632nd roll of film

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by johnnywalker, Apr 24, 2008.

  1. johnnywalker

    johnnywalker Subscriber

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    came out completely clear. No numbers, film type, nothing. Funny, the first 631 rolls came out fine (well, aside from various exposure, composition and developing problems). What did I do, fix it before developing? Too bad, I'm sure that roll had 36 keepers :D, including a couple of my new great grand nephew.
     
  2. Kevin Caulfield

    Kevin Caulfield Subscriber

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    There are such things as faulty film rolls, so I wouldn't take it personally. Chances are you just got a faulty roll.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2008
  3. Bob F.

    Bob F. Member

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    It's always the good ones that get killed... I suspect you are correct: got the fixer confused with the developer. Didn't take me 632 rolls to do that one myself - closer to 2 :wink:

    Bob.
     
  4. Snapshot

    Snapshot Member

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    I had this happen to my recently. I'm glad I'm not the only one. :wink:
     
  5. FilmIs4Ever

    FilmIs4Ever Member

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    This is a mistake that I've never made, and taht you never should. It is so simple to tell developer and fixer apart. Put them in order on the table, check, double-check, and when in doubt check again.

    Film is too expensive to waste through carelessness. I'm a disorganized SOB, but NOT when it comes to soupling film.
     
  6. Mike Wilde

    Mike Wilde Member

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    different bottles help me here

    In B&W I keep developers in amber glass bottles, and if necessary, dilute into a measuring graduate before loading the film reels/holders.

    I use a water bath for a stop. The film tank stays in the water stop until I put the glass developer away up on the shelf above the sink, and then I bring the plastic fixer bottles down and pour it into the (rinsed) graduate.

    I also pour a small amount of the fixer - about 30ml maybe- into a little measuring cup, and drop the film leader for the film in just before I dump the graduate of fixer into the (now drained rinse water) tank.

    If I am suspect of the age of the fixer, or haven't used it for a while, pouring it into the graduate first lets me check for any sulfur beginning to precipitate. If it is just silver specks (as in what occur in PE's superfix formula) I filter though a coffee filter ahead of starting the developer.

    I got into the plastic bottle for fixer habbit because frequently my hands/gloves are wet by the time I get to fixing. Also when the sulfur drops out and plates to the bottle big time it is a lot easier to discard a well labelled recylced plastic pop bottle that was being used to store fix, than a hard to come by amber bottle.

    I also got into it becasue I have come close to doing exactly what you have done.
     
  7. selenium96

    selenium96 Member

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    I was discussing photo blunders and disasters with my daughter the other day and I had to confess that I did this once myself. It was somewhere around roll 200.
     
  8. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    Just take a sniff of what you pour in before you pour it in...that's how I prevent this, honestly. Most developer, and definitely fixer, have recognizable smells.

    :smile:

    2F/2F