AE-1

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by Anayari, Dec 1, 2011.

  1. Anayari

    Anayari Member

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    Hi again! Sorry to ask so many questions but I am thirsty for some advice. Like I said in my previous post I just got a Canon AE-1 on the evilbay after admiring many users pictures on Flickr. What I know about photography has been self taught through practice and reading on forums and books. I only shot with point and shoot 35mm cams before aquiring my dslr many years ago and so I am now trying to teach myself to use a film slr with this camera. I was lucky to get the manual with it and have studied it before loading some film and taking pics but I feel like I am starting all over learning a new format and the metter puzzles me ^^; I'm not sure if I'm using it right I guess my first film qill tell me just how bad I've messed up. Anyhoo the AE-1 came with these lenses and I was wondering what your thoughts are about them and if I should sell them and buy some canon lenses instead (other than the nifty fifty 1.8 the rest are third party)

    I got a Tokina 35-105mm 1:3.5-4.3 (I've searched a bit for this lens and I'm not sure if it has a macro??? cna anyone tell me about this one pls?)

    Asanuma 135mm 1:2.8

    and Asanuma 80-200mm 1:4.0

    Any info about this lenses and directions as to where to start reading up/ do for a newbie will be eternally gratefull :smile:
     
  2. zsas

    zsas Member

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    Welcome back to film! What you didn't say is what you intend to photograph (family, friends, architecture, street, night-street, portrait, nature, sports, birds, etc)? Lenses compliment your style/interest and keeping those lenses or getting different glass all depend on your interest/style etc. Personally I have 2 cameras both have the same lens (a 50mm) and that is all I need for now. I couldnt imagine a 135 or other focal length, but for you this might be too restrictive. See what I mean?
     
  3. zsas

    zsas Member

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    Oh and Black and White Photography: A Basic Manual, Henry Horenstein is a great read!
     
  4. Anayari

    Anayari Member

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    Righ I totally get u :smile: I used to be on flickr be jsut deleted my account because I wanted to start over of sorts. I mostlyyyy like shooting dolls, toys and miniatures and portraits. My set up for my dslr canon is 50mm 1.4, 100mm 2.8 i think macro and I used to have an 85mm but sold it because I ostly used the 50mm rendering that one sort of useless for me. I seem to be keen to my primes and not zooms but i wouldn't count a zoom out either.
     
  5. Anayari

    Anayari Member

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    Oh oh and I would lvoe to be able to do my own processing but from what I've seen of that I'm extremely intimidated because I don't knwo if there is an alternate way of making prints other than buying an enlarger and those seem big and expensive but maybe I'm just clueless still? Is there any way to make a darkroom in my say bathroom and make prints still???? sory for the bombarding in questions!
     
  6. dances_w_clouds

    dances_w_clouds Subscriber

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    The best "bang for your bucks" are the Canon FD lenses. They are the only ones I use on my A model Canon bodies. I have a few zooms by Tamron but that is it. Happy shooting and welcome to APUG
     
  7. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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  8. guitstik

    guitstik Member

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    Whoa, slow down and take a breath. Your Canon is going to be just like your Dslr except that you have to put film in it and you won't be able to see what you have shot until it gets processed. To start, did you just shoot your Dslr on auto/program or do you know how the meter/shutter/aperture work? If you know how those three things work together you are golden but if not then you will have to learn. I would start by going to Walgreen or CVS and buying their cheep in house film and also have them process it. I do that whenever I get a new/old camera just to test the shutter speeds and check for light leaks. The inexpensive film will allow you to get familiar with your equipment and practice for about a $1/roll. When you feel comfortable with all of the controls on your camera then you can pick a good film for getting really good. The lenses you have should do well enough for you at this time and as you progress and start finding your own voice with the camera then step up to better glass. My advice on lenses is to stick with the 50 until you become more proficient and then start experimenting.

    Welcome to APUG.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 1, 2011
  9. Pumalite

    Pumalite Subscriber

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    Welcome to Apug. Keep the lenses you have. See what kind of pictures you can take. Later slowly buy lenses accoding to your needs. FD lenses are cheap now a days.
     
  10. hvandam2

    hvandam2 Member

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    Welcome!

    I've used the Canon AE-1 since 1980. A very nice camera. The FD lenses are a great buy now and are very sharp. You can't go wrong with them; I have not seen any of the lenses you mention. If you want macro, look for the canon FD 80-200 zoom, it has a macro setting on it and there seem to be a lot of them for sale. The 135 mm focal length appears to be used for portraits, I have a 135mm fix length FD lens and that is what it was advertised as.

