A genious way of packing and carying a monorail?

Discussion in 'Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by Soeren, Nov 1, 2007.

  1. Soeren

    Soeren Member

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    Hi all
    Now I have this Sinar Id like to take it out shooting.
    Anyone found a genious way of packing and carying a monorail camera lenses and filmholder?
    Should I get some lenscaps for my lenses?
    Kind regards
    Søren
     
  2. David H. Bebbington

    David H. Bebbington Inactive

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    Lenscaps - absolutely. Impossible to pack lenses without these and avoid damage.

    One of the most compact ways to carry camera gear is to buy padded stuff sacks (I have several of the "Gara Gear" brand) and partially dismantle your camera and put the parts in the sacks. In the case of a monorail, you could leave the front and rear standards together, even leave the lens on (with a cap), but remove the monorail and rail clamp. The camera would then go into a normal rucksack inside the padded bag, you might even not need another bag for the rail and clamp. Beware of filmholders - any point loading on the darkslides (sheaths) and they will break. When I was shooting 4x5", I bough a padded bag from the "Mother & Baby" section of a supermarket which cost about £6.99 and held six filmholders.

    Regards,

    David
     
  3. Struan Gray

    Struan Gray Member

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    I can't remember if your snag haul included a six inch rail or not, but if you don't have one, get one. Then you just compress everything onto the short rail, wrap it in your darkcloth and stow it in any convenient bag.
     
  4. brimc76

    brimc76 Member

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    I use to use a camping cooler which I had lined with foam blocks for support. It keeps everything from extreme temps and was pretty easy to carry with one big handle on top and the top made a great table too. It was probably not the best solution but worked quite well for me.
     
  5. bdial

    bdial Subscriber

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    I use a monorail camera. For storage and basic transport I use a duffle bag with foam in the bottom. For shooting the camera stays on the tripod which I carry over my shoulder and I carry film holders and lenses in a small camera bag. This arrangement works well for me, for anything up to a few Km of walking.
     
  6. Soeren

    Soeren Member

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    It came with a 30cm rail as the shortest one so the 15cm is on my wishlist.
    Darkcloth? Wishlist too :smile: For the moment I use a slazenger raincoat but I guess I have to make something more apropriate.
    Ill be carying it in wideangle mode with the 90mm and 150mm + 4-8 dd, Minolta spotmeter F and a Mannfrotto 055 tripod.
    Kind regards
    Søren
     
  7. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Compressing it on a short rail is the sturdiest and most compact method--best for a backpack.

    Another alternative that works well with a shoulder bag is to unclip the bellows from one side and fold the standard all the way in, parallel to the rail. Raise the other standard and fold it over the standard that is already folded down with the bellows in the middle.

    In a flat case like a briefcase, unclip the bellows from one side and swing both standards so that the standards and rail are all in a single plane.

    This all assumes you're using an F/1/2, A, or Alpina.
     
  8. jovo

    jovo Membership Council Council

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    For those who try to do this with a Toyo or Omega monorail, getting a short (like just a few inches) rail to allow it to fit in a bag or backpack is a problem. What works for me is a cut-to-size piece of PVC pipe (1.5") wrapped with a piece of packing tape ('cause it's smoother than duck tape) to bring it up to the equivalent metric diameter, I remove the regular rail, and insert the PVC in the standards and tripod hole to keep the camera together, and the rail fits nicely alongside the the camera.
     
  9. GeorgesGiralt

    GeorgesGiralt Member

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    Hi Søren
    Have a look at this pict :
    http://img78.imageshack.us/img78/3955/normawebrz7.jpg
    It's form a French photographer using it's Norma 8x10 in the filed packed in a Decathlon rope backpack (for people climbing...) to pack it up.
    The backpack is nice, cost about 50 € and has a removable sheet of plastic which is usefull to lay on the grass before unpacking cable releases or filters... Last but not least, it open from the back, so you won't put the part which goes on your back into the mud or wet grass....
    I own one, just missing the 8x10 Norma back and bellows ;-)
    P.S. the lens case is made from plywood glued and nailed.
     
  10. philldresser

    philldresser Subscriber

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    This is basically the same format I use to carry around my Cambo outfit albiet 5x4. I only have the 30cm rail which fits nicely into the case top. My carry case also has two pockets on the outside for my spot meter and loupe. Darkcloth goes inside between the standards. I also can get around six holders in.

    Other benefits are it has wheels and backpack straps

    Phill

    Phill
     
  11. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    That's a pretty neat setup for carrying the 8x10" Norma, bearing in mind that there are no filmholders in the pack. I don't think I'd want to be lugging my 8x10" Sinar P on my back.
     
  12. Jim Noel

    Jim Noel Member

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    Packing the Sinar is a snap. Disconnect the bellows at one end. Rotate the front and rear standards until they are parallel to the rail, lock them down and place in a padded backpack. My Norma has many miles on it this way. When being transported in the car it is in its original hard case.
     
  13. Soeren

    Soeren Member

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    Yep, thats the genious way :tongue: I have been looking for backpacks that will zip all the way but most of don't. What kind of pack is tha? where do I get one.
    Kind regards
    Søren
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 1, 2007
  14. jp80874

    jp80874 Subscriber

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    Søren,

    How rough is the terrain that you will travel? If it is climbing I can’t help you. If trails and fields you might look at a babyjogger. http://babyjogger.com/performancesingle.htm Mine has 20 inch wheels and 100 pound capacity shock absorbers. I bought it to carry my Technikardan 45, but it has worked as I moved up to 8x10 and 7x17. The film holders go under the seat. A bag of lenses and stuff goes in the seat. The camera mounted on the tripod rests on top with tripod spikes through the foot plate and camera held in place with bungy cord.

