Adding effects during print process

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by JBoontje, Oct 4, 2009.

  1. JBoontje

    JBoontje Member

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    A very long while ago, I read something about people that use certain fluids to achieve certain effects in their prints. One example was to add coffee to one of the baths (developer/fixer/stop bath? probably not the developer) to get this Sepia toned print.

    I was wondering if you every heard of this, if so, what do you add to a bath to get this special effect?
     
  2. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    Weak tea was often used, coffee would need to be extremely weak - you do it after fixing and washing. It needs care to make sure it's not uneven.

    This way you can imitate the ivory cloured base of older discontinued papers. Works best with a warmtoned or slightly sepai toned image.

    Ian
     
  3. Mike1234

    Mike1234 Inactive

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    Careful, guys... too much manipulation and you'll be tempted to the dark side of (*gasp*) digital.
     
  4. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    Been there for many years :D Just prefer the right side :smile:

    Ian
     
  5. Mike1234

    Mike1234 Inactive

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    Shhh.... must keep that kind of talk to a whisper... there are analog ears here.
     
  6. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    Another method is to flash your print while in the developer to get the Sabattier effect. This can be quite spectacular, especially in color. There are at least 3 text books on this subject, one published by EK.

    PE
     
  7. JBoontje

    JBoontje Member

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    Interesting, I've never heard of this before :smile:
     
  8. Existing Light

    Existing Light Member

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    By any chance, do you know the name of the book published by EK? This sounds pretty cool. I might want to give it a try some time :smile:
     
  9. winger

    winger Subscriber

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    You can also use a small LED flashlight around the outer edges of the print while it's in the developer.
     

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  10. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    It is "Creative Darkroom Techniques".

    Here is an example of cross processing and Sabattier effect combined.

    The left picture is the print from cross processed EPP and the right picture is a print that has been flashed in the color developer.

    PE
     

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  11. jglass

    jglass Subscriber

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    That is very cool. I've never seen the effect on color paper. Is that 1/10 second or something in that vicinity?
     
  12. Shaggysk8

    Shaggysk8 Member

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    How about using sand over the image when enlarging I have seen some cool effects doing that, none to hand thou!
     
  13. Existing Light

    Existing Light Member

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    Thanks. I'll check that out when I get a chance
     
  14. JBoontje

    JBoontje Member

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    Sand.. that sounds like a good one. Probably the most messy one too, have to try it out some time.
     
  15. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    i wouldn't introduce tea or coffee into your fixer bath --- why ruin your fixer ?
    instead i would have a bath after the first wash
    where the print could be soaked in tea or coffee ..
    it is the tannins that stain the paper,
    you can also get tannins by boiling tree nuts ( acorns )
    and bark and other "stuff" that may or may not work better.

    if enlarge through a bath of water, you are able to get interesting effects as well ...

    have fun!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 5, 2009
  16. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    The time at which you flash, and the length of time depends on both the original exposure on easel and on the development time. I used 2' at 68 deg F for the ones shown, and the flash was about 1 second at 1.5 minutes. It took about 5 tries to get the right effect.

    PE
     
  17. vet173

    vet173 Member

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    Sand in the darkroom??????? You'll be wishing for only dust in no time.
     
  18. Nikanon

    Nikanon Member

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    im going to have to say the the worst would probably be glass dust and shards
     
  19. jfish

    jfish Member

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    split toning, with 2 or more different toning chemicals, putting prints in toners, or parts of toners (i.e. bleach) then another toner that you wouldn't normally use a bleach for, etc. look at the toning galleries at alexisneel.com for some of the examples.
     
  20. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    mica / isinglass dust is no fun ...