Agfacolor CN17 -- process?

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by Rolleiflexible, Dec 9, 2008.

  1. Rolleiflexible

    Rolleiflexible Member

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    I have five rolls of Agfacolor CN17
    with a 1967 expiration date. Does
    this film process in C-41 or does
    it require special treatment? Any
    suggestions as to using it would
    be most appreciated.
     
  2. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    It requires Agfa's own process, I do have the formulae. It can't go near C41 as the emulsion isn't hardened for it and some it would come off the base during processing causing a major contamination issue.

    If you want to try it I can copy the formulae for you.

    Ian
     
  3. Rolleiflexible

    Rolleiflexible Member

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    Ian, thanks for the offer, but I've
    not attempted color processing --
    I run thousands of rolls of Tri-X
    through chemicals but color seems
    to intimidate me, in shooting as in
    processing. :smile:

    Do any commercial labs still
    process the film? Does the
    process have a name?

    Sanders
     
  4. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    Rocky Mountain Labs will do it & charge an arm & leg :D There's also someone in the UK, it's not difficult if you have the chemistry, I just checked & my books are in the UK, I only have the CT18 fransparency formulae here in Turkey..

    It was just called the Agfacolor process, the CN17 just means Colour Negative 17┬░DIN, I did use Agfacolor a few times the prints are still excellent I preferred it to C22, but c41 came out soon after & that was just a whole new ball game.

    Ian
     
  5. Domin

    Domin Member

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    If you don't want to mix the CN17 chemistry by yourself, C41 chemistry at lowered temperature will probably work if the film is still ok.

    C41 chemistry is way different but most probably there is not much to lose in terms of color rendition or dye stability as this is outdated and old technology film. I think will be sufficient to check if film is usable at all.

    I know of two people in Poland who do process color film in Orwo process which is if I remember correctly quite similiar. But its quite far away from you.
     
  6. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    The differences between Agfacolor and C22/C41 were quite substantial, Ron (PE) could elaborate more,but the way the dye couplers worked was quite different so using C41 chemicals at a low temperature isn't likely ti be remotely worthwhile, as the dyes won't form properly.

    Anyway Sanders wants a lab who can process them.

    Ian
     
  7. Domin

    Domin Member

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    Were talking 40 years old film. It might be as well fogged beyond any usability or lost much of sensitivity. At best it makes this film artsy and collectors item at worst.

    I processed some old Orwo film in both original process and lowered temp C41 and it works. There is crossover in c41, the color rendition is peculiar but much of it goes to "properly" processed film as well.
     
  8. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    It seems like yesterday:D

    Well not quite, it was the first serious colour negative film I used, I had been processing Ferrania transparencies and E3/4.

    I guess it really depends what results you want from a film, 4 films isn't really enough to experiment. There was a thread a few months ago about processing 50's Gevaert & Orwo slide fim that was more practical because the OP had a decent amount of bulk film to experiment with.

    Ian
     
  9. Claire Senft

    Claire Senft Member

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    If one just wanted to play with this, I would guess that cutting off a frame and trying a standard b&w developer would give a silver image. Obviously, the first try would probably be well of the mark for time.
     
  10. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    While searching for something else I found this lab, they process CN17
     
  11. wogster

    wogster Member

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    I just remembered, there is a place in Saskatchewan, that might be able to deal with this, now where did I put..... ah here it is:

    Film Rescue International

    One of the issues is that Agfa hasn't made a CN17 process film in many years, so as with any long expired film, it's a gamble to get anything, if the film is already exposed then you might want to get one of these specialized labs to work their magic, if it's not exposed:

    Find an old film camera that doesn't work so well anymore, put in a nice display case with several of these rolls still sealed in the boxes if you have them, and one cassette with the leader sticking out.....
     
  12. Ken Edwards

    Ken Edwards Member

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    Agfacolor negative films made prior to the introduction off the Optima and Ultra series that could be processed in C41, were processed in a color developer which used potassium carbonate to buffer it around pH 11.0. This is higher than the pH of C41 developer, which is around 10. Also, the developing agent in C41 is based on a diaminotoluene molecule, whereas the Agfa developing agent is based on a diamino benzene molecule. The diaminotoluene-based molecule shifts the peak wavelengths of the dyes to a somewhat longer wavelength and developer activity is increased. So, if I was stuck with tweaking a C41 kit off the shelf and I had a pH meter, I would raise the developer pH to 11 and attempt processing for 5 to 6 minutes in the resulting developer, at 68F.
     
  13. foc

    foc Member

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