Adox MCC 110

Discussion in 'Enlarging' started by michael_r, Jan 19, 2011.

  1. michael_r

    michael_r Subscriber

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    I'm looking forward to trying this paper given the reviews it is getting from Sexton and others. However does anyone have experience with selenium toning?

    I favour neutral to slightly cold tones. Currently I use Oriental VCFB, and a 3-4 minute toning in KRST at 1+19 yields a slightly cold tone with some intensification, which is what I'm after. If left in the bath longer, or with higher concentrations the paper quickly shifts color substantially, so it requires care.

    So what I'm wondering is if I can get the same results with MCC 110 in KRST. My understanding is that even though it has a pure bright white base, the natural tonality of MCC 110 is on the warm side of neutral. So I'm hoping whatever warm-ish or greenish tone it has can be neutralized in KRST (with some intensification) without a substantial color shift to cold browns (?) or purple.

    My favourite was Kodak Polymax Fine Art lightly toned in selenium but since it was discontinued, so far Oriental has been the only neutral-cold paper that looks similar to me.
     
  2. mhanc

    mhanc Member

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    My experience with MCC 110 developed in Dektol 1:2 is that it is indeed ever so slightly on the warm side of neutral. But one would have to be looking for it to notice. In terms of Se toning, I have only used KRST with a 1:19 dilution. When toned for 3-5 minutes there was some slight intensification but nothing dramatic. Longer times - up to 25 minutes - did not produce any color shift or further intensification.

    Thanks for sharing your Se toning results with the Oriental VCFB. I have just tried this paper and am very impressed with it.
     
  3. brian steinberger

    brian steinberger Member

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    My experiences with MC110 is that it does not go "cold" or certainly not towards blue at all, rather it simply cools off, much like MGIV. I also think Orientals base is whiter than MC110. I use Oriental and tone just as you state above and love the results. It's the perfect neutral/cool combo for my printing. I would recommend sticking with Oriental.
     
  4. michael_r

    michael_r Subscriber

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    Thanks for the feedback. It's true I like what I get with Oriental so I'm not sure why I'd switch, other than curiosity.

    What time and dilution do you currently use? Same as what I'm doing? I'm wondering because I was thinking about running some tests with it more dilute than my current 1+19. My only concern with my current method is the toning time is rather short (usually 3 minutes). So I'm not sure if that is suffient time for the Selenium to have an archival impact. I was thinking of maybe trying 1+30 or 1+40 in order to get a longer toning time, but I know toning is not as simple as "half the dilution, double the time. It might be that at 1+40 I get no cooling or enhanced d-max no matter how long the paper is in the bath. So I just wanted to get your take on it since we seem to be after the same type of subtle yet noticeable effect.
     
  5. brian steinberger

    brian steinberger Member

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    Michael, a shift in color is indicating archival impact. Lower dilution and less time or higher dilution and more time, it doesn't matter. I used to tone Oriental at 1:9 for 2 minutes and was impressed. But then I wanted a little more leeway in time and went to the 1:19 dilution and use it 3-4 minutes depending on the image. I haven't tried higher dilutions (1:30, 1:40). Some main reasons for using a higher dilution would be for some archival toning with a small shift in color, such as on warmtone papers. But with Oriental the color shift is very pleasant and almost "charcoally", I love it. I find the 1:19 the perfect dilution for Selenium toning. I used to keep two dilutions in my darkroom, 1:19 and 1:9, but use 1:19 everything now. Hope this helps.
     
  6. mistercody

    mistercody Member

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    I am currently using Adox MCC 110 and I love it. I've toned some prints in KRST 1:9 for around 2 minutes or so, and I get some bluish/purplish shifts in the shadows which I like. It isn't drastic with the times I've toned for, but it does take away the olive tone to my eyes. The cooled off tone is not extreme even with the dilution I used, so don't think it will turn them crazy blue or anything. Also, I am developing in Dektol.

    I am glad I went to look at my prints, I noticed one was dented. Got to reprint.