    You can do your own film developing easily, I do not have a darkroom, but purchased a changing tent that makes it easy to load the film in the development tank. I use a small washtub to bring my chemicals to the right temperature. For developing, I started with Ilford film and chemistry, mainly because it was easier to get than the Kodak products. Here is an excellent intro to developing your own film http://www.ilfordphoto.com/Webfiles/200629163442455.pdf. Also Check out another contributor to APUG, Jason Brunner. His free videos on youtube have really been valuable, aside from hilarious! http://www.youtube.com/user/alternativecamera?blend=12&ob=5#p/u/8/6P9bNcBE_Hc, his web site is http://www.jasonbrunner.com/ where you can find his DVD on developing.

    The Harry Horenstein book mentioned in one of the replies is the best intro to Black and White photography I have found.

    The only thing to beware of is a peculiar problem called G.A.S... Gadget Acquisition Syndrome, You start with one format and one camera and then you JUST HAVE TO TRY 1. a rangefinder 2. medium format 3. large format ....So , you may get G.A.S. at some point in the future :laugh:

    There are many great folks here on APUG who are generous with their knowledge. They have helped me a lot.

    Have Fun!
     
  11. Jeff Kubach

    Jeff Kubach Member

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    Welcome to APUG. I like the AE-1, but it is battery depended.

    Jeff
     
  12. ntenny

    ntenny Member

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    About the lenses: Canon's own lenses in the FD mount are generally good and extremely cheap, but there is some very good third-party glass out there as well. Asanuma seems to have been sort of like Vivitar, a reseller of lenses sourced from various manufacturers---I can't find anything about the specific lenses you have, but I suppose the thing to do is try them out and see what you get.

    But given that you're just getting to grips with the camera itself, if I were you I'd leave the 50/1.8 parked on it for now, while you're getting comfortable. It's an excellent lens in its own right.

    -NT
     
  13. Anayari

    Anayari Member

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    Wow I'm floored by the generousity of this forum thank you SO MUCH for everyone that replied :smile: I am loving it here and will keep reading up as I did when I was getting a grip on my dslr. I really appreciate all the advice you've provided. I am very used to shooting with 50mm lenses I had the 1.4 for my canon dslr and currently own the 1.8 for my nikon d90 which is what I mainly use now. I pushed myself to learn to use my dslr in manual since I bought it and the only thing I rely automatically on sometimes is focus but I prefer to focus manually too. I never took a photography class in my life and I had to figure out the exposure, aperture, ect on my own but in the srl it is mindboogling for me ^^; I am trying out different combos but I can't be sure if I'm doign the right thing until I get that first roll developed. I might just bring my dslr out with me and use the settings from that to compose my analog shots just to get comfortable with the new camera. I will try to find some cheap film around here I've only found film at walgreens so far (I live in puerto rico) but I will keep searching :smile: I will also stick with the 50mm for now...and guess what I'm already looking at other 35mm bodies its insane I can't help myself I keep seeing ones I love on the outside and also love the images they produce WHY DID I TAKE A LOOK AT ALL THOSE LEICAS??? And can someone tell me why they are so expensive? the images I've seen from the rangefinders are so pretty but the price scared me especially for their lens I need to do my research there still I feel so overwhelemed XD In the meantime I will keep reading and bugging you guys with questions XD thanks again so much!
     
  14. ntenny

    ntenny Member

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    How bad are shipping costs from the mainland? Your best bet for film may be mail-order from one of the usual suspects (e.g., B&H or Adorama).

    Leica prices have a lot to do with the collectible market. If you want to see the other end of the market, look at the used prices for Canon EOS film bodies! (I paid US$6 for mine; see if you can beat that...)

    -NT
     
  15. John Koehrer

    John Koehrer Subscriber

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    If your Dslr was a 2/3 sensor, the 50 on film will be a slightly wider viewing angle.
    On the dxxxl it was about 75-80m equivalent.

    PM me your address and I'll mail you a good book. Keep it for reference or pass it on when you've gotten what you want out of it.
     
  16. AgX

    AgX Member

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  17. Anayari

    Anayari Member

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    thanks to all of you again so much :smile: John I've pmd you and AgX going there right now! thanks!