4x5 takes longer then 35mm but...

Discussion in 'Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by Robert, Dec 3, 2002.

  1. Robert

    Robert Member

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    I think everybody agrees 4x5 tends to take longer then smaller formats. Leading to less exposures being made. A comment I've seen is that even larger formats take even longer then 4x5. Is this true? If so why? Is it just the extra effort of moving the larger cameras? Or ? I'd think that the larger ground glass would make it easier to see what you're doing versus 4x5. Personally I think a 6x6 tlr is easier to visualize the final image over a 35mm and a 4x5 is easier then the tlr. Even with the world being upside down and backwards-))
     
  2. Jorge

    Jorge Inactive

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    Personally I have not found any more time needed between my 4x5 and the 8x10....they work just about the same. Now the 12x20 is another matter, and that is mainly because of the logistics of mounting the camera by myself on the tripod, not an easy thing to do. Once the camera is mounted though the process is the same as the 4x5.....and with only one lens sometimes is even faster, as I dont have the temptaion of changing lenses to see what different focal lenghts will do.
     
  3. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    One issue is that the smaller the format, the easier it is to carry more film, and the less costly the film. I think this is the major difference. With 8x10", 10 sheets would be a productive day for me. With 4x5" and a few Grafmatics, I feel like I've got my sheet-film motor drive on.

    Another is the larger the format the longer the lenses, and the shorter the DOF, so a little more attention to focus may be required, but not that much more.
     
  4. Robert

    Robert Member

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    I hadn't thought about the depth of field. The weight issue makes sense to me. How big is a 12x20 camera? I sketched out what a 11x14 back would look like and that seems too big to carry.
     
  5. Jorge

    Jorge Inactive

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    Yeah well needless to say I am not hauling the thing up Mt. EVerest. [​IMG] I do the Weston thing with the 12x20...if it is further away than 100 yards from the car..it is not photogenic anymore.
    To answer you question about the size, my Korona is 23 x 20 in the back and when open it can go up to 25 inches in lenght. Bellows draw is 30 inches since there is 4 inches recessed at the back and an extra inch at the lens board.
     
  6. Jim Chinn

    Jim Chinn Member

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    Robert, I think you may be refering to a reply I made to an earlier post. I stated that for me, 11x14 takes more time because 1) I have a limited number of film holders compared to 4x5 and 2) the film is much more expensive per exposure and development. Therefore I take longer to determine the exact composition, focus points, exposure etc. With 4x5 I sometimes have as many as 20 film holders in the car. When I am shooting something I can afford two exposures or even more with filtration, different lens etc. With 11x14 (and to a lesser extent 8x10) I don't have that luxury.
     
  7. Jim Chinn

    Jim Chinn Member

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    For 11x14 it is usually pretty close to the car, although I have modified an old golf bag cart with bigger wheels that at least lets me move over somewhat rough terrain or long distances on pavement.
     
  8. Robert

    Robert Member

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    Actually I was afraid it wouldn't fit in the back of the truck-))
     
  9. Jorge

    Jorge Inactive

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    </span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (Robert @ Dec 4 2002, 08:19 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>Actually I was afraid it wouldn't fit in the back of the truck-))</td></tr></table><span id='postcolor'>
    [​IMG]....is not that bad Robert...
     
  10. Robert

    Robert Member

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    When I got my 4x5 it came in a great big grey case. Opened it up and was kind of wondering where the camera was-)) Took me awhile to notice the little thing in the middle of the case. The case is so big I could put all my film holders in one end. Plus my two lens. Put a 35mm and a few lens in the middle section. The final section would still have enough room for lunch and dinner for two -)
     
  11. Jim Chinn

    Jim Chinn Member

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    You can hike with th ULF cameras. I can't remember where, but a few years ago i read an article about someone hiking with an 11x14 camera. He basically modified an old backpack rack to hold camera, film and tripod. I beleive he had a tripod modified so he could break it down into the seperate head and legs in able to better balance the load. I myself have a problem knee, injured and operated on a couple of different times and it can be difficult for me to backpack a load of that size.
     
  12. carlweese

    carlweese Member

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    I'm not sure what qualifies as a "hike" but I frequently walk several miles into the local forest reserve with my 7x17 Korona rig. Camera with lens, focus hood, two film holders fits into a backpack I bought at a camping supply place. I haven't found or figured out a rig that will let me backpack my 12x20.
     
  13. SteveGangi

    SteveGangi Member

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    In my book that counts as a hike, even without the camera, holders, tripod etc etc etc. Especially since in spite of what science says, I know that more of it is uphill than downhill, both ways.
     
  14. Marv

    Marv Member

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    If I use a tripod with a my 6X7 and truly compose an image in the view finder it takes nearly the same time as with the 4X5 or 8X10. If I hap-harzardly compose an image, letting it float in the finder hoping to crop it in the darkroom it takes less time. Unfortunately I lose that time when I get in the darkroom and try to remember what it was I was trying to capture.
    For me it is the "seeing" that takes the time, regardless of format.