4x5 devoloping

Discussion in 'Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by K38, Dec 6, 2013.

  1. K38

    K38 Member

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    4x5 Developing

    Hi Folks, Dwight Here,

    I would like to use my 4x5 more, I used to enjoy the polaroid back and I really miss the process. (are there any Fuji films that work in the old polaroid sheet back?) I need a system to develop 4x5 film and maybe have it scanned as I don't have a real darkroom anymore. One of the stumbling points is that I don't have access to a bunch of old 4x5 boxes to send the film off in. Are there commercially available 4x5 shipping boxes? Or a place that sells used ones? Does anyone have a favorite lab that does a good job and maybe does good scans for less than a fortune. I can't even buy a roll of 35mm Tri-X for a 150 mile radius from where I live! Times have changed, but a Leica, Hasselblad, or Sinar still gives me a warm feeling. I don't have a 4x5 enlarger or a viable place to use it so I am open to any combination of steps to get a useable print. I forgot who said " I don't care if the print is on a bathmat as long it is a good print!)

    Peace, Love, and Tri-X!

    Dwight
     
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  2. Gregg Obst

    Gregg Obst Member

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    I guess we'll start with instant film backs. Fuji stopped making FP-3000B45 4x5 instant pack film a while back. They still sell fp-100C (color) and fp-3000b (B&W) in the 3x4 size but you need a special holder for that on a 4x5 and they just announced recently the discontinuation of the fp-3000b. If I was a betting man, I'd say fp-100c will not last another three years as a Fuji product so I don't see that as a viable option. Polaroid is, of course, no longer making type 55 film, though a new project called "New 55" has been working on creating a new, original instant film for 4x5 that will have similar characteristics to type 55.

    Do you have any experience with your own home film developing ? Are you looking to shoot B&W primarily or also C41 or E6 slide films ?
     
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  3. K38

    K38 Member

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    B&W 99% of the time. Color is great, but I am more likely to use the digital camera for that


    D.


    Sorry, Yes I have developed lots of 120 and 35mm B&W and printed in a real darkroom lots. My teacher even knew Ansel Adams :smile: I have developed sheet film in trays, but it seems very slow and very easy to scratch things up.
     
  4. Gregg Obst

    Gregg Obst Member

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    A good alternative to tray development you may want to look into is using the "Taco Method" as visually explained here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/digi-film/sets/72157627864733730/

    I use this all the time and have experienced no scratching issues on the film. The key is you have to buy hair bands with no clasp, hard plastic or metal on them that could scratch the film. That will allow you to develop up to four sheets of film at a time in a single Patterson Universal Tank. I use about 700ml of Xtol (one shot developer) to fill the tank. Works great with stand development with Rodinal at 1:100 as well. There are all sorts of options for home developing these days but that's the one I use.
     
  5. Regular Rod

    Regular Rod Member

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    Get yourself a Paterson Orbital Processor like this...

    [​IMG]

    Modify it like this...

    http://freepdfhosting.com/f640343f29.pdf

    Load it in your same dark tent or big changing bag that you use to load your film holders.

    Develop as you see fit...

    RR
     
  6. K38

    K38 Member

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    Dear God, I cannot spell!!!
     
  7. K38

    K38 Member

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    Thanks Guys,

    These are really helpful!

    DLB
     
  8. L Gebhardt

    L Gebhardt Subscriber

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    Another option is a Jobo Expert drum (3010) on either a simple roller base, or better yet a Jobo with lift. Some people have made alternatives with funnels and tubing to be able to fill while rotating by hand on the roller base. I think Jobo gives the most even results based on all the methods I've tried. I think it's impossible for me to not scratch sheet film when developing in trays. I seem to get mottling with the CombiPlan.

    I used a Jobo with lift in the kitchen for a few years before I setup the permanent darkroom. They are light weight when there's no water in them, but you do need a bit of storage space since they aren't exactly small.
     
  9. lightwisps

    lightwisps Subscriber

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    Dwight, can't be of much help developing your 4X5 film since I got rid of my tanks, but do have a 4X5 enlarger and can happily print for you. I typically use Ilford paper, either RC of Fiber and of course can tone any prints you want. I also do 35mm and 120 film as well, and in those sizes, I am prepared to develop the film as well as make the prints. I am also equipped to dry mount the prints as well as matte them upon request. If I can be of any help, you can PM me here, or always email me at lightwisps@yahoo.com.

    Good luck whatever route you decide to take.

    Don
     
  10. bernard_L

    bernard_L Subscriber

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  11. kintatsu

    kintatsu Member

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    I've been developing my 4x5 b$w in the bathroom. I have a tiny bathroom with no windows, so I just use the toilet back as a bench and the sink to hold the water stop tray. Glad makes their Christmas storage in just the right size. I can even do 5x7 prints with some small room in the same "tray." They also last forever. 3 of those, a metronome app or website set to 60BPM, and a timer set outside the door and you're off to the races!
     
