ACROS EI 25 test

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by dpurdy, Dec 19, 2007.

  1. dpurdy

    dpurdy Member

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    http://dennispurdy.com/ACROS 25 test.html

    I don't expect to rock anyones world with this but just in case someone might be curious I posted this result of an ACROS shot at 25 test.

    My black cat (named DMax) lying in blazing July sun on a white window sill.

    And the piano which is in a very dark room and is lit by the quartz halogen light that I turned up a bit to hit the white edges of the music books. Same roll of film as the kitty.

    Processed to proper density in Beutlers and printed on foma WT.
     
  2. Michel Hardy-Vallée

    Michel Hardy-Vallée Membership Council Council

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    You got me intrigued: what film format did you use? I suppose that by shooting at EI 25 and your dev time you are achieving a strong N-2 or -3 for reducing contrast?

    The range of contrast you are fitting on the film is impressive. It's beautiful in the first picture. I can just smell the summer air and hear the birds your cat is fixing.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 19, 2007
  3. highpeak

    highpeak Member

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    Wow, awesome tones! DMax, that's a good name:smile:
    Looks like you found your magic bullet!

    Alex W.
     
  4. kjsphoto

    kjsphoto Subscriber

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    I have zone tested this film a lot and it ends up normally begin rated at around 32 for N in Rodinal. Depending on the developer your index sounds about right.
     
  5. dpurdy

    dpurdy Member

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    mhv, the film is 120 shot with a Rollei. kj, I actually get 50 out of it with my tests but I wanted to see just how flat it would look if I pulled it a stop. The Beutler's developer is good for that. I don't know how it looks on your monitors but the prints don't feel flat or unusual at all. If I was going to shoot a bunch of bright sunlit landscapes I might shoot it this way as standard.
     
  6. nworth

    nworth Subscriber

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    Interesting. Sharp lines but soft tones. That's the traditional Beutler look, although these shots are a quite a bit softer than I remember from KB-14 in the old days. The silky fine, even tones of this film are certainly interesting. Although I can't tell from the posted picture, my guess is that it has invisible grain, too.
     
  7. Tom Hoskinson

    Tom Hoskinson Member

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    Very Nice, Dennis!

    Which Beutler Recipe did you use?
     
  8. dpurdy

    dpurdy Member

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    Hi Tom, I use the one with 10 grams Metol and 50 grams sodium sulfite in A and 50 grams sodium carbonate in B. Then I add the potassium Iodide independently when mixing the working solution which I dilute 8 to 1. I have a different formula somewhere in a book but I think it is very close to the same.
    Dennis
     
  9. Tom Hoskinson

    Tom Hoskinson Member

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    Dennis, Your recipe is pretty close to Crawley's FX-1 formulation
     
  10. dpurdy

    dpurdy Member

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    Yes it is pretty much the same, as well as Neofin-blue. I am getting ready to do some side by side testing of beutlers and Rodinal 50 to 1. I am thinking that maybe the sharpness and compensating affect is nearly as good with the Rodinal but with the added benifit beautifully glowing whites. I sometimes think the whites with the beutlers are a bit muggy (for lack of a better word) especially if you keep the densities down.
    Dennis
     
  11. athanasius80

    athanasius80 Member

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    Please keep us posted, I love the look you're getting.
     
  12. Russ Young

    Russ Young Member

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    Looks like a very worthwhile experiment. I'm impressed by the detail in the books... May dig out my old Crawley's info and do a little mixing myself.

    It's +13F here right now and when I saw that open window it gave me a shudder.

    Thanks.
    Russ
     
  13. dpurdy

    dpurdy Member

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    My experience with New Mexico is that it is a stunning beautiful place aside from Albuqueque. Some long johns and a pair of gloves and it's a great place for photography. Right now the cat isn't sitting in the window, she is curled up under the electric blanket.
    Dennis

    The beutlers is definitely worth working with since it is a very inexpensive developer and gives a very noticable increase in sharpness. The increase in sharpness is somewhat dependent on using the developer as a compensating developer. Don't over process and don't over agitate.
     
  14. pentaxuser

    pentaxuser Subscriber

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    To get detail in the cat's paw pads, given its colour and the light is really amazing. In fact full detail everywhere. A real coup

    pentaxuser