8x10 B&W film, ISO400 vs. ISO100

Discussion in 'Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by Richard Man, Jun 18, 2017.

  1. Richard Man

    Richard Man Subscriber

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    For my 4x5, my go to film is Portra 160 when using with strobes, and 400 otherwise. Occasionally I do use Ektar 100 and BW (Tmax 100, Acros 100)

    I am now starting on 8x10. Probably mostly shooting B&W to save on cost. I'd imagine 8x10 ISO400 should look pretty darn good enough (vis-a-vis ISO100)?
     
  2. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    This is not so much a technical question as it is what is the look that you want.
     
  3. Sperdynamite

    Sperdynamite Subscriber

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    It's less about speed in large format, and more about contrast. Grain is basically gone. So, the slower films will have a bit more snap to them, and 400 speed films will be smoother. IMO 8x10 HP5 or Delta 400 are just about the most versatile films you can shoot. Start with HP5, if you want (somehow) finer grain, shoot Delta 400. Want some snap to your film? FP4+!
     
  4. Sal Santamaura

    Sal Santamaura Member

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    Please let us know where to purchase that 8x10 Delta 400. :smile:
     
  5. Sperdynamite

    Sperdynamite Subscriber

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    Wow, you're right... Was it discontinued or simply never made in 8x10? I would say it's an oversight but maybe HP5 is 8x10 is sufficient...
     
  6. Andrew O'Neill

    Andrew O'Neill Subscriber

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    HP5 is their flagship film. Coating Delta 400 in sheet film sizes would compete probably negatively with it... HP5 is sufficient.
     
  7. Sal Santamaura

    Sal Santamaura Member

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    All sheet sizes of Delta 400 were discontinued 16 years ago.
     
  8. Alan9940

    Alan9940 Member

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    With 8x10, I've found that film speed can be an important consideration when shooting outdoor scenes. Why? Wind! Don't get me wrong...I shoot quite a bit of 100 speed 8x10 film, but will reach for a 400 speed film if conditions demand those couple extra stops. All other factors such as grain, etc, are IMO unnecessary to consider; look for a tonal scale that suits your subjects.

    Have fun!
     
  9. Andrew O'Neill

    Andrew O'Neill Subscriber

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    I love wind! I used to fight it, but now I love the movement of wheat, trees, etc... as long as my camera doesn't start bouncing around!:D
     
  10. jim10219

    jim10219 Member

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    If it's windy, even 400 speed film doesn't seem to be fast enough. To be fair, I do usually like to stop my lenses down pretty far for landscapes. So I just stick with 100 to keep my costs down.
     
  11. Peter Schrager

    Peter Schrager Subscriber

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    You want the best use TMY400..straight line film that makes great negatives and it's a true 400 speed film...kicks hp5...arse!