35mm film - From the fridge to the freezer?

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by TexasLangGenius, Mar 7, 2012.

  1. TexasLangGenius

    TexasLangGenius Member

    Messages:
    29
    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2012
    Location:
    Lubbock, TX
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Hi everyone,

    I'm getting a huge shipment of Ektachrome later this week, and I figure that I would throw all that in the freezer as soon as I got it, but what about all the Ektachrome and Velvia in 35mm that I already have in the fridge? They're all still in their original boxes and containers, so is it okay to move these all to the freezer, since I won't be able to shoot all of it by the expiry date? Will there be any moisture problems?

    I'm freaking out, since I've heard of certain types of freezers possibly ruining film, and I'm saving a lot of my E-6 film for much later. I want that Ektachrome to last!

    Thanks!
     
  2. clayne

    clayne Member

    Messages:
    2,837
    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2008
    Location:
    San Francisc
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Freezer won't hurt the film at all. Just transfer it from fridge to freezer. ZERO ISSUES.
     
  3. EASmithV

    EASmithV Member

    Messages:
    1,925
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2008
    Location:
    Maryland
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I freeze everything. No issues so far.
     
  4. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Member

    Messages:
    9,092
    Joined:
    May 3, 2006
    Location:
    Ryde, Isle o
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    I'm not sure why a type of freezer would be harmful. The only variable is temperature and they don't vary too much.


    Steve.
     
  5. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

    Messages:
    17,021
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2005
    Location:
    Delta, BC, Canada
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    The freezers that automatically defrost are not ideal for film.
     
  6. Poisson Du Jour

    Poisson Du Jour Member

    Messages:
    4,267
    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2008
    Location:
    Richmond/Geelong, AUS
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Unexposed film can be frozen, deep frozen for however long you want to. Forget about cosmic rays, aliens and grandma's left over chooklotto pieces. The one point you need to take care with is preparing to use it: after deep freezing, allow one — ideally two hours to bring the film to room temperature. Roll film is especially susceptible to damage and should be placed in a sealed bag after exposure and only refrigerated (not frozen).
     
  7. benjiboy

    benjiboy Subscriber

    Messages:
    8,598
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2005
    Location:
    U.K.
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I'd never thought of that Matt, that's a good point.
     
  8. Alan W

    Alan W Subscriber

    Messages:
    455
    Joined:
    May 16, 2009
    Location:
    Tennessee
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Don't they all?
     
  9. clayne

    clayne Member

    Messages:
    2,837
    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2008
    Location:
    San Francisc
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Best non-commercial freezers I've found for film are deep chest freezers.
     
  10. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

    Messages:
    6,710
    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2005
    Location:
    Los Angeles,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Homage to EASmithV

    I refrigerate everything. No issues so far.
     
  11. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

    Messages:
    17,021
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2005
    Location:
    Delta, BC, Canada
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    No, many freezers are "manual" defrost only.
     
  12. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Member

    Messages:
    9,092
    Joined:
    May 3, 2006
    Location:
    Ryde, Isle o
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Why? What effect does it have on the film?


    Steve.
     
  13. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

    Messages:
    17,021
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2005
    Location:
    Delta, BC, Canada
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Steve:

    They defrost automatically by periodically warming up the freezer and its contents.

    And that isn't ideal for film.
     
  14. Sponsored Ad
  15. clayne

    clayne Member

    Messages:
    2,837
    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2008
    Location:
    San Francisc
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Yep. However it's still better than leaving it at ambient where temp cycling will happen anyways. I also don't believe the defrost temp rises above standard refrigeration temperatures either.

    In short, use a freezer, any freezer.
     
  16. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Member

    Messages:
    9,092
    Joined:
    May 3, 2006
    Location:
    Ryde, Isle o
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    I'm sure it's not a real problem. If the defrost cycle is safe for stored food, film should be fine.


    Steve.
     
  17. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

    Messages:
    6,710
    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2005
    Location:
    Los Angeles,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    That has always been my guess too!
     
