Academic Research about Analog Photography and Film Scanners

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous Equipment' started by fschiav, Jan 29, 2013.

  1. fschiav

    fschiav Member

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    Dear APUG Members,


    My name is Francesco Schiavone (www.francescoschiavone.it). I am an Italian assistant professor in Management. I do research on reactions to technological change by old products' users. To this end, I would perform an interview (by email) to 4-5 key members of the APUG community about analogue cameras and the role of film scanners to make them alive. Would anyone of you reply to a short open questionnaire? If so, please send me an email to franz.schiavone@gmail.com and I will send you back the questionnaire. Another option is to dowload it (attached to this message) and send it back to me to my email address.



    Thanks for the kind attention and collaboration!


    PS: Sean Ross supports and is ok with my project! :smile:






    Best Regards
    Francesco
     

    Attached Files:

  2. AgX

    AgX Member

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    Welcome to Apug!

    Could you explain the meaning of your question:

    "What about the set of complementary goods of film cameras (e.g. minor effectiveness of film scanners in slowing their disappearance from the market)?"
     
  3. AgX

    AgX Member

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    You investigate on the impact of technology an a photographers community, and by this aim your questionaire seemingly at someone having insight on such a community (Q1).

    What about those photographers who do not make part of any community?

    In case you refer with "community" at the aggregate of analogue photographers I doubt a person as considered in Q1 could give a representative reflection on the situation.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 29, 2013
  4. fschiav

    fschiav Member

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    Dear AgX,
    thanks a lot! The meaning of the question is this: I want to know if, according to your opinion, the fact that the transition to digital photography was very fast and "disruptive" made film scanners less useful for the survival of the technological system "surrounding" analogue cameras? Feel free to think about any possible connection (that you can explain) between ditigal imaging, film scanners and the "analogue world" (except analogue cameras).

    thanks again!

    Francesco
     
  5. fschiav

    fschiav Member

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    I use the word community in a broad way, for both the cases you mention: photographers that feel themselves as members of the "community" and simple photographers.

    The goal of this study is to understand the impact of a conversion device on the base of users and the set of complementary goods of an old declining technology. Therefore, both the types of users could provide me interesting reflections for my analysis.
     
  6. HowardDvorin

    HowardDvorin Member

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    Francesco,

    As a photographer of long standing ,I resent the implication that film photography is "old and declining."

    It is very much alive in many many places and used by many photographers In fact, I venture to say that most of the
    APUG community uses the"old and declining" process.

    Even in the computer age,people still use lead pencils.

    Howard Dvorin
     
  7. fschiav

    fschiav Member

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    Dear Howard,

    I agree with you. I know that and for this reason I am very interested in analysing film technology (as already I did for other tech). So please, reply to my questionnaire so that I can develop this (and forthcoming) research on this subject. If you want know about my studies about "old and declining" technologies, send me an email and I will send you some papers.


    PS: FYI, my preferred product are my "old and declining" analogue turntables :smile:


    Best
    Francesco
     
  8. sehrgut

    sehrgut Member

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    Chill . . . Easy on the Italian guy. I don't think he meant so many shades of derogatory meaning: English is likely his second meaning. In the denotative sense, film is both old (it's been around a while) and declining (fewer practitioners and producers): I'm sure he only meant that, which is a challenge we all face, as shown by the many discussions on related topics here at APUG.

    Resent all you want: the fact is that film is, objectively-speaking, both old and declining.
     
  9. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    I prefer "mature and consolidating" :wink:
     
  10. cliveh

    cliveh Subscriber

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    How do scanners make analogue cameras alive?
     
  11. fschiav

    fschiav Member

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    thank you! you perfectly understood what I meant! Grazie :smile:
     
  12. fschiav

    fschiav Member

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    Hi, in the sense that film scanner improves somehow the performance of analogue cameras (more possible applications of its output). Therefore, film scanners make easier and more convenient the use of film technology still nowadays.
     
  13. msbarnes

    msbarnes Member

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    For some of us younger folks, it helps. a lot. Admittingly, I do not know if I would have taken part of "analog" (I really hate that word...) photography if this were not available. I know many other photographers would feel the same way. Maybe not the majority but there are some that bank on scanning: professional and hobbyists alike. This age is about digital.

    Ironnically, I want to stop scanning! After wet printing I'm beginning to appreciate what photography is about: prints!
     
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  15. sehrgut

    sehrgut Member

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    I agree with msbarnes: scanning allowed me to get into analogue photography when I otherwise wouldn't have been able to. Without appropriate space for a darkroom, I had the choice to keep using my DSLR as my sole camera, rededicate a large part of my apartment to a hobby I wasn't at that time sure I'd stick with, or scan the negatives.

    I'm ever so glad I decided to scan: especially since improving scan technology means that digital images' resolution is fixed when the photograph is taken, but my photos keep getting better and better resolution as time goes by.
     
  16. ME Super

    ME Super Member

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    Naw... I can get a good-enough color print from that other capture method. Projection's where it's at :D, and film is better at being projected than digital. For B&W (which I haven't done much of, but am warming up to it slowly), film is definitely more pleasing to my eye than the other capture method followed by post-capture conversion.
     
  17. Chan Tran

    Chan Tran Member

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    I would like to participate but I have trouble understand many of your questions.
     
  18. fschiav

    fschiav Member

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    write me an email and I will reply to you explaining the questions you do not understand
     
  19. RalphLambrecht

    RalphLambrecht Subscriber

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    and so are we
     
  20. Chan Tran

    Chan Tran Member

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    Some of us are just in denial.
     
  21. EASmithV

    EASmithV Member

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    Hybrid workflows are essential for some of us who do not have space for a darkroom (or a good one at any rate).

    Especially when it comes to color work. When it comes to slides, scanning and projecting are really the only (practical) options left, unless you find someone who has both the material and skill to make a decent ilfochrome. For me, film scanners are really great for proofing, and if I have an image that I love, I print it. But when it comes to color, I just cannot have the set up at this time to wet print RA4. So yes, if it were not for film scanners, many more people would have to use digital out of practical necessity. And even if they didn't, most mini-lab prints are scanned and made digitally anyway. So digital/scanners are still involved. I don't imagine i'm the only one in this situation, so for everyone like me who shoots color, we are slowing the decline of color materials, and contributing to film sales. By extension of this, I would conclude that scanners are in fact, helping film sales.
     
  22. fschiav

    fschiav Member

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    very interesting reply, thanks!
     
  23. Alan Johnson

    Alan Johnson Subscriber

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  24. Chan Tran

    Chan Tran Member

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    Although I don't own any of the ION stuff but they seem not of good quality but may be I am wrong.
     
  25. sehrgut

    sehrgut Member

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    They're good for what they are: consumer digitisation tools. Their turntables where their first product to hit the mainstream ("geekstream"?): audiophiles cringed, but thousands of iPod-wielders actually started listening to music they only owned on vinyl. Same with the cassette deck. We all know what a pain film digitisation is. Ion's market is analogue media that would otherwise become or remain inaccessible (or at least unaccessed). It's not archival, but it's not meant to be.

    Do I own any Ion products? No, and I have no desire to. I think all of us here demand archival quality from hybrid workflows. However, Ion is not courting us as customers: they're courting the people who are choosing between "throw away all of the old negatives" and "scan the old negatives before we throw them away".
     
  26. Alan Johnson

    Alan Johnson Subscriber

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    IIRC the Lomography people used about 2 millon films last year.Some of the Ion gadgets not listedon that site are now 9mpx.This passes under APUG radar as they tend to hang out on flikr but it is a a significant use of new film.