  12. smithdoor

    smithdoor Member

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    Does take a lot
    ever thing you need cost under $75.00 see list below
    I use used bottles 1/2 gal free

    Good luck
    Dave

    Yankee Adjustable 4x5 Cut film Developing Tank
    Model #4945
    $29.99 $29.99

    LegacyPro 6 inch Glass Thermometer
    Model #62010
    $3.99 $3.99



    Arista Flow Wetting Agent 4 oz.
    Model #6170
    $4.19 $4.19

    Arista 76 Powder Film Developer to Make 1 Gallon
    Model #550110
    $5.99 $5.99

    Arista Arifix Powder Fixer to Make 1 Gallon
    Model #550225
    $4.99 $4.99

    Arista Liquid Paper Developer to Make 1 Gallon
     
  13. CatLABS

    CatLABS Subscriber

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    You have several options:
    Jobo Expert tanks (3010 or 3006 if you also do 5X7), and if you want to spend less you can get the 2520 tank and 2509n reel (which will also enable you to process roll film). You can use a manual or motorized rollerbase, or you can roll by hand. If you want to go all in you can get a Jobo processor.
    Any choice of the above will pay for itself very quickly when you compare to the savings of sending film out, not to mention the improved quality, and most important the fun of it all. Then you can also do C41 and e6 at home with ease...

    Scanning is easy - and can good results can come from an Enpson v700. Imacon PII's are on ebay often under 2000$. If you want to do it really cheap you can get a microtek scanner for under 50$ that will do 4X5 (5700 and 5800 models), they are slow but quality is not bad, especially for the price tag.
     
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  15. momus

    momus Member

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    Don't worry about the spelling. In these dumbed down days, who would notice?
     
  16. bob01721

    bob01721 Member

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    Besides... it's hard to have much respect for a guy who only knows one way to spell a word. :wink:
     
  17. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    hi dwight

    i always thought developing in trays would be prone to scratches
    i used to develop in hangers and tanks .. then got weird marks on my film
    from hangers so i went to trays .. haven't stopped .. ( never a scratch after 2000+ sheets of film )
    i sometimes do a mix of 40 sheets of 4x5 and 5x7
    as long as you learn how to shuffle them and separate the sheets it really isn't a problem ...
    separating the sheets in a prewet/water bath
    is probably the hardest part of the operation .. ( it can be a PITA )
    if you have 3 large tupperware containers ( dollar store sells them cheap! ) you can use hangers and tanks
    its not hard either, as long as your hangers don't mark your film, and if they do, you eliminate the bad one/s ...

    good luck !
    john
     
  18. thegman

    thegman Member

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    I just tried the Taco method for the first time, can't say I loved it. Maybe the hair bands I used were too small or something, but I had a hard time getting 4 sheets into the tank. Right now I'm thinking about either a mod54 and a 3 reel Paterson tank, or give the Yankee a go.

    On the plus side, it was the first time I ever developed film, my chemistry was too warm, and I made a mess of the tacos, but I still got some success, enough to spur me on and want to try again, and shoot more 4x5.
     
  19. Regular Rod

    Regular Rod Member

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    The Paterson Orbital is incredibly easy to use. Loading is simply a matter of laying the film into the tray, emulsion side up. No clipping into place. No vexatious popping out of position followed by damage as you try to relocate the film back into the slot... The Paterson Orbital gives you all the advantages of tray development with the added advantages of a daylight tank.

    RR
     
  20. Light Guru

    Light Guru Member

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    That are also hard to find and expensive when you do find them.
     
  21. Regular Rod

    Regular Rod Member

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    I think this might be a myth. I just did a search for "Paterson Orbital" on eBay and two came up. £120? Is that expensive? They save you from damaged negatives. They allow you to use stand and semi-stand agitation regimes. They can be used for 4x5, 5x7, whole-plate, and 8x10. Since I modified mine to suit film as well as paper I've been delighted with the results. Certainly paid me back handsomely...

    RR
     
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  22. CatLABS

    CatLABS Subscriber

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    Since the last thread about 4X5 options came up some weeks ago there has been one listed this is the same one that has been listed. A history search shows they are fairly rare and come up about 1-2 times a month, mostly in the UK/Europe.
    235$ including shipping to the US is expensive, when there are several cheaper (40-70% less) various other locally available, currently being produced options that require no modifications and also offer other benefits such as modular systems or roll film processing capability.

    While the orbital might be a good tool, and works for you with these mods, it is infact quite a rarity, which is not say its not good only thats its not the easiest to find.

    That said, there have already been numerous APUG and LFPF threads about this with extensive info and opinions in the matter spanning hundreds of posts.... perhaps there should bea sticky about this to consolidate all that has already been said any number of times...
     
  23. Regular Rod

    Regular Rod Member

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    Good Idea!
    :D
    RR
     
  24. nsurit

    nsurit Subscriber

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    I'm in Corpus Christi and understand the problem with buying film/chemistry/paper locally. Toilet paper is about the only locally available type. That being said Holland Photo in Austin and A-Z labs in Houston both still do film. DIY B&W processing can be done relatively easily. I use a MOD54 film holder and Patterson tank. I do have three enlargers capable of enlarging 4X5 film in my darkroom and an Epson V700 scanner that does a good job of scaning film. It isn't rocket science. Buy my film and chemistry from B&H. Good luck. Get dark . . . get wet. Bill Barber
     
  25. jerrybro

    jerrybro Subscriber

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    Dwight, how many sheets will you be processing at a time? 1, 3, 6, 417? There are a lot of ways to process film, some are cheap, some aren't.
     
  26. ataim

    ataim Member

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    I also use the MOD54. Its really easy to use (take a little practice to load it correctly but after that its fine). It holds 6 sheets of 4x5 and uses 1 liter of chemicals. The key to using it is not to aggetate it too much, it can give you uneven development. Oh and pre-soak the film. I love it and recommend it, however others have had different results. http://www.largeformatphotography.i...oughts-on-the-new-MOD54/page2&highlight=mod54 and search for MOD54, you can find lots of people that love it (me) and others that hate it.

    Paul