  18. benjiboy

    benjiboy Subscriber

    Messages:
    8,598
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2005
    Location:
    U.K.
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I bought a big chest freezer that I have in my basement a couple of years ago to keep my film etc. in, and to stop my wife complaining about me taking up all the space in the fridge/freezer in our kitchen, but at some time you have to defrost freezers or the build up of ice makes the motor work so hard that it packs up, so you need to have a plan B for this eventuality.
     
  19. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Member

    Messages:
    9,092
    Joined:
    May 3, 2006
    Location:
    Ryde, Isle o
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    How long does it take to de-frost a freezer? (I don't know as I can't remember ever doing it). Whatever length of time it is, it can't be detrimental to the film to allow it to warm up a bit then go cold again when the de-frost is finished.

    And what are you supposed to do with food in a freezer at de-frosting time?


    Steve.
     
  20. ME Super

    ME Super Member

    Messages:
    1,234
    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2011
    Location:
    Central Illinois, USA
    Shooter:
    35mm
    I've actually shadowed someone who worked on so-called frost-free freezers. The way they work is that there's a timer on a 10-12 hour cycle. Every 10-12 hours the freezer goes from "freeze" to "defrost." The fan that normally kicks on during the freeze cycle is turned off, and a wire heats up, melting off any frost that has accumulated on the freezer's refrigeration coils. After 15 minutes, the defrost cycle is over and the freezer goes back into freeze mode. There's enough time to get the frost off of the coils, but not enough to significantly warm up the freezer. Your frozen film should be fine - after all, your ice cream didn't melt, did it?
     
  21. TexasLangGenius

    TexasLangGenius Member

    Messages:
    29
    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2012
    Location:
    Lubbock, TX
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Thanks for all your input, everyone. I can't find the manual for my fridge online (and I doubt my landlady has it), so I can't check to see if the freezer on top my fridge has a defrost cycle (there is NO room at all in my efficiency apartment to put a mini freezer). I have been worrying that if I put my E-6 35mm in the freezer, that a defrost cycle would get to it and ruin it. I also want to save the Fuji 64T I have in medium format until I can afford a really good medium format camera, but I know that 120 comes in its own foil.

    I guess I'll just keep all of it in the fridge for now.
     
  22. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Member

    Messages:
    9,092
    Joined:
    May 3, 2006
    Location:
    Ryde, Isle o
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Even if it warms up to room temperature and stays there for a week, it's not going to affect the film.


    Steve.
     
  23. anikin

    anikin Subscriber

    Messages:
    897
    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2009
    Location:
    Capital of O
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Unless of course you forget to wrap the film boxes into water proof pouches before putting them into the freezer. Guess how I know about that? :whistling:
     
  24. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

    Messages:
    17,021
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2005
    Location:
    Delta, BC, Canada
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Remember folks, my comment was that auto-defrost freezers are not ideal for film.

    Ideal would be two manual defrost freezers, where each is less than half full (so you can transfer film from one to the other when you do a manual defrost every year or so).

    But if your resources are stretched, an auto-defrost freezer is better than none, and definitely better than just using a refrigerator.
     
  25. benjiboy

    benjiboy Subscriber

    Messages:
    8,598
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2005
    Location:
    U.K.
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    It takes about twelve hours to defrost a large chest freezer and about eight a fridge freezer and about the same amount of time to get them down to temperature on full power when you switch them back on again, Before you defrost a freezer you use all the food in it, and buy more to replace it afterwards.
     
  26. ME Super

    ME Super Member

    Messages:
    1,234
    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2011
    Location:
    Central Illinois, USA
    Shooter:
    35mm
    We have an upright freezer in the basement at home. I can usually defrost it in 4 hours. I don't have a problem with stuff melting because I catch it when there's not a whole lot in it and I stick the stuff in coolers. Here's the secret to doing it in 4 hours that I learned from my mom before we got a frost-free refrigerator. Boil water on the stove. Once the water begins to boil, turn it off and put the pan in the freezer. This method works best with at least two pans of water. One is on the stove while the other is in the freezer. Rotate pans frequently. The steam melts the frost above it while the bottom of the pan melts the frost under it.

    ME Super