ACROS Name?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by RattyMouse, Aug 8, 2012.

  1. RattyMouse

    RattyMouse Subscriber

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    What does the name ACROS mean for Fujifilm's b & w film? I assume that the Neopan name is their brand for black and white, but what does ACROS signify? Stupid question but I want to know.
     
  2. john_s

    john_s Member

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    Acros is Greek. I think it means top or supreme or something along those lines.
     
  3. Poisson Du Jour

    Poisson Du Jour Member

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    Possibly an acronym for a proprietary process, always appearing in CAPITALS. Never cared to figure it out, though I do agree it sounds Greek to me...
     
  4. michael_r

    michael_r Subscriber

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    What is important is it differentiates that particular film from other Fuji B&W films in that it is a tabular-grained emulsion - Fuji's answer to Kodak TMax 100 and Ilford Delta 100. However as per my response in the other thread, Acros has two particular characteristics which are significantly different than its TMax and Delta counterparts: 1)It has virtually no reciprocity failure up to around two minutes of exposure, 2)It has much higher highlight contrast (in fact the steepest part of its characteristic curve is in the highlights).
     
  5. Mustafa Umut Sarac

    Mustafa Umut Sarac Member

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    The Acropolis (from the Greek acros, meaning high or upper and polis, meaning ''city) of Athens is a steep-sided hill supporting several temples, precincts, and other buildings. Archaeological evidence indicates it has been used since Neolithic times and that even then, as the numerous female figurines found there suggest, it was associated with female power. Although it had evidently used also as a defensible place of refuge since the Bronze Age, it appears nonetheless to have been a sacred site at all times.

    During the Classical period of the 5th century BCE in Athens, following the destructions of earlier temples by the Persians, the Greek general and statesman, Pericles (c. 500-429 BCE), initiated a vast rebuilding campagin for the Acropolis. The Propylaea (gateway) and the Parthenon were completed during his lifetime, but work on the Temple of Athena Nike and the Erechtheum was not begun until after his death.


    acropolis1.jpg


    A reconstruction of the Acropolis as it appeared in the 5th century BCE

    The Parthenon (447-438 BCE)

    The principal temple on the Acropolis is the Parthenon, designed by the architects Iktinus and Kallikrates. Completed in 438 BCE as a temple dedicated to Athena, the patron goddess of Athens, the Parthenon celebrates her in her aspect as a virgin goddess. Parthenos, Greek term for virgin and the root of the word parthenogenesis (virgin birth), was one of Athena's epithets.

    The extraordinary aesthetic impact of the Parthenon would appear to be enhanced by its so-called architectural refinements. These are slight adjustments in the design which seem to result in an improvement of the visual impression of the building as a whole. For example, lines that are perceived as horizontals in fact curve upward in the middle. The platform upon which the columns of the temple stand, for example, is slightly curved on all four sides, as if it were a small segment of a giant globe. The original rationale for this is not known for certain, but it may serve to correct the tendency of the human eye to perceive a long horizontal as curving downward in the middle. There may also be a more 'cosmic' reason for this design.

    Other refinements involve the columns: all columns are tilted inward slightly, and are placed closer together toward the corners of the building. This has the effect of creating a sense of stability and accentuates the corners, resulting in an almost imperceptible frame on each of the four sides. But again, it may be wrong to assume that it was for purely aesthetic reasons that such subtle refinements, which must have enourmously inflated the cost of the building, were undertaken.


    Erechtheum (421-405 BCE)
    The Erechtheum is on the northern side of the Acropolis, opposite the Parthenon. This complex Ionic building is built on an uneven site. The eastern room was dedicated to Athena in her aspect as patron of the city.

    The building was called the Erechtheum by Pausanias, but this was not its official name. There were two building phases. It is a strange shape, having 4 sets of columnar supports, 4 levels, and 3 structural units, each with own roof. The reason for complexity lies in the configuration of rock surface and the previous terracing in the area, and in the obvious necessity of building around the various cult spots which make this one of the most sacred places on the Acropolis.

    The area contained many signs and remains of Athens' mythical past (salt-water well, trident marks). The interior was thoroughly destroyed in later times and it is now very uncertain how it was originally organized. It once contained a much venerated image wooden statue of Athena Polias. The temple also housed various other Attic deities, including Erechtheus.
     
  6. Renato Tonelli

    Renato Tonelli Subscriber

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    Thank you - thoroughly enjoyed reading your post.
     
  7. billbretz

    billbretz Member

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    from wiktionary for acro:

    http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/acro-

    Etymology
    From Ancient Greek ἄκρος (akros, “highest, at the extremity”).

    Prefix
    acro-
    sharp
    tip
    extremity
    peak
     
  8. Mustafa Umut Sarac

    Mustafa Umut Sarac Member

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    If you make an Turkish etymological analysis in acro, its white *ak* , flow *ak* akro *akar o*/ it flows down
    It completes white mountain top and river flow.

    If you cant understand Turkish , you cant understand the roots of all languages on earth. It works successfully on any language.
     
  9. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    Of course there is also the possibility that the name was chosen at random merely because some one liked it. You are assuming that the marketing weasels at Fuji knew some greek. George Eastman named his cameras Kodak only because he liked the sound of the name.
     
