4X5 speed Graphic

Discussion in 'Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by largeformat pat, Feb 4, 2013.

  1. largeformat pat

    largeformat pat Member

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    I'm sorry in advance, This is most probably here somewhere.

    I wish to make my own boards for my 4X5 Speed Graphic, Does anyone have a diagram of the board with sizes please.
    Thanks Pat:D
     
  2. EASmithV

    EASmithV Member

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    It depends on which model speed you have, they take different boards. The anniversary is the easiest to make.
     
  3. Fotoguy20d

    Fotoguy20d Subscriber

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    The anniversary takes 4x4 wooden boards - easily made with a saw, router and rabbeting bit. The pacemaker uses sheet metal boards with a formed lip on the back and small raised bumps top and bottom on the front. For those, your best bet is probably an eBay seller named heavystar. I buy his undrilled ones and cut holes as needed using a drill press.

    Dan
     
  4. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

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    I make them with fewer tools by using 1/8 inch baltic plywood, cut the two parts - the bigger square and the littler square, then gluing the two parts together with wood glue. I use a hand-powered jigsaw, a drill to start the blade on the lens hole, and a piece of sanding paper to smooth the sides. Takes about 20 minutes.
     
  5. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

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    ... but a lot longer for the black paint to dry.
     
  6. nicholai

    nicholai Member

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    Just bought an Anniversary model off of Whiteymorange, and he included four he made himself, those look incredibly easy. Just a 4x4" board with a hole. One of them has the indentation, the others dont, Quite frankly dont think its necessary.
     
  7. Fotoguy20d

    Fotoguy20d Subscriber

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    Shhh. Don't tell my wife I didn't need the router (and table, bits, jigs, etc)
     
  8. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

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    I'll be quite if you'll be quiet. I just told my wife that some guy on the internet told me that I need a router... and a new lens too. :D
     
  9. Whiteymorange

    Whiteymorange Member

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    As long as my name came up, tell the wife that some guy told you to buy a new car and some more tools while you're at it... but don't tell her it was me.
     
  10. largeformat pat

    largeformat pat Member

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    Sorry guys its the anniversary
     
  11. Whiteymorange

    Whiteymorange Member

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    The anniversary boards are quite simple. As Nicholai has said, I have made quite a few of them–some as simple as black foam-core board for short term trials of barrel lenses I had access to but didn't own or want to more permanently mount.

    The 4" square, 1/4" thick, is flat and needs only to have its bottom edge beveled on the inside so that the board can be tilted into its slot on the standard. Another layer of material can be added to the back, with at least a 1/4" set-back from all sides to act as a further light trap, but I haven't found it necessary. My most commonly used material for boards is Masonite, or hardboard. MDF (medium density fiberboard) seems to be taking over in most situations around here (eastern US) for many applications and I have also made boards with that. I usually just draw two lines from corner to corner on the front to mark the center and drill out the lens opening. For up to 1 3/4" I use an old-fashioned hand drill using an auger bit. A hole drill is used for the larger openings needed for old brass projection lenses, etc. I make the blanks 4 or 5 at a time and drill the holes as needed. If you are careful in your measurements, the threads of a lens or shutter without a flange can be screwed right into the masonite, cutting its own way in as it goes. Wax helps. I haven't had any problems, but you should be careful to make sure they are firmly attached to the board before you go jogging around with the camera and have the lens fall off!

    I sold the Anniversary Speed to Nicholai and now have to figure out new strategies. The Pacemaker boards are much more difficult to jury-rig.:confused:
     
  12. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    They are also ridiculously cheap to buy new approx $40 for 3 from Heavystar on Ebay.

    I've made my own for my pre-Anniversary Speed Graphic, as you say they are very simple.

    Ian
     
  13. bdial

    bdial Subscriber

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    This thread reminds me that one of my planned projects for the little milling machine I bought last year is a pacemaker board.
    No project is worthwhile unless it involves getting new tools.:whistling:
     
  14. winger

    winger Subscriber

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    My dad thinks of projects he can make which will need new toys, er tools.
     
  15. E. von Hoegh

    E. von Hoegh Member

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    I think of tools I want, then find projects for them.:laugh:
     
  16. Whiteymorange

    Whiteymorange Member

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    Make a few extra once you've set up the jig and I'll make it worth your while:D
     
  17. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

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    How true!
     
  18. winger

    winger Subscriber

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    +1
     
  19. winger

    winger Subscriber

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    I'd bet he does, too. I think my mom lets him think she hasn't figured that out, too. :whistling:
     
  20. Jim Jones

    Jim Jones Subscriber

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    Flat boards of fairly thin aluminum work with the Pacemaker with an accurately sized light trap attached to the back. This can be plywood, foam rubber, felt, foamcore, or almost anything else.
     
  21. Whiteymorange

    Whiteymorange Member

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    Great. I have lots of the "cold clips" once packaged with Polaroid cameras for developing film in cold weather. The aluminum is perfect for this, I believe, though I'll have to go into the studio now and check. The light traps are easy. I think I'll try backing the board in felt, to make the seal more even all around. If it works, I'm good to go with all those weird lenses I have/make/repurpose, etc.