#8 Yellow filter with colour film?

Discussion in 'Exposure Discussion' started by wackyvorlon, Jul 15, 2010.

  1. wackyvorlon

    wackyvorlon Member

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    I was wondering what effect a #8 yellow filter would have with colour film?
     
  2. smithy17

    smithy17 Member

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    Hmm, I suspect it will make the colours look more yellow. :surprised:
     
  3. asp.artist

    asp.artist Member

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    It turns the pics yellow. Tried it by mistake with a rangefinder. Not interesting.
     
  4. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    Me thinketh a urinated upon effect would be the result.
     
  5. MaximusM3

    MaximusM3 Member

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    Ugly..did that once by mistake..and converted them to b&w with Silver Efex to salvage.
     
  6. Jeff Kubach

    Jeff Kubach Member

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    It will look yellow, in some cases it might look good.

    Jeff
     
  7. fotch

    fotch Member

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    Duh :D
     
  8. Robert Budding

    Robert Budding Member

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    It will also darken blue colors.
     
  9. holmburgers

    holmburgers Member

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    I'm currently shooting a roll of tungsten film with a yellow filter. I'm thinking it will result in normal-ish looking colors, perhaps a bit warm. I saw evidence on flickr suggesting that this might actually result in pleasing photographs.... but we'll see.
     
  10. Q.G.

    Q.G. Inactive

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    You may still like the results, but normal-ish they will not be.
     
  11. erikg

    erikg Member

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    There are such filters: the 85 series, but they are more amber than yellow. Depending upon the actual color temp. of the light you are shooting in you can get a normal-ish result. Pleasing photographs... that is always possible depending on who is being pleased...
     
  12. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    You need a blue filter to correct tungsten film to daylight appearance. IIRC, there are three different ones depending on the temperture of available the light.
     
  13. holmburgers

    holmburgers Member

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    Well put. I don't have an 85 filter, hence this experiment.

    Now, Q.G., tell me this doesn't look normal-ish.. http://www.flickr.com/photos/tiffibunny/1158134056/ (not mine... Holga?... gimme a break... :D)

    And no, a blue filter would not be good with tungsten film outside. Unless you are attempting to simulate being underwater perhaps.
     
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  15. Q.G.

    Q.G. Inactive

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    If nothing else, always fun, experiments!

    I can't tell right now, because i'm at a computer with a broken monitor.
    It shows everything as if through a yellow filter... :D
    (True!)
     
  16. holmburgers

    holmburgers Member

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    hahaha! Try finding some pictures with a blue cast and they might just look normal to you.
     
  17. Darkroom317

    Darkroom317 Member

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    That's for Daylight film in tungsten light.
     
  18. Q.G.

    Q.G. Inactive

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    You'd think so, perhaps. But they only look dark.
    :wink:
     
  19. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    Thanks, I never use them, have one, but used it for fog enhancment and didnt care for the effect.
     
  20. Galah

    Galah Member

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    I have a 17/4 SMC Takumar M42 mount Fisheye lens with built in filters (UV, Red, and Yellow) for use with B&W film.

    Out of curiosity, I tried a couple of shots with the coloured filters using dayllight colour negative film.

    The results were not particularly pleasing and resembled what you might have expected from having attached some yellow or red cellophane in front of the lens.:sad:

    So, if wanting a pre-view, get come colured cellophane and look through it: what you see is what you'll get. :tongue:
     
  21. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    Out of fairness to color filters for B&W effects, you can use them for creative monotone prints. Try a red or orange at sunrise or sunset. Maybe a green filter with a dark forest scene or with a water scene. It drives color labs crazy trying to correct them.
     
  22. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    Tungsten film makes things very blue-cyan when shot in daylight...which is why they look normal when shot in tungsten light.

    The standard filter to "normalize" tungsten film for daylight is an 85 filter, which is pretty much orange.

    So, the yellow filter will likely take some of the blue away, but some blue, and plenty of green from the cyan will likely remain.

    If you want "normal" (meaning like a daylight-balanced film) results from tungsten films shot outdoors, the Wratten #85 is your filter.

    As for the OP: Please take a long, hard think about your question and I am sure you will come up with the answer. (Hint: It is extremely obvious. :D)
     
  23. Q.G.

    Q.G. Inactive

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    In this instance, the OP would need to put first an 80A filter, then a yellow filter on top of that on his lens to have a bit of a preview.
     
  24. benjiboy

    benjiboy Subscriber

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    If you use a yellow filter with colour film you get a very jaundiced view of The World :smile:
     
  25. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    I thought Kosh himself would know the answer! :smile:

    PE
     
  26. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    The yellow filter will help counter balance the pesky blue coating on flash bulbs. :tongue:

    Steve