85 filter?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by brofkand, Sep 10, 2008.

  1. brofkand

    brofkand Member

    Messages:
    514
    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2008
    Location:
    North Caroli
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Hey all,

    I went to Camera World (a camera store in Charlotte) to pick up some paper and other odds and ends.

    When I was there, I saw they had a wheel barrow filled with old filters. I only got one (the only one I saw that was 52mm). It is an 85 filter, and it is an orange color.

    There is no manual, and I can't seem to find anything about it online other than something about adjusting color temperature. What exactly does it do?

    I shoot B&W Film. Would this filter be of an use to me on B&W Film, or on a digital SLR?

    Thanks!
     
  2. DWThomas

    DWThomas Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,698
    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2006
    Location:
    SE Pennsylva
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    They are used to shoot tungsten film in daylight. There are actually several #85 for slightly different balance.

    From http://www.jackspcs.com/filters.htm

    You would have to experiment, but it might work about like an orange for black and white -- dunno, never tried it.

    DaveT
     
  3. Lee L

    Lee L Member

    Messages:
    3,246
    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2004
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    The standard B&W orange filter #21 or similar has a very sharp cut off, like other filters designed primarily for B&W. The Wratten 85 filters have a much more gradual slope, and are a color biasing rather than a cut off filter. The different 85 series filters just have variations on that more gradual slope, and won't increase color contrast nearly as dramatically as the orange, or even yellow B&W filters.

    Lee
     
  4. CBG

    CBG Member

    Messages:
    894
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2004
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    The 85 filters are designed for color film work, to match the color response of the film to the color of the ambient light.

    Regardless, an 85 filter will be usable for B+W contrast control. Just try it on a sunny day with clouds in the sky. Shoot pix with and without it. You'll see a change in the rendering of the sky. The blue of the sky will be darkened by the orange in the filter. The clouds will stand out more clearly, through the filter, against the tone of the sky. Without a contrast filter, the clouds will render a bit less differentiated from the sky.

    Try one stop compensation for light loss through the filter.

    C
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 10, 2008
  5. Lee L

    Lee L Member

    Messages:
    3,246
    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2004
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Tiffen's exposure adjustments:

    Filter / Conversion / Exposure increase

    85 5,500 to 3,400 K 2/3 stop
    85B 5,500 to 3,200 K 2/3 stop
    85C 5,500 to 3,800 K 1/3 stop

    Lee
     
  6. Mike Wilde

    Mike Wilde Member

    Messages:
    2,936
    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2006
    Location:
    Misissauaga
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Try it on portraiture

    I find with some ladies skin, an orange filter can work for lower key portraits. See if you like the effect.
     
  7. Lee L

    Lee L Member

    Messages:
    3,246
    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2004
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    The milder 81A, 81B, 81C series filters are usually preferred for skin tone improvement with color films, shifting only a few hundred degrees Kelvin rather than a couple of thousand degrees K.

    Lee
     
  8. nworth

    nworth Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,157
    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2005
    Location:
    Los Alamos,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Actually, the filter is salmon colored. It is used to expose Type A color film in daylight. Type A film is balanced for 3400K photofloods, and it is rarely, if ever, seen these days. The 85 is a less intense version of the 85B. These are light balancing filters, and they are not really designed for contrast work. They pass all colors, but they pass more light at the red end of the spectrum. An 85 would produce some darkening of the sky and lightening of the yellows and reds with black and white film, but not nearly as much as an orange filter, or even a deep yellow.