620 > 120 film

Discussion in 'Camera Building, Repairs & Modification' started by IlliterateCell, Aug 2, 2007.

  1. IlliterateCell

    IlliterateCell Member

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    hello,
    I am really interested in using my grandmothers old Hollywood Reflex camera [http://www.collection-appareils.com/appareils/images/hollywood.jpg].. It's supposed to take 620 film, something my local camera stores do not have, and I read somewhere that it can take 120 film here.. Has anyone ever tried this and does it work..
    I really have no idea how to use this camera so if you have any more pointers, that would be nice
    Thank You!!!
    :smile:
     
  2. Frank R

    Frank R Subscriber

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    Here is a simpler way:
    http://personal.cfw.com/~cdwilcox/F_620.html

    If the 120 spool is metal, it cam be trimmed with a pair of metal cutting pliers (diagonal cutters).

    A lot of people here use 120 film in 620 cameras. It is a great way to use an old camera.
     
  3. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    120 & 620 films are essentially the same but on different diameter spools.

    So that's why it has to be re-spooled onto the 620 spools.

    Ian
     
  4. Dan Fromm

    Dan Fromm Member

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    Ian, the slots in the spools' ends that accept the winding key are also different.

    Illiterate, if you can read this (cheap shot, your screen name invited it), try it with a 120 spool and then you'll know. There are two issues. Can it feed from a 120 spool? Must it take up on a 620 spool? When in doubt, ask the equipment what it can do.
     
  5. Bob F.

    Bob F. Member

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    I have couple of 620 cameras (not your make unfortunately). Both will use a 120 roll of film quite happily although one needs a 620 spool as the take-up spool (or a trimmed 120) otherwise it tends to jam. As Dan suggested, suck it and see: you might be lucky.

    I suspect that the cheaper the camera was originally, the more likely a 120 roll will fit as they will not have been made to high tolerances...

    Good luck, Bob.
     
  6. copake_ham

    copake_ham Inactive

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    My experience was with a "cheapo" camera.

    I ordered some "converted" 120 into 620 rolls of both Tri-X and Fujicolor to fire up my Dad's old Kodalux as a treat for him last Father's Day.

    Using the original metal 620 spool for take-up the first roll was no problem.

    But when I then switched over and put the new, now empty, plastic 620 in the take-up spot - after initially spooling through the paper it started slipping and wouldn't advance.

    I foolishly just pulled everything out and tossed it without checking. But my guess is that the metal key on even the cheapo camera chewed up the plastic spool fitting.

    You can go on the web and easily find this "converted to 620" film - but I also suggest a search for some old metal spools to use for take-ups.

    Don't rely on the converted plastic spools to serve as take-ups.
     
  7. kaygee

    kaygee Member

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    I've had varying success with just chopping down a 120 spool. I use quite a few box cameras myself, kodak duaflex, argoflex, brownie hawkeyes, imperial 620, target 620, among others.

    One of my brownies will simply take a trimmed down 120 spool, the other one needs to have a 620 spool as the uptake otherwise it completely jams. The duaflex needs to be respooled AND needs a 620 uptake, same with the argoflex. The best way is to experiment.

    I would suggest cutting down the 120 spool that your film is one, cut down a 120 roll for the uptake, and see what happens! The worst will be that it jams, and you'll have to take it in a darkroom.

    Absolutely FABULOUS camera by the way, beautiful! I'd love to get my hands on one like that.
     
  8. elekm

    elekm Member

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    Get a second 620 spool and simply respool. Don't pay more than $3 for a 620 spool. Anything more is a ripoff. In fact, you can often buy cheapie 620 cameras with a spool for far less than what the eBay thieves charge for a single 620 spool.
     
  9. Dan Fromm

    Dan Fromm Member

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    Mike, as a sometimes eBay seller I resent your comment. The thieves on eBay are buyers who hope to buy far far below market.

    In an auction seller doesn't set the price, the second-highest bidder sets the price. If the seller sets the opening bid higher than the item is worth to anyone, he gets no bids.

    One of the great problems with eBay, also with the world in general, is that most people want nearly all that I want more than I do.