Any hints about the Nikon F6

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by roteague, Aug 24, 2007.

  1. roteague

    roteague Member

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    Well, I've got a new Nikon F6 coming in on Monday. I was wondering if anyone who currently uses one has any hints about it. I heard a few things about loading film in it, but can't remember where I saw it.

    TIA
     
  2. copake_ham

    copake_ham Inactive

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    Robert,

    Can't help you out - but do tell us what you think once you start shooting with it.

    Not sure how much longer Nikon will be making film gear. They just announced the D3 (virturally a full frame sensor) and D300 (not) - so the F6 is likely to be the last in a long line of great film SLRs.
     
  3. Dinesh

    Dinesh Subscriber

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    Don't leave alone around those ULF guys at the conference. All they will do is mock it's tiny negative size and make it feel inadequate. :tongue:
     
  4. Craig

    Craig Subscriber

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    Loading film can be tricky the first time, I found it seems to work best to slide the top of the can in first and then push the bottom into place. There is a little nub at the top of the film chamber that prevents the canister from just dropping in.

    I found that occasionally I bump the switch that controls the focusing pattern, so you might want to check that occasionally, so you're focusing where you think you are. I've missed a few shots because the switch moved.

    After a few long flights the vibration of the plane loosened the screw that holds the rewind knob on, I noticed when it came loose and the knob wobbled on me when rewinding. I carry a small screwdriver for my glasses, and that worked fine to tighten it up. I should put a small drop of Loctite on it to hold it in place.

    Otherwide, it's a great camera. I think it fits in my hand better than any other camera I used because it's a bit smaller than other F series Nikons with motordrives. A plain F4 (not an F4S or F4E) is similar in size, bit not as comfortable. The AF is leaps and bounds ahead of the F4.

    One thing I do like is the ability to print the exposure and date data between the frames of film. It does slow down the drive speed if that's important.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 24, 2007
  5. Medusa83

    Medusa83 Member

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    I agree about loading thhe film it takes a little getting used to. Once when I was loading I pushed in one of the DX sensors and it didn't read my asa correctly. Besides that it is a wonderful camera very easy to get accustomed to. I also like the imprinting between frames of shooting data.
     
  6. kram

    kram Member

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    Does anyone know why it has the plastic bump which makes film loading more tricky than it should be? Bring back the Pentax 'Majic needle' system; so simple, so neat.
     
  7. Craig

    Craig Subscriber

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    No idea what that bump is for. When I got the camera I called Nikon professional services ( or somethign like that) and spoke to a technician and he said not to remove the piece. Instead he told me of the easier way to load film and that has worked well.
     
  8. roteague

    roteague Member

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    That seems to be similar to the way the F5 loads.

    That is kind of one of the downsides for me. I have big hands and like a big camera. But, I ordered an MB-40 grip to go with the camera (even that was expensive). Even on my D200 I have the battery grip.
     
  9. copake_ham

    copake_ham Inactive

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    Just a note. The "bump" is also on the F5. It can make things a bit frustrating - particularly when trying to change rolls of film "on the fly" so to speak.
     
  10. Craig

    Craig Subscriber

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    It's still not small, just smaller. I've never used an F5, but it is more comfortable than an F4. The grips just seem to fit my hand perfectly. I found an F3 with the MD4 to be comfortable as well, but this is a different sort of camera. If I had to choose two Nikon bodies to use, It would be an F6 and then an F3 in that order.
     
  11. roteague

    roteague Member

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    I have to admit, I've never seen an F6. I love my F5, love its feel and the way it handles.
     
  12. Craig

    Craig Subscriber

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    It was the feel that sold me. I've known the owner of the local camera store for years, and when The F6 came out he handed me the store demo model and told me to go shooting with it for the day.

    Good move on his part, I was sold halfway though the first roll. I brought it back as soon as I finished the roll and bought one.

    I'll be curious about your serial number and what they are up to now. Mine is barely into 4 digits.
     
  13. copake_ham

    copake_ham Inactive

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    Robert,

    I have to say that you're renewing my faith a bit here today.

    Last night, after a birthday dinner and concert for my wife we took a stroll over the Brooklyn Bridge. It was a pleasant evening and a few thousand other folk had the same idea - most tourists but what do you expect.

    Anyway, I saw an innumerable number of digis - P&S's and dSLRs etc. and nary a film camera amongst them.

    Then, at home, I read the article in the NY Times about the new D3 and D-300 and go to sleep thinking it's all over for 35mm film.

    Then, I read your thread today and realize that there's at least one guy out there today who's willing to plunk some money down on a new F6! Makes me feel a whole lot better.

    Enjoy it!
     
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  15. Craig

    Craig Subscriber

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    If you think that an F6 can do everything that a top end DSLR like a D2x or EOS IDs can do and the only difference is the capture medium, but the F6 is 1/4 the price, it really looks like a bargain in comparison.
     
