A question about Sodium carbonate

Discussion in 'Alternative Processes' started by UKJohn, Jan 21, 2007.

  1. UKJohn

    UKJohn Subscriber

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    Hi,

    I am planning to have a crack at salt printing tomorrow however, I have noticed whilst sorting the various chemicals out that I have Sodium Carnonate rather than Sodium Chloride :confused: .

    Having searched and read a few threads and had a look on the web, I have doubts about using Sodium Carbonate. Before I dash out and purchase some Sea Salt I was wondering whether Sodium Carbonate can actually be used in place of Sodium Chloride? Has anyone had any experience of this?

    Cheers John
     
  2. Ole

    Ole Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    No, you can't.

    The sodium doesn't matter, what you need is chloride. You can substitute ammonium chloride, potassium chloride, seawater, sea salt, table salt, or even hydrochloric acid.

    You really mean you have no salt at all in the house???
     
  3. UKJohn

    UKJohn Subscriber

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    Hi Ole,

    Thanks for your response, you have confirmed what I thought, which is great. I believed that I had ordered Sodium Chloride but obviously not. My mistake :mad:

    Unfortunately I have table salt but not Sea Salt so down the supermarket I will have to go.

    Once again many thanks.

    John
     
  4. Ole

    Ole Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Table salt works. Some of it contains iodide, wihch is not what you want. The "low sodium salt" that's so popular isn't so good either (doesn't taste right either, IMO), but should actually work.

    Sea salt is often purer (no additives), which is why it's recommended.

    What you really need is something containing sodium chloride and as little as possible of anything else. This is more for repeatability than because the process actually needs pure salt. As I said, seawater works fine with a little dilution (how much depends on where you are). Seawater contains a lot of other salts too, not just sodium chloride!
     
  5. Neil Miller

    Neil Miller Member

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    Kosher salt is good - no additives.

    Regards,
    Neil
     
  6. UKJohn

    UKJohn Subscriber

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    Thanks gents for your advise its much appreciated.

    Cheers

    John
     
  7. Justin Cormack

    Justin Cormack Member

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    kosher salt is not widely available in the UK. Avoid anything "free flowing" as that has additives, but plain sea salt is pretty widely available.

    Just reading the James Reilly salt and albumen book and want to make more, but the sun is no use here. I might ferment some albumen though...
     
  8. Neil Miller

    Neil Miller Member

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    Not too widely available, I agree, but I live nr Southend in the UK and my jewish friend just picked it up from wherever she shops. I expect anywhere there is a large jewish community is the place to look.

    Regards,
    Neil