Adhesive for sheet cork? (tripod head)

Discussion in 'Camera Building, Repairs & Modification' started by David Brown, May 11, 2013.

  1. David Brown

    David Brown Subscriber

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    I need to replace the padding on a tripod head. I have some 1/16" thick sheet cork that would be suitable, but looking for recommendations on a good adhesive for the cork to metal. OR, there is similar material available at the "home center" with "self adhesive" (used for cabinet liners, etc.). Any suggestions?
     
  2. E. von Hoegh

    E. von Hoegh Member

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    Pliobond brand contact cement. Clean the metal surface with steelwool.
     
  3. paul_c5x4

    paul_c5x4 Subscriber

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    Just about any contact adhesive will do the job - Another alternative is double sided sticky tape as used for carpets.
     
  4. erikg

    erikg Member

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    3m super 77.
     
  5. agnosticnikon

    agnosticnikon Member

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    I would imagine that contact cement would work fine. Usually available in tube or small cans. Coat both surfaces, let dry till tacky, then CAREFULLY put them together. I say carefully, because once they make contact, they're stuck! Just a little pressure and it's a permanent bond. Make sure not to get it on your screw threads or other surfaces and you should be fine. I'm probably making it sound harder than it is, but a little care is involved in using most glues.
    Hope this helps.
     
  6. AgX

    AgX Member

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    Adhesive tape, solvent-based household cement, rubber cement (contact cement), epoxy cement. All would work.

    I find contact cement most appropriate for the intended use: it's easy to apply, stays flexible and even allows taking the cork off again.
     
  7. Dave Swinnard

    Dave Swinnard Subscriber

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    +1 for the Pliobond. I found mine at a model railroad hobbyist store.
     
  8. Ed Bray

    Ed Bray Member

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    A pity you're in the USA or I would have sent you a self adhesive cork floor tile. As stated any contact cement would work Evo-stick or Bostick are the sort of trade names in the UK.
     
  9. Born2Late

    Born2Late Subscriber

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    Ditto on the carpet tape. Fast, easy and secure.
     
  10. David Brown

    David Brown Subscriber

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    I sort of figured that contact cement would be a consensus, and I am familiar with the material and how to use it. I was hoping something more "workable" would show up. I am going to try the self-adhesive stuff, and if it fails, I'll use contact cement.

    I'm replacing the pad on one of these Manfrotto plates, so fitting is tricky and getting it a little wonky with the contact cement is a possibility. :blink:

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/554165-REG/Manfrotto_410PL_410PL_Quick_Release_Plate.html

    Thanks, y'all! :smile:
     
  11. Worker 11811

    Worker 11811 Member

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    I use 3M "Fastbond" contact adhesive.
    It's used for countertops and things. I used it to stick a piece of vinyl flooring material down to the Masonite benchtop in my darkroom.

    I still have about a half a quart left over. I use it for just about everything. (Everything that needs to be glued down. :wink: )

    I used it to replace the cork pad on my Tilt-All tripod. Worked like a charm.
     
  12. Greg Davis

    Greg Davis Subscriber

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    Michael's craft stores sell self adhesive cork sheets in the proper thickness. I bought a sheet and made a bunch of replacement pads for my university's Manfrotto plates from a template I hade created.
     
  13. greybeard

    greybeard Member

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    A standard technique for positioning countertop laminate ("Formica") is to put contact cement on both surfaces, let dry completely, and then place a sheet of kraft wrapping paper on the base. Ideally, the paper will cover all but a fraction of an inch at the most critical edge or corner. The laminate is placed on top, and positioned carefully. (The small amount of adhesive that bonds is weak enough to be error correction.) Then the kraft paper is pulled out, and the bond made progressively from one side to the other to prevent bubbles.

    It think that for something as small as a tripod top, I would use waxed paper or even silicone release paper to do essentially the same thing.
     
  14. jeffreyg

    jeffreyg Subscriber

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    Consider adhesive backed nonslip vinyl for use in showers and bathtubs. I resurfaced the platform of a Tiltall tripod a number of years ago and it is still holding up very well. It was easy to cut to the exact shape and install.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/
     
  15. Worker 11811

    Worker 11811 Member

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    I just cut a square of cork a little but bigger than the plate, glued it down with contact adhesive then trimmed it flush with a razor blade. An Exacto knife blade cuts the center hole quite nicely.
     
  16. David Brown

    David Brown Subscriber

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    Actually, the technique I was taught for countertops (Dad was in the trades) was narrow strips of wood or scrap from the Formica. Using that model, I think flat toothpicks might be the way to go for such a small job. :tongue: (Release paper actually sounds like a good idea!)

    I am now in possession of both unadhesived cork (and glue) and the self-adhesive kind. I am going to experiment and will get back to this thread with the results.