4x5 Color Film Development?

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by brianmichel, Jul 1, 2009.

  1. brianmichel

    brianmichel Member

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    Hey all,
    Just out of curiosity I've been looking more and more into 4x5 cameras/Large Format photography in general. I would like to process my own negatives as I do with Medium Format, however from what I've been reading the BTZS tubes are for b&w only? Is this true? If this is the case, how does everyone else out there process their 4x5 or larger color negatives? I'm curious as I would like to shoot color film if I make the jump to this. Let me know, thanks!
     
  2. bdial

    bdial Subscriber

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    I think most people doing color sheet film are using a Jobo. That's my plan when I get my E-6 kit mixed.
    Since BTZS tubes don't let you change chemistry in daylight, they might be awkward for color, but I'm not sure why they couldn't be used if you really wanted to.
     
  3. Neal

    Neal Subscriber

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    Dear brianmichel,

    Nothing like Jobo for small batch processing.

    Neal Wydra
     
  4. bmedkova

    bmedkova Member

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    Brian,
    i used to develop all my color 4x5. here are some personal observations:
    developing color is a multipart process, longer than b&w. it is extremely temperature sensitive. i personally do not like using jobo, at all, i always did all my development by hand in trays. if you do that, definitely use gloves; color chems are more toxic (and you will feel it on your hands). as with b&w sheet film, you need to keep rotating it, which both agitates and prevents it from sticking to each other. if you will use trays, you will need to place those into a larger tray (i think 11x14 was sufficient), into which you will have constant inflow of hot water, to stabilize the temperature. if you are developing at 90F run your warming bath at 95F or so, to compensate for transfer through plastic trays (if you have metal trays you can omit this part). i suggest you first try doing color on 120 film, in which case metal developing tanks are the (only) way to go. also, color chemicals have a shorter shelf life (from my experience) than b&w chems; i suggest buying smallest batches first. if i remember correctly they last <6 months from the time you open them.
    good luck.
    bibiana