  10. Mustafa Umut Sarac

    Mustafa Umut Sarac Member

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    odak means focus in Turkish , if you search brand names , they prefer Turkish sounding system. Russian is extremelly similar to Modern Turkey Turkish. German and English words , if you get a Irish , Scotch to English dictionary and if you understand Turkish , you start to laugh , its plain consonants removed Turkish.

    Kodak , kamera odak , camera focus , thats all simple
     
  11. voceumana

    voceumana Member

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    I read that George Eastman used Kodak because it sounded like the click of the shutter. Sometimes things that appear to have links are just random!
     
  12. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    Here is a George Eastman quote on the work Kodak. "Philologically, the word Kodak is as meaningless as a child’s first ’goo’—terse, abrupt to the point of rudeness, literally bitten off by firm and unyielding consonants at both ends, it snaps like a camera shutter in your face. What more would one ask!"

    As a plus it is easily pronounced in most languages increasing the company's visibility. As a child Eastman was said to play a game looking for palindromes, Kodak is close but not perfect.
     
  13. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    To Mustafa and all others who are interested in languages may I suggest the following very informative book, "The Loom of Language An Approach to the Mastery of Many Languages", Frederick Bodmer, W W Norton & Company, ISBN 0-393-30034-X (available in paperback). I found it very interesting and it explained to me the similarities in such geographically isolated languages as Latin, Irish, and Russian. These branches of the Indo-European family tree of languages all split off at the same time. For example the word for land is terra in Latin and tir in Irish. The word for mother is mater, maither, and materu in Latin, Irish, and Russian (genitive singular transliterated to the roman alphabet). Having studied all three languages this book confirmed my early suspicians.

    The book would be very useful for English speakers wishing to learn a germanic or romance language. English is a germanic language and the book gives as an example a line from The Lord's Prayer in german, dutch, danish, swedish, and icelandic. The danish is the closest to English, "Giv ons i Dag vort daglige Brod." Saying it out loud makes it easy to understand. Again this book is informative, interesting and a fun read (at least for me).
     
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  14. Trasselblad

    Trasselblad Member

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    Yeah, and mama and baba is Chinese for...guess? And the same in Korean and Japanese too...hmm. And if one were to actually hear a German, a Dane, a Swede, a Dutch and an Icelandic read that line loud, the perception of what comes closest to English may take some reconsidering (I have an oral understanding of all of those, sort of..)

    My point? I don't have one. Or perhaps, that even if languages have or had common roots, evolution did its job. Someone said that the language is the mirror of the culture of the people who speak it. Let's keep it like that.
     
  15. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    Trasselblad, I started learning german from my father as a small child. Some years ago I worked on a project for a large US company that had a number of swedish engineers. I found spoken swedish impossible to understand even single words. The written language was easier as the similarities were more apparent. Interestingly one of the engineers was quite shocked when I mentioned that English was a germanic language. He had never looked at things that way before.

    As for linquistic evolution people tend to be very conservative and the most used words in a language tend not to change. Somewhere in Loom there is a paragraph witten in perfectly correct angle-saxon that is word for word the same as one would say today. This conservatism allows English speakers to read Chaucer (died 1400) with only a little help. Icelanders seem to hold the record in this as the language of the Sagas is essentially unchanged from the icelandic of today.

    One has to be somewhat carful with examples like mama and baba. The russian word dada means uncle not father. :smile:
     
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  16. eddie

    eddie Subscriber

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    That's my story, and I'm stickin' to it!
     
  17. Newt_on_Swings

    Newt_on_Swings Member

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    The other big question is what the correct pronunciation of acros is. Ah-cross, ack-Ross, across? Lol
     
  18. RattyMouse

    RattyMouse Subscriber

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    Outstanding!!
     
  19. Poisson Du Jour

    Poisson Du Jour Member

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    Done and dusted! Love it. That shall be the meaning of ACROS. :smile:
    More importantly, go out and use it. The more we use, maybe the less chance Fuji will put ACROS, and others, on the chopping block. :pouty:
     
  20. Mainecoonmaniac

    Mainecoonmaniac Subscriber

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    The name suits the film. Great for long exposures. One fault. The 120 base too thin for my Super Ikonta IV. Make the frames overlap. But it's my fault. :sad:
     
  21. lxdude

    lxdude Member

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    I say ak-roce.
     
  22. Leigh B

    Leigh B Member

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    Mama, dada, and similar are nonsense words that should not be considered part of any language.

    They're our renditions of the first sounds that babies make, and babies have no idea what sounds mean.

    The most persistent and universal words across languages and time are the names of body parts.

    - Leigh
     
  23. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    Mama & papa are perfectly valid English words check the Oxford English dictionary and the russian word for uncle is Дядя (dya-dya) :smile:
     
  24. Trasselblad

    Trasselblad Member

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    Gerry, are you sure those Swedes were...ahem, really Swedish? Kära mamma och pappa...in that case. A Swedish engineer who doesn't know his linguistic roots? Sounds like someone took you for a ride...

    :smile: Eddie got it right.

    BTW: I learnt Swedish at a very tender age. Never bothered to try to master or learn any other language.
     
  25. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    Trasselblad,

    Yes they were swedish and great people to work with. One of the things that I had to do with the product was to change the pulldown menus from English to the swedish equivalents provided to me.