Almost too embarressed to ask this - what do I do with exposed film?

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by rc51owner, Apr 18, 2011.

  1. rc51owner

    rc51owner Guest

    Hey Everyone,

    so I have just started taking pictures with my new-to-me Hasselblad 501C and have exposed one film. I removed it from the film back but don't know what to do with it. It isn't like 35mm film with its own canister. :smile: Do I use an elastic band to keep the roll tight? Do I put it in an old sock and keep it in my sock draw until I am ready to get it processed? I really don't know.

    Regards,

    M
     
  2. hpulley

    hpulley Member

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    Usually there is a little paper band that you either lick and stick or with Fuji you peel and stick. That holds it together so it doesn't get light leaks. If the paper band comes off then a rubber band will work fine. No need to put it in a sock or drawer, the backing paper keeps it light tight but you can put it in its film box if you're paranoid about it.
     
  3. tomalophicon

    tomalophicon Member

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    It is a good idea to keep it out of direct sunlight. I usually thrown them in the camera bag until I'm ready to develp them.
    Yes there is a lick and stick tab usually.
     
  4. brucemuir

    brucemuir Member

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    Freestylephoto.biz actually sell a black plastic canister made by Maco for keeping your 120 film light tight.

    I like them and buy a few every time I make an order there.
     
  5. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    As said by others, there should be a thin band of paper at the end of the roll. This paper is gummed on the back. Lick it and it will become sticky. It will keep the film from unrolling on its own. If I am not processing the film any time soon, I usually keep them in black light proof bag. It probably isn't necessary but that's what I do.
     
  6. Curt

    Curt Subscriber

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    It's a one shot camera, keep the film and send me the camera.

    Just roll it up and stick or lick the tab and if it seems that the paper is a little loose then a rubber band is good or a piece of tape. Just don't leave it out in the open sun etc..
    It'll keep just find until you get it developed or develop it yourself.
     
  7. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    A small plastic or padded case is a good idea - the rolls are somewhat vulnerable to rough handling. You can find special purpose plastic cannisters (I have a few black ones) but I'm told that there are clear "M & M" holders that do just as well.

    The cardboard "Pro-Pack" boxes hold 5 exposed rolls just as effectively as unexposed film.
     
  8. hpulley

    hpulley Member

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    After developing some exposed rolls left like that for 50 years I think they're more light tight than people realize... And tougher too, the gelatin on base is actually pretty resiliant stuff in its paper backing as long as it is tightly wound onto the spool.
     
  9. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    Hi, I use the little band on the film, or a piece of tape or a rubber band if I have lost that. Then, once they are home, I throw them all in a jumbo-sized Ziploc and put them in the fridge until I have about 300, then go on a processing binge. Before I get home, I keep them in pro pack boxes or my pocket, and always plastic bags in case of some sort of a spill. I use as many canisters as I have. Adox CHS films are worth buying just for the free canisters that come with the films IMO. At any rate, the important things are to keep them cool, dark, and dry.
     
  10. polyglot

    polyglot Member

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    Like everyone says above, but beware rubber bands. If left on there long-term, they can cause a stress imprint in the film that will be visible in the image. But since you're going to develop it within a few days (right!?) it won't be a problem.

    I bought (for 50c!) a roll of exposed 120 film that was approx 45 years old. It was still light-tight, not that it really had any images left on it.
     
  11. markbarendt

    markbarendt Subscriber

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    No reason for embarrassment, we were all there at one point.

    It took me a while to understand that I needed to fold back the paper a bit to make the lick and stick tape work.
     
  12. JBrunner

    JBrunner Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    After lick n stick or peel and stick I put mine in a ziplock bag. I've had more trouble with dirt fron them rollong around loose than anything else. And don't be embarrassed. Nobody was born with MF film licking procedures as instinctual behavior. Well, maybe Callow.
     
  13. frobozz

    frobozz Subscriber

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    It's weird, though. After having not shot medium format in about 30 years, that whole motion came back to me immediately when I finished the first roll in my Mamiya 645! It's the peel-n-stick I can't get used to. I want to lick the thing... (Actually I lick my thumb, then use it to moisten the paper and roll it tight, all in one move.)

    Duncan
     
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  15. bblhed

    bblhed Member

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    Lick it and stick it, if you really don't trust that you can put it into an M&M's minis container (after eating the M&M's) and keep it in there until you are ready for processing.
     
