4x5 film developer questions

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Greg Heath, Jul 10, 2009.

  1. Greg Heath

    Greg Heath Subscriber

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    I have just started shooting 4x5 film (Arista EDU film).

    What film developer would you use on 4x5 to get the best results?

    I realize that there are many facets to this question. Personal and technical.

    I have been using D-76 Stock.

    Any recommendations for another developer? and why you use what you use.

    greg
     
  2. Anscojohn

    Anscojohn Subscriber

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    Replenished D23.
     
  3. Venchka

    Venchka Member

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    Xtol 1:3 for everything. Times can be found on the internet. It works!
     
  4. PhotoJim

    PhotoJim Member

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    D-76 is good but I'd use it 1:1 or 1:3 with sheet film. There is no need to minimize grain and every need to maximize sharpness.

    The pyrogallol and pyrocatechin formulae are worth playing with, too. I am very fond of PMK.
     
  5. Lowell Huff

    Lowell Huff Inactive

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    You are using ARIST FILM...... ARISTA PREMIUM FILM DEVELOPER
     
  6. mikebarger

    mikebarger Subscriber

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    D76 is a very good developer, it'll give you all you need.

    I'm using 510 pyro for most of my work, and HC110 for the rest. I like how 510 treats highlights.

    Mike
     
  7. Neal

    Neal Subscriber

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    Dear Greg,

    Use whatever you're already using.

    Neal Wydra
     
  8. Martin Aislabie

    Martin Aislabie Subscriber

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    You have enough variables to be dealing with when learning to use 5x4 - don't add another one needlessly

    Martin
     
  9. Greg Heath

    Greg Heath Subscriber

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    Thanks for your thoughts everyone. I very much appreciate your personal recommendations.

    I had on another post indicated that I had always used D76 "stock", and had never diluted it. I will try a 1+1 mix, as a one-shot deal.

    I think someone said that with a 1+1 mixture I can get better detail in the negative ?

    Greg

    Greg
     
  10. jeroldharter

    jeroldharter Member

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    Hey Greg. Glad to see you are forging ahead.

    D76 should be fine.

    Since you are starting out, pick a developer that offers versatility with normal, expanded, and contracted development. On that basis, try Xtol just to see. I tested Xtol vs. TMAX and decided to go with Xtol due to the greater versatility. From a practical standpoint, it dissolves very easily so mixing is less tedious and it is inexpensive. TMAX is also good if you want the convenience of a liquid.
     
  11. Greg Heath

    Greg Heath Subscriber

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    My 4x5 is all Pinhole, so it's not 'that' difficult. Plus I built the camera from scratch. (box with a hole) I'm still trying to figure out where to stand for the best photo :smile:

    A great photographer up in Steven's Point gave me his Cambo SCX setup but I need a lens plate and lens. That will have to wait till I find another job. ($$$)

    It's a choice between Ramen Noodle or photo chemicals/Camera Equipment. I think Camera equipment is a better choice. I could stand to lose a couple of # anyway.

    G
     
  12. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    caffenol C ..
    forgot the why part ..
    it is cheap, and easy and the negatives
    print like a dream ...
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 10, 2009
  13. Rick Levine

    Rick Levine Member

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    After being away from shooting for the last few years I recently tested the new TMAX 400 and Rollo Pyro in my Jobo CPP2 processor and found, during initial testing, I was getting N-3 to N+3 densities to match a reading of between 1.25 to 1.35 on my densitometer (diffusion head).

    I will be doing some real world testing in the next few days. I know gray card testing doesn't always translate to actual full scale images but the initial testing is promising.

    The nice thing about Rollo Pyro is that I no longer have to introduce nitrogen into the processor to reduce the over oxidation of the neg.
     
  14. nworth

    nworth Subscriber

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    D-76 stock is a good choice. It works well with just about all films. Diluting it doesn't really buy you anything at 4X5. Most other developers also work well with 4X5. You might want to try HC-110 if you like the one-shot approach.
     
  15. PhotoJim

    PhotoJim Member

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    Diluting D-76 gives you greater sharpness and smaller grain. It also gives you greater consistency and lower processing cost (you use it one-shot). The only down side is that the processing times are slightly longer.
     
  16. johnnywalker

    johnnywalker Subscriber

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    I use HC-110 Dilution "H" with 4X5 Arista Edu Ultra 200, which I believe is Foma film, with good results. I use the HC-110 mixed from the bottle, and find it very convenient. I use ID-11 for my 35 mm film, and am sure it or D-76 would also be a good choice for the Arista Edu.
     
  17. BetterSense

    BetterSense Member

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    Since all my 4x5 is pinhole, I use Diafine because it helps tame the wildly varying exposures, and grain isn't really a problem in 4x5. I use the same film.
     
  18. rst

    rst Member

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    Well, as long as you do pinhole and depending on your angle of view, you will get a good amount of contrast on your film. There is a multi-stop difference between the center of the image and the corners. So in this case I also would go for a compensating developer.

    I also do pinhole in 4x5. I do not know anything about the reciprocity factor of Arista EDU and now that you started with this film it might not be an option to try another one, but for pinhole work I try to use film with only a very low reciprocity factor for long exposures.

    Cheers
    Ruediger
     
  19. Wade D

    Wade D Member

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    I've been using D-76, Ilford ID-11 & recently Arista 76. All are very similar formulas.
    Stock solution has been my preferred method for close to 40 years. The only time I use 1:1 is in summer when I can't chill the solutions and need longer dev times for better consistency. I recently posted here about wanting to try HC 110 and found much good info as well. This old dog wants to learn new tricks.:D