    An alternative is a bicycle trailer. http://babyjogger.com/trailermain.htm
    I chose the jogger because the bike speed and distance is a little too hard on the Labrador Retriever who goes as my assistant and body guard while under the cloth.

    John Powers
     
  15. Soeren

    Soeren Member

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    John
    How about a Husky :smile:
    Well in fact we do have a bicycle trailer, a Burley D'lite, and I'm planing to use that for town tours. actually a front wheel can be mounted making it a baby jogger
    The terrain here in Dk is relatively flat (except for "Moens klint") but we may encounter narrow tracks and places unsuitable for wheeled carriages + There might not be room for such equipment when driving to more remote locations.
    Kind regards
    Søren
     
  16. RobertP

    RobertP Subscriber

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    I just get the local University's cheerleading squad to carry everything. :smile:
     
  17. Jim Noel

    Jim Noel Member

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    My pack is an internal frame pack made for camping/hiking. I have had it several years. I have another similar which will zip closed with my 7x17 Korona. They were not made for cameras, but for clothes, etc.
     
  18. raizans

    raizans Member

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    i was tickled by the the thought of carrying my new monorail in a leather catalog case. detach the bellows, swing the standards flat, and put it all in a snazzy korchmar. :D
     
  19. GeorgesGiralt

    GeorgesGiralt Member

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    Hi Søren!
    The Decathlon brand has many shops in different countries. Have a look here :
    http://www.decathlon.com/new/en/010_home/10-10_home.html
    The bag is the Vuarde it is made in two sizes, the 30 liters which is nice for a Norma in 4x5 (I've to test it in 5x7) and in 40 liters size, which is the one pictured above with the Norma in 8x10.
    http://www.decathlon.fr/FR/vuarde-30-3106709/
    Hope this helps !
    BTW, I'm unable to store the Norma with it's two standards one above the other on the base rail. In my 5x4, either the rear standard or the front one are at an acute angle, and in the case of the rear standard, it touches the front one on a single line making me anxious about the wear and longevity of the paint.
    I really prefer to assemble it on the shortest rail availlale with the bellow totally compressed. it is a really small package ! Of course, one can buy the original Sinar case and the backstrap device making it into a backpack ....
     
  20. Soeren

    Soeren Member

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    Thanks George
    That was what I was looking for. Now I also have the Vuarde 40 on my wishlist.
    Kind regards
    Søren
     
  21. Struan Gray

    Struan Gray Member

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    Just to reiterate what Georges said: with the Norma it doesn't really work to try and fold the standards down onto the rail. That trick works best with the F and P Sinars where the tilt axis moves when you rise.

    Also, if you go into most climbing stores (or websites) and ask for rope-carrying packs or bags, they will show/sell you something much more basic than the Vuarde packs. Dont' buy blind.

    Finally, I use my 150 and 90 mm lenses on only the 15 cm rail most of the time. With the focussing track on the standards you can get another 60 mm, and if that's not quite enough a rail cap gives you another 30. I carry a 30 cm rail too, but only use it for longer lenses or closeups. If you know you are only going to use those two focal lengths you can put on the bag bellows and just take the 6" rail.
     
  22. Soeren

    Soeren Member

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    Yeah I found that out quite early after buying it. Since the shortest rail I have for the moment is the 30 cm I am forced to take it off the standards when packing and thats anoying.

    Im not sure I understand what you mean here. Don't buy without trying it out first? Id like a pack thats somewhat rigid and doesn't sack. It would be nice if it zips all the way down when opening it so...

    Well, thats the only focallenghts I've got for the moment. :smile: Actually your setup is quite similar to mine except perhaps from the format. I have the bag bellows on the camera and ai am using my shortest rail.
    How do you pack your lenses and darkslides?
    Kind Regards
    Søren
     
  23. Struan Gray

    Struan Gray Member

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    One trick not yet mentioned is to loosen the rail carrier locks enough that you can just slide both standards off their respective end rails, leaving the rail attached to the tripod head. You can then either pack them loose, which works surprisingly well if you have a semi-rigid compartment the right size, or you can use a short section of PVC pipe in place of the rail to stop the standards rattling about.

    It's just that most things sold as rope bags are not proper backpacks, but are more like a groundsheet or tarpaulin that rolls up round the rope to form a holdall-style carrier. No use at all for carrying a camera. See REI's selection here:

    http://www.rei.com/search?vcat=REI_SEARCH&query=rope+bag


    I carry a single-lens-and-all-my-film kit in a samsonite shoulder bag. I can carry this around in civilised areas along with a tripod slung over my other shoulder with a climbing sling for a strap. If I want more lenses, or am taking a long lens kit (more rail, extra bellows, intermediate standard) they go in seperate bags and everything gets dumped into my old expedition pack with the tripod strapped on the side.

    I have my lenses on Technika boards and carry them in a Gnass lens case. Before I got the Gnass case I used Ikea food containers, and for lenses on the big Sinar boards I used clunky old 5.25" floppy disk storage cases.

    All my film goes in the shoulder bag. I usually take 4x5 in the Fuji Quickchange cartridges, which I reload myself. These let me carry 30-odd sheets of film in a compact and lightweight way, but without the expense of Quickloads. It's hard to build a Quickchange system today, but you could do the same with Graphmatics.