Aerographic film speeds

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by mikepry, Apr 9, 2005.

  1. mikepry

    mikepry Subscriber

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    Does anyone know the formula for converting an aerographic ISO to pictorial ISO? I have bought a roll of that Plus x from Ed on ebay and it is labeled ISO 125. It doesn't give a aerographic designation but the Kodak website lists the 2402 film as ISO A 200. If there isn't a designation on the label would I be safe to assume it is equivalent 125 pictorial?

    I have an older roll as well that a friend gave me and it has the designation EAFS 200. I need to know the pictorial speed so I can begin testing it. By the way, Mr.Foto was great to deal with.
     
  2. John Bartley

    John Bartley Member

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    Mike,

    I don't know the answer - sorry. I do have a question. Do you have a plan for cutting it without scratching it? I've looked at buying one of these rolls, and the only things about them that have caused me to hold off are the thinness and the problem of cutting them accurately.

    cheers
     
  3. jimgalli

    jimgalli Subscriber

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    Mike, I shoot it at 125. What can trip you up though is red filters. This aerial film doesn't act like normal film with a red filter as it's extra red sensitive. Kodak says a #25 only costs 2/3 stop.

    John, Here's a link to a thread I wrote one time about cutting this stuff. It naturally curls into the emulsion so although it is a little harder to load than regular thick sheets, the natural curl holds it firmly and flatly at the back of the film holders.
     
  4. fschifano

    fschifano Member

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    I've seen these ads on Ebay too and was initially attracted to the stuff. Who could resist making sheet film out of this stuff so inexpensively. Cutting it down wouldn't be a problem with a paper cutter. But what got me thinking was the thickness of the support. It's only half as thick and that could be a problem with your plane of sharp focus and the material's fit in your film holders. Finding a good EI for the film shouldn't be a problem. Start at the box speed and expose a few sheets +/- 1 1/2 stops in half stop intervals. Keep notes. Let us know how it turns out.
     
  5. John Bartley

    John Bartley Member

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    Thank you Jim, Great article !!

    Now that I have an 8x10 on the way from eBay, I guess I'll give it a try :smile:

    cheers eh?
     
  6. Murray@uptowngallery

    Murray@uptowngallery Member

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    Kodak Aerial group told me rough rule of thumb for conversion from ISO A (aerial) to ISO (terrestrial) is to multiply by 2.5, so ISO A of 200 becomes ISO 500.

    However, the people I sent some lengths to test before I had a camera capable of using it told me they exposed at ISO 80.

    Then if you look at the data sheet, they get a very wide range of film speeds depending upon developer chemistry, number of tanks, temperature and process speed (5-25 feet per minute, 99 degrees F for example).

    We would be likely to use nothing remotely related to the original chems or process methods.
     
  7. John Bartley

    John Bartley Member

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    I'm new to 8x10 in particular and LF in general, but here's what I've found so far::

    1) The film is very easy to cut and loads quite nicely and stays quite flat in the holders
    2) I did my first couple of negatives at iso125 and found them soooo thin that expozure times were in the order of 1-2 seconds on AZO gr3 and they were very lacking in contrast
    3) I exposed a couple more at 2 stops over and found them better - did NOT change development from normal
    4) did the next couple at 4 stops over, developed normally and now have negatives with full detail and exposure times on gr3 azo in the the area of 1 minute.
    5) My last four negs are 3-4 stops overexposed and are developed slightly "harder" than normal and don't look a whole lot different than the ones developed "normally".

    The caveat : I am a complete newbie and am still experimenting, so try this with that caution in mind and be prepared to ruin a few negatives.

    cheers
     
  8. Murray@uptowngallery

    Murray@uptowngallery Member

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    2-4 stops over ISO 125 makes the film sound s-l-o-w...

    Maybe I have directional dyslexia...the why tested ISOA (aerial) 200 film (2402) at 80 may have simply ignored my info because I went the wrong way...200/2.5 IS exactly 80. I do this with metering shadows and trying to overexpose them instead of under...can't seem to stop making that error.

    Murray
     
  9. jimgalli

    jimgalli Subscriber

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    Ahhh. Ignorance is bliss. The can said 125 so I rate the stuff at 125 and have always gotten excellent exposures. Murray, I'll look for a neg to scan and post for you. Out in the piles.
     
  10. mikepry

    mikepry Subscriber

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    Actually the film I bought from this fella on ebay was surplus from a custom made order. It was an emulsion made specifically for a customer to their specifications. I bought the 9 1/2" wide and not the 5" wide.

    After doing some testing (BTZS) I finally came to the proper speed and it is 40. It is slow, but I've had nice results.

    The weak point is a low contrast scene when using Platinum. Otherwise it's nice. If anyone would like the cuves from winplotter I'd be happy to email them.
     
  11. Murray@uptowngallery

    Murray@uptowngallery Member

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    Thanks, Jim.

    Mike, that's interesting you have a traditional '125' rating...isn't that the 'real' terrestrial speed for 'normal' tri-X?

    My 5" 2402 is apparently not a Kodak stock item, made to order for customers.

    The datasheet for 2402 is interesting insofar as the intended processing is a whole different world. Special hot (99 F) chemistry, speedy tanks, ISO dependent upon chemistry and feet per minute and number of tanks. This is probably all true for other film subjected to all those variables, but the wide range of results on the datasheet was an eye opener.

    Local lab told me their wasn't much point in running the pre-exposed test strips because they had nearly nothing to do with how I would use it. I have no dark room, if it's not apparent. Cutting this film in the dark has been a little traumatic too. Hopefully humorous...

    Having only worked with 35mm & 120 in school, I stuck the 5"x10" or so spool in it's cannister cap to keep it from rolling as I rolled some film off. I pulled too hard & it hopped off the lid and began rolling across the bathroom floor, as I franticly rolled and rolled to keep it from touching the floor. When I caught up with the roll I saw oblique light coming under the door, so I grabbed a towel & stuffed it under the door...no fogging, luckily.

    Then I built a double bracket & shaft (long partially threaded bolt & nut) to hold the reel, but I couldn't seem to get the bolt through the bracket in the dark with the weight of the spool on it. The spark of the tape coming off the film was not expected either, but no harm done.

    Hopefully my next adventure with the big spool will be uneventful. Local lab offered to let me come in & use their night vision IR goggles.