  16. roteague

    roteague Member

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    Thanks George, I'm looking forward to working with it and seeing what I can get out of it. I'll be picking up a roll of color negative film to try it out with - I just don't have enough time to shoot Velvia and get it processed on the mainland, before I leave on vacation. I'll post something in the gallery after I do.

    I work with one guy who does surf photography, and he can't understand why I would spend $2000 on a 35mm film camera. I've offered to teach him how to use a film camera, but he hasn't said whether he will take me up on the offer or not. :tongue:

    I thought a lot about buying one, considering my major focus is 4x5. But, I just figured that if I don't get one now, I may never be able to (rumor: F6 has been discontinued). I do need something for travel photography, and the F5 can now be a backup camera. I'll do a writeup on the camera on my blog sometime in the next couple of weeks.
     
  17. luvmydogs

    luvmydogs Member

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    Robert, enjoy your new camera! I have a F6 as well and it does feel amazing in my hands. Though nowadays I use mainly manual cameras, the F6 can't be beat when you need a fast, capable, rock-solid 35mm.
     
  18. Shawn Mielke

    Shawn Mielke Member

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    Don't know exactly what you like to shoot but the F6 is it for (initial) size and sophistication in the 35mm world. Congrats.
     
  19. Tom Stanworth

    Tom Stanworth Member

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    I remember reading that it is very similar to the F5....some referred to it as more of a review model rather than very different (as teh F5 was over the F4)
     
  20. roteague

    roteague Member

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    Well, my F6 came in today. I'm very surprised how small it is. In fact, it is way too small for my hands. Fortunately, I've got an MD-40 coming tomorrow, which should solve that problem. The advantage is that I can put the MD-40 in my luggage when traveling, with the camera being so small carrying it on the airplane won't be too big of an issue (it seems to fit my Crumpler bag just fine).

    Other than size, it has a nice feel, the rubber feels quite solid and grips well. The only disappointment is the camera didn't come with either a strap nor batteries (2 CR123A Lithium). So, I will have to buy both before using the camera.

    Someone asked about the serial number, this one is over 29,000.
     
  21. naturephoto1

    naturephoto1 Subscriber

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    Well Robert,

    Who told you to have such large hands. :surprised: :D

    Anyway, enjoy the camera. Too bad it doesn't come with batteries or a strap though. My Leica R8 did. I can't believe that Nikon did not include them.

    Look forward to seeing some results.

    Rich
     
  22. Craig

    Craig Subscriber

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    Good to know that they seem to have sold a number of them, mine is just over 1100.
     
  23. Daniel-OB

    Daniel-OB Member

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    Roteague
    You made very smart decision geting F6 if like photography. You have the best photocamera, you have in your hand the most complex machine man ever made in history.
    I have two F6 and I use them for my 35 mm professional work, beside three Leicas R8.
    F6 is unmatched. Its shutter and mirror will permit you longer exposure time from hand than with any other camera.
    F6 is really a special photo camera. It will require that you change your way living with it. One example:
    There is one very small pin just above film chamber (the side where rewinding knob is. That pin is out when you oppen the door. Closing the door the pin gous in signaling to the camera door is closed. When you oppening the door you have to pull the knob. When you closing the door it will get on the pin and will slide downwars due to closing mechanism. That moment the door can bend the pin and make somithing bad to the switch. That moment camera will not will req. repair (new switch). To avoid it: when you closing the door pool out the knob with which you open the door, and close the door, and release the knob, so the door will not move downward. Hope it is clear.
    This is not misdesign, it is a way to live with F6.
    Also I do not see any problem with inserting the film cassete. It is just the way of F6.
    F6 will make you many nice moments in your life.
    I use it the same as my manual R8, and all automations are there for never know. Real prifessional photo camera: reliable, accurate, good, will never-ever put you down.
    I will recomend you to get rechargeable battery for your MB40. When it comes that you have to use it you will know why.
    About the batteries. Many complain on the life of the batteries, but I think it is all OK. Do not rewind film automatically, but manually with rewinding knob. I also never turn off the button on/off to prevent overwear for some people swith it always when they shoot. My is full time on and just several times a year is off. My battery last 9-11 months (two Lithium 123), but I look before i shoot and never used motor drive.
    To make long short, all meters are OK.
    Good luck with your photography. If you are a professional photographer you got the right tool and for many things in studio and for field. As I got my two F6 Leicas got limited use.

    www.Leica-R.com
     
  24. Master_of_Reality

    Master_of_Reality Member

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    What compelled you to buy an F6??
     
  25. Master_of_Reality

    Master_of_Reality Member

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    bad question after reading page 2.. What was the best part of the camera that sold you??
     
  26. film_guy

    film_guy Member

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    Very nice camera (I read the review at Tom Hogan's website) If I had Nikon lenses this would be the ultimate film SLR I'd splurge on.