a question about rollei retro 80s and asa

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by stickfeller, Oct 29, 2013.

  1. stickfeller

    stickfeller Member

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    although im a hardcore noob to photography, im having a great time shooting film, processing and printing... im learning so much!
    in retrospect, i should have checked the data sheets first, but i loaded my ae-1 prog. with the 80s and since there is no asa notch between 50 and 100, i left it at 50, having just shot a roll if ilford panf plus. the developer i have is ilford dd-x. but the only info on development times i can find are for 80 and 100 EI, ive only shot 8 images, 6 landscapes with an IR filter, and 2 portraits... should i move the notch on the cam to 100 and develop in kind, or should i keep shooting at 50 and develop for less time than the 80 iso. i could really use some advice. thanks...

    Nick
     
  2. PhotoJim

    PhotoJim Member

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    There are notches between 50 and 100, they just aren't labelled. One tick past 50 is 64; two ticks past 50 (or one before 100) is 80.
     
  3. stickfeller

    stickfeller Member

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    thank you!!!
     
  4. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    And the shots taken at 50 will probably be fine.
     
  5. polyglot

    polyglot Member

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    Develop as per 50, it will be completely fine. A 2/3 stop exposure will probably be a good thing.
     
  6. Regular Rod

    Regular Rod Member

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    The only danger you have is that bright highlights may get blocked by normal development. Your best chance for success is to use a compensating developer with a semi-stand regime for agitation. If I was developing your film with the mix of exposures on it, I'd choose OBSIDIAN AQUA diluted 1:500 and develop for 12 minutes at 20 deg. C and use it after the film has had a two minute pre-soak in tap water at the same temperature, the developer would be agitated with inversions constantly for the first full minute and then just four inversion every two minutes thereafter leaving the film un-agitated for the last full minute of the 12 minutes. Stop bath would be two changes of tap water at 20 deg. C and Ilford Rapid Fixer would be then use for 5 full minutes. Washing would be by the Ilford recommended method with 0.5ml of Mirasol wetting agent in a final static rinse/soak for 2 minutes. The film would then be hung up to dry with a weighted clip on the lower end. The semi-stand agitation will, to quite a large extent, protect your highlights from blocking.


    RR
     
  7. MartinP

    MartinP Member

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    As mentioned earlier in the thread, simply move the film-speed dial to two 'clicks' above the 50 setting. Although there are no numbers between 50 and 100, there should be 'click' settings.

    When you come to development, use your DDX and develop the roll with the times for ISO80. The differences in highlights will be fairly minimal for the shots you've already made, especially as the IR exposures are an approximation anyway (as light-meters can't measure IR 'light').
     
  8. PhotoJim

    PhotoJim Member

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    And for your future reference:

    12 16 20 25 32 40 50 64 80 100 125 160 200 250 320 400 500 640 800 1000 1250 1600 2000 2500 3200

    The bold-faced ones are the ones you will see on your dial. The standard font ones are the ticks that are in between.

    Notice that every number has a double 3 to the right and its half three to the left (some are slightly rounded for convenience, e.g. 125 should really be 128). That will help you remember it, if you can just remember one or two sets of the numbers.