Albuquerque, NM

Discussion in 'Geographic Location' started by FM2N, Mar 25, 2010.

  1. FM2N

    FM2N Member

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    Hello All,
    My wife and I are heading to Albuquerque on April 5th thru the 9th. My wife has a job interview at UNM. What photo galleries or stores would you advise to see or go too? Also any other interesting places to see would be great. We will also be looking at places to rent any thoughts on fun or interesting neighborhoods to live in would be a great help.
    Thanks
    Arthur,NYC
     
  2. keithwms

    keithwms Member

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    It's been so loooong since I lived there, I couldn't possible give advice. I was in first grade at Monte Vista school there! All I can say is: I loved the city, the food, the nearby mountains, the balloon festival, the little side trips in the state.

    When I lived there, it was across the street from UNM. I remember some interesting adobe-like architecture. Only lived there for a year though.
     
  3. TheFlyingCamera

    TheFlyingCamera Membership Council Council

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    If you have spare time, take a run up to Santa Fe (only 2 hours drive) and poke your head in at Bostick & Sullivan. There are a number of quite fine galleries in Santa Fe, both within walking distance of the main square and on a road out of town whose name escapes me at the moment.
     
  4. billbretz

    billbretz Member

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    Arthur - Did we scare you away from Delaware?
     
  5. FM2N

    FM2N Member

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    No it is still on the list. We went and had a very nice time.
     
  6. Jan Pietrzak

    Jan Pietrzak Member

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    Arthur,

    Abq is a fine city to live in. Keith still has fond dreams of Abq and Scott remembers that Santa Fe is 2hrs away, well when you live in DC every thing is 2hrs away. Sorry Scott. Santa Fe is 50/60 miles north/east and an hour away. We do have this new thing called the RailRunner from SF to Abq. So living in Santa Fe is not that bad. Coming form So/Cal that just got us into LA. Life is a lot slower out here, so it will take some time to get ust'ed to it. UNM is a good school (to bad we got knocked out of the NCAA play off. (???next year????)

    So come on out the New Mexico

    Jan Pietrzak
     
  7. RidinRev66

    RidinRev66 Member

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    Local Camera Stores

    We have two local camera stores in Albuquerque with locations about 1 mile east of the University.
    Kurt's Camera Corral, 3417 Central Ave. NE
    camera & darkroom, 3225 Central Ave. NE
    Both have competitive pricing, but not as low as the Big Boxes. However it is worth keeping these businesses selling cameras and processing! Check them out if you have time.
     
  8. mark

    mark Member

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    Photograph in old town or head to the sandias. Head west out of the city to get great city shots at dusk. Eat breakfast at little anitas, and dinner at Gardunos. I really like ABQ. If you have timreams are going to Santa Fe continue on to Chimiyo(sp). I am not a huge fan of Santa Fe but the surrounding areas are very pretty.

    Have fun.
     
  9. takilmaboxer

    takilmaboxer Member

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    At this time of year, be ready for the Spring winds, which can reach 50 mph and blow the dust six feet off the ground. Typically, windy days alternate with picture perfect sunny days. Your cameras should be well protected from the wind and dust.
     
  10. Joe VanCleave

    Joe VanCleave Member

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    For living, the Nob Hill area is interesting, as is east downtown ("Edo"). Both are close to culture and nightlife. A bit expensive, however.

    For landscape photography sites, pretty much the entire state. Close to Albuquerque, visit the Ojito Wilderness, on public BLM land. Drive north on I-25, exit at Bernalillo onto hwy 550, take 550 about 20 miles north/west, and just before the road bends around to the right into the village of San Ysidro, take a left off the hwy onto Cabezon Road, a dirt road. You'll need a truck/SUV, should be fine in dry weather. Lots of interesting scenic landscapes; dry, desolate, other-wordly in places.

    Tent Rocks is also interesting, near the pueblo of Cochiti, on I-25 between Abq and Santa Fe.

    Or take I-40 west to just about Grants (about 70 miles), then go south (can't remember the highway number) to the Sandstone Overlook at the El Malpais National Monument.

    Of course, there's also Chaco Canyon, a day-trip from Abq.

    For galleries, Santa Fe has several notable photography places, among them the Andrew Smith Gallery. Check out "THE" magazine, a free rag (but done well), for lots of info on the Santa Fe arts scene.

