A good but simple light meter - suggestions?

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by Digidurst, Mar 13, 2005.

  1. Digidurst

    Digidurst Subscriber

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    Hi everyone! I have just obtained a Mamiya 330f (what a beauty!) and I also have an old Graflex 22 (that my son has taken an interest in) as well as a few very old 35mm's that I like to shoot with.
    So, I'm looking for a good but simple and cheap ambient light meter that I can I use with my old cameras and I'd like to teach my 8 yr. old son to use it too. Any suggestions?

    Thanks in advance :smile:
     
  2. BradS

    BradS Subscriber

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    Gossen Luna Pro Digital.
     
  3. Digidurst

    Digidurst Subscriber

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    Hmmm... I was thinking that maybe an analog one would be easier for the kiddo to deal with.
     
  4. MenacingTourist

    MenacingTourist Member

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    For my general light meter needs (mainly in the studio) I use a Polaris. Got it cheap on eBay and has performed will metering for my Mamiya RB67.

    Good luck :smile:
     
  5. photomc

    photomc Member

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    I can add recommendation for the Polaris, plus it can be made into a semi-spot with a $50 attachment. That said there is nothing as simple or cheap as a good old gossen luna pilot. No batteries, no fuss just point it and take a reading..and it should be found under$50 - though I haven't priced one in years. It was the first meter I owned, still have it and it is nice and small.
     
  6. Digidurst

    Digidurst Subscriber

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    Mike, that sounds like just what I need - thanks!
     
  7. papagene

    papagene Membership Council Council

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    A Gossen Scout II is also a light, cheap with no batteries light meter. I paid $40.00 for mine years ago. And it still works fine (as a back up to my Luna Pro F).
    You might be able to find a Scout used on ebay.
    Good luck.

    gene
     
  8. joeyk49

    joeyk49 Member

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    I'll second the prior motions on the Gossen stuff.

    I picked up a Lunasix last summer (less than $30.00 on ebay). Its my first light meter, so I wanted to keep it simple. I love the thing!
    I had never used one nor seen one used and it didn't come with directions.

    So, what did I do? I asked someone here and quickly got some great tips and a website referral.That website had the entire instruction manual posted. Bingo and Parchese, I was in business...

    I wish I had been introduced to decent cameras when I was younger, instead of cranking out terribly exposed vignetted instamatic junk.

    Good luck and remember to have lots of fun teaching and shooting with your son.
     
  9. L Gebhardt

    L Gebhardt Subscriber

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    I would avoid the meters without batteries. I have a Gossen Scout 3 and it is not at all accurate or consistent except in full daylight. Don't saddle him with a meter that doesn't meter well. I am in favor of no batteries, but not at the expense of accuracy.
     
  10. Donald Qualls

    Donald Qualls Member

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    I have a Gossen Sixtomat selenium meter that was old when I got it, with a camera purchase, not quite 35 years ago. It's still easily within 1/2 stop, and will meter well in light conditions down about f/2.8 @ 1/30 on EI 400 (though, being older, it doesn't have EI settings higher than 400 -- not a huge handicap, since it's easy to set it one or two stops lower than the film speed and compensate, if necessary). Yes, a silicon blue cell will meter in lower light, probably 4-5 stops lower. No, I don't often shoot in light like that, and when I do, I can usually make do with an exposure guide (the CdS meter in my Spottie doesn't go more than a stop or so dimmer than the Sixtomat anyway).

    These days, if you can find one, a Sixtomat shouldn't set you back as much as $20. If it works at all, it should be accurate. It also has an incident cover, BTW.
     
  11. mark

    mark Member

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    Here is a plug for the Luna Pro. SUper simple.
     
  12. gr82bart

    gr82bart Subscriber

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    I have a Sekonic 358.

    Art.
     
  13. Digidurst

    Digidurst Subscriber

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    Yes, I have one of those as well. Great for the studio and/or my personal work but I'm looking for a simpler model that my son can get along with and that won't be a big deal to loose, break, etc.

    The above suggestions for the various Gossen models have been great - thanks!
     
  14. Silverpixels5

    Silverpixels5 Member

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    I have a Minolta Auto-Spot II with a case if you're interested. I've been holding on to it for who knows how long as a backup meter, but I really don't see myself using it. Its of course analog, with the dial in the viewfinder. Gives the same exposures as my new digital spot meter.
     
  15. Digidurst

    Digidurst Subscriber

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    Sounds interesting... I'll PM you about it.
     
  16. Nancy Giroux

    Nancy Giroux Member

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    I also have a sekonic L358. I'm wondering if anyone can tell me weather the dome should be in or out when I am shooting landscapes with my Bronica.
    Thanks
    Nancy
     
  17. Digidurst

    Digidurst Subscriber

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    The Sekonic USA site seems to be down right now (maybe for maintainance?) but I do remember there being a very helpful Q&A forum there. Also, and I'm not trying to be a smart ass here, but have you read your manual?
     
  18. rjr

    rjr Member

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    Nancy,

    it´s the same for most lightmeters:

    for incident metering the dome should be "in", for spot or reflective readings you remove it.

    It depends on your style and your experience - I usually resort to incident metering in most cases.
     
  19. Nancy Giroux

    Nancy Giroux Member

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    What's a manual? LOL
    I have read it, but not for quite a while. I usually shoot people, so I have the dome out. I'll pick it up and refresh my memory. Thanks!
    Nancy
     
  20. Blighty

    Blighty Subscriber

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    Digidurst,
    Congrats! The Mamiya C330f is the best of the bunch (IMO). I reckon a Gossen Profisix would suit you admirably. They're not made anymore so I reckon you should be able to get one fairly cheap. They are extremely reliable, durable and easy to use (a bit like your Mamiya). I've been using a profisix for 20 years and it's seen a lot of action. You can buy lots of different attachments to turn it into spotmeter, flashmeter, colour temp. meter etc. It has an incident metering diffuser built-in and if that wasn't enough, the later models incorporate a zone system numeral scale, should you wish to go down that road. Regards, BLIGHTY
     
  21. Digidurst

    Digidurst Subscriber

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    Thank you! I haven't had much chance to use it yet as I've been busy setting up space to do alt. process stuff and my house won't clean itself (dang it!) but man, he (yeah, I think my Mamiya's a 'he') is one hunk of gorgeous camera! I've been scouting locations while running my errands so it won't be long before I put 'him' thru his paces :smile:
     
  22. paul ron

    paul ron Member

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  23. Digidurst

    Digidurst Subscriber

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    Thanks Paul!