. Maybe this can find something close for what I like.