    ~Joe
     
  11. TheFlyingCamera

    TheFlyingCamera Membership Council Council

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    Jan- it's two hours from the airport, if you factor in getting-lost-as-a-tourist time and return-the-rental-car time :smile:
     
  12. Jan Pietrzak

    Jan Pietrzak Member

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    Scott,

    You have never driven with my wife have you. In SoCal we lived in the foothills above Glendale not far from the 2 and 210. I would leave the house before 6:am to teach a 9:am class at Santa Monica College most of the time I made it. Oh, and that was only 37 miles away. Like I say NM/Abq/SF its a whole lot slower. I may have to go into town, first time this week.

    The only down side is the 18 to 20 inches of snow and ice on the north side of the house. We had a nice winter. The last shot was last fri/sat with 8 to 10 inches, it was gone by Sunday.

    Jan Pietrzak
     
  13. adrianholgaguy

    adrianholgaguy Member

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    Since you are going to be on campus anyway - you should probably stop by the Museum of Fine Art in Popejoy hall. They often have photography from the permanent collection up. If you call ahead, I believe you can still make arrangements to have them pull prints from their collection. This is pretty interesting if you are interested in photo history because the bulk of the collection was donated by Beaumont Newhall or Van Deren Coke. If it's important and from the 19th century, the UNM art museum had a copy.

    As a grad of the UNM photo program, I am biased - but it's worth a walk through of the art department. Ask at the front desk where the art department is. If the photo lab is open, it's a nice facility, and sometimes there is student work on the halls nearby. You might also check the John Summers gallery in that building, sometimes there is an MFA show up there worth catching.

    If you've never done so, walk out of Popejoy, across Central, and stop at the Frontier. It is a real dive, but kind of an Albuquerque tradition. Ask for a Frontier roll. If you get lunch, eat the Frontier roll before your food comes, otherwise it sort of congeals and isn't nearly as awe-inspiring. The Frontier attracts a wild and wooly crowd - from local news anchors to street kids and a lot of university students. If you are moving to albuquerque soon, it will be part of your life, go on in and get to know it. Also, it has one of the best collection of John Wayne paintings known to mankind. If you want good food, not strange ambiance, eat your frontier roll and go south a block and west a block and look for the El Patio - I think it is still in operation. Good, traditional new mexico food. Get lots of green chile.

    Downtown has exploded since I lived there - it is worth getting out of your car and walking, or a late night trip to the bars if you do that. there is a good gallery downtown - Ralph Green Gallery? - that sometimes has photography.

    Nob Hill and Ridgecrest are great neighborhoods if you work at UNM - it's almost walkable. The area around the Harwood Gallery and Studios (also worth a visit, but not a lot of photography) has become really gentrified in the last few years - it is beautiful, but it used to be a good neighborhood to have all of your possessions stolen in. The North and South Valleys are amazing and historic, and sometimes a little dicey. If you live in the Northeast Heights, and you choose the location carefully - you can be hiking in the sandias in 10 minutes from your door.

    The real action for photography is in Santa Fe. Definitely stop at Bostick and Sullivan, if you have any interest in Non-Silver processes. they are friendly and generous with information. The College of Santa Fe has recently changed names, but they had an amazing photography building with a very contemporary gallery. In my experience, if you go when school isn't in session, it will be absolutely dead and you will be the only one there. However, I have seen simply phenomenal work and I always stop. I would call ahead and get the building hours if you are going up. Also not to miss is Photoeye books - look them up on line and get directions or use a GPS - people in santa fe mostly drive by intuition and if you have never been, you will never find the place. Photoeye is the largest collection of photography books in the known universe. There is also a gallery in another building - in the 90's it showed Jock Sturges *a lot* - but seems more diverse lately. There is a good coffee shop between the bookstore and the gallery, and it is usually my first stop because there aren't a lot of publicly accessible bathrooms off canyon road. Canyon road is right near photoeye and is the main gallery district in Santa Fe - not a lot of photography, but it is worth losing an afternoon if you can afford it. Also in Santa Fe is Site Santa Fe - not a lot of photographs, but it tends to draw international art stars - think venice biennale - and never disappoints. Also on the plaza is the Andrew Smith Gallery and in recent years there is a gallery specializing in photojournalism a few blocks south of Andrew Smith.