  16. jerry lebens

    jerry lebens Member

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    It's never occurred to me before but I knew more about handling 120 films than 35mm films, when I started studying photography seriously. My parents had a Box Brownie when I was young, so licking and sticking seemed normal. It was those pesky little 35mm things that left me feeling inadequate...

    Hands up those who can actually identify the brand of film from the taste of the glue. I used to like the slightly medicinal flavour of Agfa films.

    Regards
    Jerry
     
  17. Chirs Gregory

    Chirs Gregory Member

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    I happened to be dealing with my first 120 roll outside when it started to rain. My finger was slightly damp and it stuck to the paper leader, so I figured it out from there. I still slapped a little tape over the end in case my "intentionally sticky paper" hypothesis was proven false, but now I'm not so paranoid. If I knew I was going to be waiting more than a week or two, I'd probably invest in a black Tupperware container for fridge storage, but even then I wouldn't sweat it.

    While 35mm film is much easier to deal with while shooting, I've found that 120 wins hands-down for darkroom purposes. My old plastic reels never bind on it, and because of the weight and size it tends to lay much flatter than 35mm as well.

    2F/2F: 300 rolls? As in 3 with two zeroes after it? I couldn't wait that long if my life depended on it! I absolutely have to know how it turned out immediately.

    I started out on 110 cartridges and Polaroid pack film, so I have absolutely no idea how I ended up playing with MF. I guess I should have graduated to Minoxes and exotic large-format backs.
     
  18. mpirie

    mpirie Subscriber

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    Talk about feeling dumb? Not long after I started my formal photography training, I asked my tutor why the 120 rolls had lick and stick tabs? He told me that it was to stop the paper and film from unrolling and if i paid particular attention the next time I finished a roll, I'd notice that FP4 tasted of mint, PanF tasted of strawberries and HP5 tasted of banana. This was so that you could tell the film type in the dark!

    You can imagine my disappointment (not to mention embarrassment) when I found out he was joking!

    Jerry - yes, having had the joke above played on me, i can often tell the flavour of the adhesive used :D

    Mike
     
  19. Thomas Bertilsson

    Thomas Bertilsson Subscriber

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    For me it's essential to process right away, or I'll forget exactly what was on the roll, and even though I make notes on each roll, that doesn't always cover adequately what the lighting conditions were like and how I subsequently change my processing technique to get the most out of the film.
    It's been a while since I had a film backlog... For that very reason.


    To the original poster: Your question has been answered a zillion times, and the only thing you HAVE to do, to minimize the risk of destroying your film, is to seal it with the 'lick and stick' tape as mentioned (or in the case of Fuji film, 'peal and stick', as they have adhesive that is sticky without licking), and then preferably keeping it in a cool and dark place until you process it. The sooner after you expose the film you process it, the better your results will be.
     
  20. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    300 rolls was an exaggeration to be funny, but I do have at least 80 in the fridge at this moment, plus about 30 rolls of 35mm and over 100 sheets of 4x5. I work a lot and go to school, so it is hard to find a whole day to devote to it...and I don't like to even start if I cannot devote a whole day. Anything with a pressing need to be developed goes to a lab.
     
  21. jbbooks

    jbbooks Member

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    Odd, that you did not notice the sticker. Did you do what I did the first time I tried loading a Hasselblad back and get it reversed? If so, then that would explain why you have a question as to how to keep it from unrolling. :smile:
     
  22. xya

    xya Member

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    perhaps I'm a miser, but (after licking and sticking) I put the rolls into the empty package of the next film. I open them cautiously at one end. no need to buy containers, boxes or so. after 40 years of practice one doesn't even think about it. works for 35mm as well.

    kind regards

    reinhard
     
  23. darkprints

    darkprints Member

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    I don't see this on their website. They do have them for 35mm, but not 120
     
  24. polyglot

    polyglot Member

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    Or if you buy Adox film in 120, it comes with the canisters! No need to buy 'em separate.
     
  25. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    Yep, and the Adox canisters are preferable IMO. Simple design with a pop cap. Not some weird space-age looking bulky corkcrew thing.
     
  26. Sparky

    Sparky Member

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    WOW. Since when did people START their photographic education shooting with hasselblads...?? It wasn't that long ago in my memory when you had to take a second mortgage on the house to get one... guess times have changed.