ADOX Films

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Paul Jenkin, Mar 10, 2009.

  1. Paul Jenkin

    Paul Jenkin Member

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    A very kind friend of mine has just given me three rolls of ADOX film to try out - CHS25, CHS50 and CHS100.

    I've recently purchased a changing back and Paterson tank to develop the films but I'd appreciate an expert view on which chemicals I should use as developer, stop-bath and fixer. I can get hold of most Ilford chemicals quite readily; is any combination particularly suitable?

    Are these films in any way 'difficult' to process to obtain optimum results? Is it worth taking them to a pro-lab for my first outing?

    I'd be grateful for some advice.

    Thanks in advance. Paul.
     
  2. Alessandro Serrao

    Alessandro Serrao Member

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    They should be made by efke.
    Watch for the anti-halation layer (it must be eliminated by a pre-dev wash step) and watch for the gelatin anti-halation support during drying.
    It can be ruined quite easily.
     
  3. ntenny

    ntenny Member

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    I wouldn't say "must". I've never prewashed the Efke/ADOX films and I've never found that to be a problem; the dye just comes out with the first bath.

    I process them pretty much as any other film: put on the spool, developer, water stop, fixer, rinse. The emulsion is quite soft and scratching problems are more common with these films than others---handle carefully, especially since the base tends to be curly and squirm away from you when you least expect it.

    Neat films. I really like the response of the 25 speed one to skin tones---it makes for portraits with an indefinably "old" look (about the picture, not the subject).

    -NT
     
  4. Mark Antony

    Mark Antony Member

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    I use these films often and I have never used a 'pre rinse' to remove AH layers. The film is made by in Zagreb by fotokemika (used to be EFKE) the film needs to be handled with care compared to Kodak/Ilford/Fuji especially the 120 which can curl.
    Great films with nice tonality, I like them in Rodinal, this is CHS 25 on 35mm:
    [​IMG]
    Here are some tests:
    Adox CHS 25 Art
    Adox CHS 50 Art
    Adox CHS 100 Art

    Good films well worth a try.
    Have fun
    Mark Antony
     
  5. Shangheye

    Shangheye Member

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    I just posted a CHS 50 image tonight http://www.apug.org/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=42117&limit=1 . I presoak for one minute and develop in Rodinal 1:50. I use water for stop bath, which is what is recommened on the website I believe, and fix in Ilford Rapid Fixer. I have found it's tonal properties to be exceptional, but it does need handling with care when loading the reels, drying etc. I am a complete fan. K
     
  6. srs5694

    srs5694 Member

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    The films should process fine in most general-purpose developers, such as Ilford ID-11/Kodak D-76, Ilford Ilfotec HC, Kodak HC110, etc. Note that these films are fairly coarse-grained for their speeds. This isn't a problem for the ISO 25 film, which is rather fine-grained because it's so slow. The ISO 50 film is, in my subjective judgment, about as grainy as most ISO 100-200 films (although there are very few true ISO 200 B&W films for comparison), and the ISO 100 film approaches most ISO 400 films in graininess. For this reason, you might want to avoid developers like Rodinal that tend to emphasize film grain, particularly for the ISO 100 film if it's in 35mm, unless you want a rather grainy look to the film. If you've got the film in MF or larger, though, this shouldn't be as much of a factor.
     
  7. Louis Nargi

    Louis Nargi Member

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    I'v been trying these films to thanks
     
  8. bwakel

    bwakel Subscriber

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    I've only used CHS25 and haven't needed to pre-soak it. It devs very nicely in Tetenal Neofin Blue to give great contrast and tonality. However, the film is very curly and very easily scratched so I've gone over to the simplicity of Delta 100 which gives more consitent and manageable results.
     
  9. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    Hello,

    They are nice films. They are delicate, though, and most, including myself, seem to think that the recommended developing times are on the short end. I remember reading a data sheet at one point that suggested against using a stop bath above a certain concentration (1%???), or just using water as your second chemical. It also recommend the use of a hardening fixer, and processing at 20 C, not 24 C. I take the extra precaution of minimizing the "wet time" as much as possible. I aim for short development times, and do not do my normal wash procedure, which is similar to the Ilford procedure, involving agitation in the tank. I tried them all, and settled on the 25, as it is the most unique one of the three, IMO. Two other great aspects are that they are relatively inexpensive and come in every size under the sun. I was able to get 12x20 right out of the back at Freestyle without special ordering or anything.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 11, 2009
  10. Wishy

    Wishy Member

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    Efke 25 developed in R09 is wonderful for brutalist architecture. If you have enough light its definately worth trying!

    Also, i don't do anything different with the film and it seems to come out fine
     
  11. Ektagraphic

    Ektagraphic Member

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    I do not know much about processing them, but I can tell you that they are alla great films! They give a great antique 60 year old look.
     
  12. jelke

    jelke Member

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    i like to try adox 50 (4x5) sheetfilm.., is this film as curly as the 120 rollfilm?
     
  13. Shangheye

    Shangheye Member

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    It does curl a little, but so do other films, it really is not bad at all. Personally, I think it is wonderful in 4x5 and it is my preffered film for portraits at 4x5 (the slight orthopanchromatic nature of the film brings out wonderful tones). I am not sure CHS 50 would be good for landscapes, because of washed out skies, though if you use a polariser, I have found it works for me. I have heard that putting a red filter in front will wash out your skies.....

    K