Alternative processes for negatives?

Discussion in 'Alternative Processes' started by wilfbiffherb, Nov 23, 2011.

  1. wilfbiffherb

    wilfbiffherb Member

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    This is going to sound potentially stupid but are there any alternative processes to make negatives as opposed to prints? i have seen many amazing photos using many laternative processes but they all seem to be done at the printing stage. I dont have a darkrooma bu develop my own film at home so was wondering if there are any processes just for creating negatives at all?
     
  2. Jerevan

    Jerevan Subscriber

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    Not sure exactly what you mean but calotypes, collodion process, the dryplates comes to mind as "alternative" for making negatives today.

    Have a look at http://www.thelightfarm.com/ for some (a lot!) of info on dryplates for example.
     
  3. wilfbiffherb

    wilfbiffherb Member

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    thanks for the link. sorry, i wasn't being too clear. i'm basically asking if there's anything processing i can do to my negatives apart from the usual c41/e6
     
  4. Ottrdaemmerung

    Ottrdaemmerung Member

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    Since exposed film has to be developed in a way that makes the negs viable, options are severely limited. Alternative processes are better done in the printing stage. However, you can still try developing film in "alternative" chemistry, like cross-processing E6 in C-41, or developing B&W or C-41 in Caffenol.
     
  5. jp498

    jp498 Member

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    For regular negatives, you've got a ton of options with traditional B&W film. it's really overwhelming. Go to the digital truth massive development chart, and check out the developer option list. This is actually about half of what's commonly available to process B&W film. The other place to check is photographers formulary, where they make lots of old and obscure and modern developer variations. One could spend the rest of their life testing developers instead of shooting if they wanted. Film is developed easily without a darkroom. You just need a dark place or purpose made bag for unreeling the film from the rolls and putting it into the development reels.