Agfa Portriga

Discussion in 'Enlarging' started by Will S, Dec 11, 2006.

  1. Will S

    Will S Member

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    I found two boxes of 16x20 Agfa Portriga in a photo store here in Madison for $35 each. Is this a good deal? I seem to recall this being a good portrait paper.

    Thanks,

    Will
     
  2. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    Will;

    I understand it to have been a fine paper. I have an emulsion formula that is purported to be for Portriga in a folder here somewhere. I intend to give it a try someday.

    PE
     
  3. Bob Carnie

    Bob Carnie Subscriber

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    Will
    Agfa Portriga is one of the classic great papers.
    I would think it is greyed out though , but worth the chance if you can get your money back if it is nfg.
     
  4. elekm

    elekm Member

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    That sounds like a good deal, as long as it's still good. Heck, if that were me, I'd probably buy it.
     
  5. Ole

    Ole Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    When I emptied out the bix box of everything that has been following my darkroom gear since the 80's, I found that all the Agfa and Kodak papers were dead. The Agfa was fogged, and the Kodak was no longer sensitive to light!

    But Ilford, Kentmere and Oriental were still fine.
     
  6. Paul Howell

    Paul Howell Member

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    I think Agfa stopped producing Portirga in the mid to late 80s. I have few sheets of 11X14, some fog, I print dark and then bleach. I think $35 is really very high.
     
  7. Bjorn R

    Bjorn R Member

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    I bought some Portriga I while ago (http://www.apug.org/forums/showthread.php?t=32983) and have so far not have any problems with fogging or anything. What I really like about the paper is the texture and the tonality which makes this my number one choice when it comes to portraits. I would probably by one box, take it home and do some tests and if they are OK buy the other.

    Does anyone know of an available paper that has the same texture?
     
  8. Petzi

    Petzi Member

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    Is it Portriga, or is it Portriga Rapid?
     
  9. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    In Europe Portriga was better known as Record rapid, which had a glossy base, and Portriga with a stippled matt base.

    Portriga Rapid was the RC version and came with a glossy or matt base.

    Ian
     
  10. Monophoto

    Monophoto Member

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    I have a box of Portriga that I picked up at a flea market many years ago. It is slightly fogged, but still useable for most subjects.

    16x20 boxes are probably 10 sheets each - so you would be paying $3.50 per sheet. I would be inclined to buy one box, dash home to test it to see how fogged it is, and if its still useable, then buy the second box.
     
  11. Steve Sherman

    Steve Sherman Subscriber

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    The last of the good Portriga was manufactured in the late 80's. The emulsion was changed by removing the Cadmium so as to be more environmentally friendly. This effectively destroyed the best properties of Portriga Rapid.

    Because it is a Chloro-Bromide emulsion it does keep somewhat better than pure Bromide emulsions.

    It really depends on the packaging, I have a nice supply of early 80’s Portriga which I have kept refrigerated without any ill effects.

    If the Grade label is dark blue, or even light blue with no red markings in the label and it is not fogged it is worth its weight in gold.
     
  12. climbabout

    climbabout Member

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    portriga

    I second Steve's comments - I have a supply of the old portriga from the same batch Steve speaks of - I've kept it frozen - leaving 1 package in the darkroom from which I currently work from - it's a wonderful paper, unequalled in my opinion, by anything manufactured today - assuming you like the warm tones that it's known for.
    Tim Jones
     
  13. Mark Layne

    Mark Layne Member

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    The only paper I have here which is fogged is some Polyfiber. Also a box of Insignia(Record Rapid) which makes great pseudo-platinum prints.
    I have Elite, Galerie. Portriga and Varilour which are just fine, and some G4 Brovira which came up in the hold of a ship in 1975, it is still G4 and clean.

    Oh yes the famous Pal Print and Pal Brom. The Print is fogged the Bromide fine.

    If you dabble in development, CuSO4 bleach and redevelopment as per Tim Rudman's books, fogged papers can be an asset. Sometimes the fog will not appear in lith developer
    Mark
     
  14. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    Steve;

    The formulas I have are converted chloro-bromo-iodide emulisions in which only the higher contrast grades contained Cadmium. I think that they could have made the higher grades without cadmium if they could make the lower grades that way. Too bad they didn't.

    PE
     
  15. wilsonneal

    wilsonneal Member

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    Gosh I loved Portriga in the early 80's. When I was a photo student it was all we used.

    I was in the darkroom last night making mostly Palladium (with a tiny bit of Pt) prints on this new Weston Diploma paper that they're talking about in the Alt group, and it strongly reminded me of Portriga from back in the day.

    Neal
     
  16. Will S

    Will S Member

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    So should I try it in a warm tone developer (Ilford Warmtone) or Amidol? Ansco 130? I'll try the lith developer if it is fogged.

    Thanks all,

    Will
     
  17. pentaxuser

    pentaxuser Subscriber

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    In the U.K there is a law of the buyer having the right to expect goods of merchandiseable quality i.e. it does what it is supposed to do. I'd be surprised if there isn't such a law in the U.S. Worth asking the question before buying. That way you know if you have a fight on your hands even if you have the law on your side, if it is useless.

    pentaxuser
     
  18. Black Dog

    Black Dog Member

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    Forte Polywarmtone is probably the closest equivalent today, though I have yet to try Fomatone MG or ADOX Fineprint.
     
  19. climbabout

    climbabout Member

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    agfa portriga developer

    Will - I prefer dr. beers - because of it's ability to control contrast - you can go approximately 3/4 grade in each direction with different dilutions. I've also used amidol on occasion with pleasing results. I know Steve Sherma uses gaf135 with beautiful results as well. A little selenium toner to get rid of the olive cast and you get a beautiful warm tone.
    Tim Jones