Anti-solarization in a can

Discussion in 'Alternative Processes' started by Mateo, Nov 13, 2004.

  1. Mateo

    Mateo Subscriber

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    I was looking at the archives at the Alt-Photo-Process-List and came across this thread: http://duke.usask.ca/~holtsg/photo/current/0257.htm. So I jumped up and grabbed a can of Krylon Crystal Clear Acrylic Coating 1303 and a throw away palladium print and went outside to spray it. Wow. The print I used was overprinted and outside the negative area was badly solarized but just one coat and the solarization was gone. Brown became black. The Dmax also improved, not a huge jump but definitely noticeable.

    There were a couple of other new discoveries for me also. The shadow areas that were blocked up suddenly had separation and new life. So I started grabbing another overprinted print and before I coated it I put it up to a lamp to look at it transmission style. It had all kinds of great seperation in the shadows that just blocked up in reflected light. I sprayed it and it came to life. Anybody else do this?
     
  2. photomc

    photomc Member

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    Very interesting, I have not tried this with any of the Zia's but I have used the same stuff on some Polaroid Transfers and the difference for me was pretty much the same. Now these were color, so what I saw was a BIG difference in the color saturation - which I would think would match what you have described.

    Funny thing, was wondering about the same thing last week. Thanks for the information, will give it a try on some - 'less than satisfactory' Zia's
     
  3. Jorge

    Jorge Inactive

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    I tried the gelatin over the print method and it helped a little, I suspect in the same manner as the Krylon spray, but it was not the same as the wet look. I would be concerned about the archival properties of the krylon. Keep the prints you coated around your house and check that they do not yellow out after a few months.
    I suppose this is the holy grail of all pt/pd printers, to find a way to preserve the wet look. I dont think it is necessary to do this. A good negative will show great contrast and detail. Certainly the print you sent to me did not required any sort of treatment, it is great as it is.
     
  4. bmac

    bmac Member

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    Have you guys tried using Lascaux Fixativ? I use it on my digital prints (GASP!). The reason I ask is that it has been proven to be a neutral color non yellowing overspray that is archival. It runs about $20 a spray can here locally.
     
  5. sanking

    sanking Restricted Access

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    What is Lascaux Fixativ? Acryllic, polyurethane, ??

    My own experience with Krylon Crystal Clear Acryllic has not been very positive. I can see some increase in Dmax and shine but I did not find it worth the trouble, especially considering the fact that it introduces archival issues. I know the stuff has a UV inhibitor and is not supposed to yellow, but who knows for sure.

    The only thing I have found that can give some definite zing to the print is waxing with a product such as Gamblin or Renaissance. Products like this have a rather long history of use in painting so I tend to think they would be resasonably safe with a photographic print.


    Sandy
     
  6. donbga

    donbga Member

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    Sandy,
    How do you wax with Gamblin or Renaissance? Do you have a preference?

    Also this weekend I'm going to do some rod coating tests with Hydrocote Polyurethane. I'll scan the print to show a before and after.

    Don Bryant
     
  7. bmac

    bmac Member

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    http://www.lascaux.ch/english/malhilfen/lacke_fixativ.htm

    Lascaux Fixativ is a transparent, pure, thermoplastic, acrylic resin fixative whose high quality has been tried and tested in many fields including art teaching, graphic and fine art, printing, bookbinding and architectural draftsmanship.
    It has proven successful for many uses, especially for conservation. Lascaux Fixativ is suitable for fixing pencil, charcoal, pastels, wax crayons, watercolours, Indian ink, tempera, photos, lithographs, art prints, rub letters, gold leave, blueprints etc. It can also be used as a final sealing for Lascaux Aquacryl.
     
  8. sanking

    sanking Restricted Access

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    I prefer Gamblin because you can use it right out of the can without heating or mixing. Just put some on a old T-shirt or pair of underwear and rub it over the print. Then take a clean rag of the same type and buff the print. Finish off by buffing with some kind of fine hair buffing brush.

    Looking forward to hearing of your experience with Hydrocote Polyurethane. Hope you give us a good write-up if it works well.

    Sandy