4x4 vs 6x6

Discussion in 'Lo-Fi Cameras' started by Russ Young, Jan 25, 2007.

  1. Russ Young

    Russ Young Member

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    I'd like to see a compilation of which toy/simple cameras produce which negative size. It seems such as waste of film to make a 4x4 on 120 film. Additionally, who has positive experience opening up any of the 4x4s to larger negatives?
    Thanks a bunch,
    Russ
     
  2. Jon Shiu

    Jon Shiu Subscriber

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    Hi, the Diana camera does 4x4 but it takes 16 exposures instead of the 12 on 6x6 such as Holga. I generally don't see any advantage of the larger negative and usually enlarge the Diana negs to about 6.5 inches square, but sometime to 14 or 15 inches square.

    Jon
     
  3. dschneller

    dschneller Member

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    4x4 can be purchased, why open it up to 120? Unless you are into camera modifications.

    Dave
     
  4. mfobrien

    mfobrien Member

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    The Diana and its clones do make a 4x4 image on 120 -- and I think that is part of their unique look. So, I don't think of it as being wasteful any more than 6x4.5 on 120. All other cameras that make a 4x4 image use 127, which is getting harder to find.
     
  5. Russ Young

    Russ Young Member

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    Hi Mark-

    I'm a tad lost, sorry. If all you can see is the final print, what is the "unique look" of the 4x4 neg???

    Thanks in advance for illuminating me,
    Russ
     
  6. MenacingTourist

    MenacingTourist Member

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    advantage of 4x4 on 120

    I have had "issues" where the take up was loose and some edge fogging occoured as I changed film. I'd say this happens about half the time but since the 4x4 image is further away from the edges the fog doesn't reach it. I also use those nifty 120 film canisters so I think that helps as well.

    Alan.
     
  7. Kobin

    Kobin Member

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    My toy is a Brownie Bullet, takes 127 film and makes 4x6.5 negatives. Has a Dacon lens (plastic).

    K.
     
  8. sjperry

    sjperry Member

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    I have a couple of cameras that could be classrd as "toys" - i.e. made for mass consumer point & shoot market. A Kodak Brownie Starlight (50's) which takes 127, and an Instamatic which takes 126. I used each one at least once to verify function. That's about it. I have A Kodak Pony 35mm that I use occasionally for fun, but it's a better camera than "toy" level. It has focus distance to set, as well as shutter speed and aperature.

    Some of the Polaroids made in the 60's are quite decent cameras, I'm talking about the pack film cameras they made, models 100-440 I think. Some of these have an optical rangefinder, and electronic shutters. Though the exposure is automatic. However you can adjust it by setting them to lighter or darker. I have to adapt them a different battery because the original is no longer available. The film is still available from Polaroid, so I adapt the battery and resell them. All of these kinds of cameras I check out and resell. Both 126 and 127 are available from Film for Classics, as well as 620 and a few others. They cout down and repackage new film, so its all good stuff.
    Actually, by reselling some of these old simple cameras to people who may use them, it probably contributes a little to film sales.
     
  9. Didzis

    Didzis Member

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    Not quite; Agfa Isoly cameras, hardly a Diana clone, made 4x4 image on 120 film as well. Isoly I and II are more of toy cameras, and at least Isoly I has simple meniscus lens (it's focusing, though -- a pretty classy touch). I'm not sure about Isoly II, but Isoly III has significantly better 3-element lens and more shutter speeds. Isoly Junior has non-focusing meniscus lens.
    By the way, may I add that Agfa was absolutely brilliant camera builder. The greatest thing about them was that they actually used standard film formats, unlike Kodak that suffered from NIH (Not Invented Here) quite badly. As a result, if you try to use many Kodak cameras now, your options are: a) searching for exotic film formats, often coughing up absurdly large sums of money for pretty mediocre film, b) modifying the camera or c) cutting 120 film are trying not to lose a finger in the process. On the other hand, Agfa's answer to 126 film, Rapid, uses standard 35mm film cut from a bulk roll or pulled out from its original cassette. Rapid cassettes are extremely easy to reload, the cameras often provide a square frame format, just like Instamatic, and most of the Rapid cameras are firmly in the toy camera category. All the Instamatic fun with none of the fuss!
     
  10. mfobrien

    mfobrien Member

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    Russ-- When I put that 4x4 neg in my 6x6 neg carrier, I get a nice irregular black border around the edge of the print if I decide not to mask it out on the easel.

    I have a bunch of them in my show this month, though you really can't tell fom this photo:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/mfobrien/376028524/in/photostream/
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 3, 2007