4X5 T-MAX 100, D76, JOBO ROTARY

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Bruce Osgood, Feb 9, 2008.

  1. Bruce Osgood

    Bruce Osgood Membership Council Council

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    I'm awaiting delivery of film from Freestyle and preparing for developing it.

    The Kodak bulletins are confusing as to "New" versus "Old" T-Max and I'm supposing I will receive "New", the PROFESSIONAL T-MAX 100, rather than the "Old" T-MAX 100 PROFESSIONAL. But their published suggested times are more confusing.

    One says rotary processing for D76 1:1 is 12 minutes at 68F while another says it is 9 1/4 minutes. This is a big difference, can you suggest a starting time?
     
  2. Mick Fagan

    Mick Fagan Subscriber

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    Bruce, I process Tmax 100 which has an expiry date of 1991, so it is obviously a different version.

    I use D76 1+1 (home-brew).

    I always process 4 sheets at a time in the smallest tank on a 2509 reel, using 300ml of solution.

    I just checked my last developing run sheet and noted that I developed for 10 min 15 seconds @ 20.4 C

    The negs were quite well developed and they have a full range of tones. I had one of these negs on the light box in the darkroom because I printed it last night, it printed well.

    I check my dev temperature with an industrial electronic thermometer which has been calibrated and is re-calibrated every 6 months, that is why the quite precise measurement.

    I use a CPE2 Jobo with lift and use the high speed for the first 15 seconds then I switch to the slow speed setting for the remainder of the process.

    If I'm using this film in low contrast lighting I will add 1/8 stop of developing time to give it a bit of a bump.

    I print with a diffused enlarger and find these negs print around grade 2 3/4 to 3 1/2 on my enlarger, leaving me room to go either way for a different contrast, if required.

    I don't use a pre-wash!

    Mick.
     
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  3. Bruce Osgood

    Bruce Osgood Membership Council Council

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    Mick, Thanks for the insight. We seem to be traveling the same road.

     
  4. Mick Fagan

    Mick Fagan Subscriber

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    Bruce I too have a colour head, it is a DeVere 504, works a treat.

    One other thing regarding TMax100, I found that I need to fix for a minimum of 5 minutes with fresh solution.

    I fixed undeveloped film and found it took close to 1.5 minutes to be almost clear, and is totally clear just inside 2 minutes, so I give it 5 minutes for safety.

    By comparison FP4+ is about 1 minute to be clear

    Mick.
     
  5. Bruce Osgood

    Bruce Osgood Membership Council Council

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    Speaking of fixing, I was going to open that discussion next.

    I have on hand some TF-4 that I was using with P-Cat HD negs that I'm not doing presently.

    While it is a very effective fixer and eliminates both an acid stop bath and Hypo clean, it seems a bit expensive where stopping and Hypo are not necessarily a bad thing or to be avoided as in Pyro negs.

    I'm thinking of reverting to a non hardening fixer of home brew or a commercial brand. I'm using two 2-1/2 minute baths with a water rinse between them.

    My experience with the pre wash leads me to believe it is not a necessary step. It does remove some halided that would be removed by (and polluting) the fixer. But with a two part fix and rinse, it just may be overkill.

    I seem to be settling on a 9:30 as N development at 20-c. Not ready to say that is it though.