Ahh, D-76 - my friend, always...

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by clayne, Jun 6, 2009.

  1. clayne

    clayne Member

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    Just processed a few rolls with D-76 that was literally at the bottom of the jug, "seasoned" color. Zero issues - looks perfect.

    There's nothing new about this, but you gotta love a developer that is rock-solid and produces quality results consistently without issue.
     
  2. bobwysiwyg

    bobwysiwyg Subscriber

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    Having only recently returned to analog I heeded the advice found here, start with one film/developer and get to know it, etc. My choice was T-Max 100/400 and D-76. I have not been disappointed yet. Perhaps later I will branch out and experiment, but for now, just happy to be back. :wink:
     
  3. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    D-76 user for over 40 years some things NEVER change.
    Rick
     
  4. jim appleyard

    jim appleyard Member

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    I haven't gone as far as the OP and used the "seasoned" stuff, but I seem to come back to D-76 time and time again. If someone were to give me a roll of b/w film to process, brand "xyz", a film that I don't shoot myself, the first thing I'd do is look up a dev time with D-76. It's called a standard for a reason.