8x10 suggestions

Discussion in 'Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by vintagepics, Jul 14, 2012.

  1. vintagepics

    vintagepics Member

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    Im currently shooting a Eastman View No. 1 with a "no name" 12 inch lens. The combination actually fits me, but im limited to shooting extended exposure since I don't have a lens with a shutter. I simply use the lens cap as the shutter for long exposures. However I would like to get into shooting some faster speed films during the day. My question is, should I simply buy a lens with a Copal shutter, or upgrade the whole system? Im no pro, and will probably never have a showing, or sell my stuff, so cost is a bit of a factor. I would love any suggestions. Thanks
     
  2. Rob Skeoch

    Rob Skeoch Advertiser Advertiser

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    If you have to up-date the whole kit anyway... why not just start with the lens. Pick up a nice Fujinon 300mm C off ebay. You'll get great results on this camera, and can always use the lens down the road if you up-grade the whole thing.
     
  3. Tim Boehm

    Tim Boehm Subscriber

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    The Fujinon C series are great. Lots of coverage and small. The A series is also great, but the 240 barely covers an 8x10, and the 180 doesn't. I assume you're looking for a used 8x10. Just make sure it's functional. I once got an 8x10 Century Universal because it was cheap. Sure was, I had to use bungie cords to hold the back on. Try posting some "want to buy" messages here and at the azo forum http://www.michaelandpaula.com/mp/azoforum/default.asp
     
  4. desertrat

    desertrat Subscriber

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    You can put a Packard shutter behind your no-name lens. That will help keep costs down, and will give more versatility to what might be a perfectly good barrel lens.
     
  5. Tim Boehm

    Tim Boehm Subscriber

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    I should say that the Century Universal was a good camera, but the particular one I got had some rough years on it.
     
  6. vintagepics

    vintagepics Member

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    I’m very intrigued by the Packard set up. I have never heard of that. I think that would work with my lens, I would just have to figure out how to mount it to it. I have elements both behind, and in front of the lens board. The other question I would raise with the Packard is camera shake. I have not looked into it much, but it seems the Packard gets about a ¼ to 1/8 shutter speed, and the 2D is already a very shaky camera. Do you think that slow, clunky shutter would cause some lens shake?

    I also gave some erroneous information. It’s an Eastman 2D. The No. 1 is my 5x7 plate camera.
     
  7. Leigh B

    Leigh B Member

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    The Fujinon C 300/8.5 may not be the best choice for 8x10 due to its small image circle of 380mm (8x10 film diagonal is 325mm).

    That's one of the smallest ICs among 300mm lenses. Most are over 400mm. For example:
    Fujinon A 300/9 @ 420mm
    Nikkor W 300/5.6 @ 420mm
    Rodenstock Sironar-N 300/5.6 @ 425mm
    Rodenstock Apo-Sironar-W 300/5.6 @ 490mm

    OTOH, if your work only requires modest shifts, like landscapes or portraiture, the C might be a good choice due to its small size.

    - Leigh
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 14, 2012
  8. Jerevan

    Jerevan Subscriber

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    Run what you got, says the eternal change man (looking at himself in the mirror). Get a packard shutter if you like the lens you have. If you google Kodak 2D Packard shutter and look at the photos, you'll see a few variations on how to get it working.

    If you feel you need to change the lot, then go for a lens in a shutter. Just remember the 5.6 lenses are huge hulking beasts if you are hiking and moving the gear around.
     
  9. desertrat

    desertrat Subscriber

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    Some (most ?) Packards have one instantaneous shutter speed, around 1/25 second. I don't have a Packard, but am thinking about getting one. Hopefully someone here will tell us how to identify the ones that have the instantaneous setting. About camera shake, I use a Seneca, and I'm pretty sure it's not a very rigid camera compared to modern designs. I have a setup to minimize camera shake that involves an inexpensive contractor tripod and a homemade adapter that allows me to attach a large wooden board securely to the top of the tripod using its built in 5/8-11 screw. The setup is very rigid, and supports the entire camera bed. I think it supports the camera better than an adapter you can buy that only supports a circular area a few inches in diameter around the tripod fitting on the camera.

    I posted some pictures of the setup over at the LF forum:

    http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/showthread.php?81049
     
  10. ic-racer

    ic-racer Member

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    Something like the compact Fujinon C 300mm would be good for an old wooden camera. The coverage should match closely the limited range of movements available. I got the big Fujinon W 300 in copal 3 on my old Century and it was almost too heavy for that camera (see below). I had to bolt the lensboard to the camera to keep the lens from falling off. It caused me to buy a new 8x10 camera (as far as my wife knows) just so I could use the lens, but maybe that is the route you want to go also :smile:
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 14, 2012
  11. premortho

    premortho Member

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    :smile: For what it's worth, I've been using Packard shutters for 62 years I prefer the instantaneous type. They are easy to spot as the shutter frame has a hole on one side, and a small diameter extension on the back side. These three leaf shutters are drivin by air from a bulb and hose that goes through the lensboard to the shutter cylinder. They come in different sizes for different diameter lenses. The larger shutters inst. speed is about 1/15 second. They are very simple to mount. If the lens sticks out in back of the lensboard, make a 1/2 inch box to mount the lens in front of the lensboard, with the Packard in back of the lensboard. I use them because they don't shake the camera. Packard shutters are still being made.:whistling:
     
  12. LJH

    LJH Member

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    If you have to go to the trouble of mounting a Packard, then perhaps you should also consider a Sinar shutter.

    Just as much hassle to mount, but you get the advantage of shutter speeds from 1/60th to 8 seconds.

    So much more useful than a Packard in my opinion.

    I guess you'd need to work out if you will continue using barrel lenses in future if you need to justify the price (circa $300), or whether you can get by with a Copal et al mounted lens for the same price.
     
  13. John Kasaian

    John Kasaian Member

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    If you kit works well for you, why change cameras? If you want a shutter, there are plenty of 8x10 lens out there that won't break the bank. You can even have your lens mounted in front of a shutter but the machining required might approach the cost of a second lens. Packard lenses work, but I fret over drilling that extra hole in a good lensboard.
    IMHO get a second lens in a shutter (after all, you've got a legit excuse!)
     
  14. vintagepics

    vintagepics Member

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