Any ideas on what this might be?

Discussion in 'Darkroom Equipment' started by LeeHoggard, May 29, 2013.

  1. LeeHoggard

    LeeHoggard Member

    Messages:
    4
    Joined:
    May 29, 2013
    Location:
    Manchester
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Just came across this and wondered if anyone here knew what it was?

    $T2eC16VHJH8E9qSEWJLIBRnQCIq(O!~~60_12.JPG

    $T2eC16NHJFwFFZ46scoSBRnQCyGJuQ~~60_12.JPG

    $T2eC16FHJGwFFY77tMu-BRnQDSZNNQ~~60_12.JPG

    It has a glass back and three bulbs inside, I'm just curious as to what it is! Googled the manufacturer and found nothing. As it says on the 3rd picture, 'Manufacturers of Photoprint Papers & Drawing Materials', I'm sure it's well before my time, whatever it is!

    - Lee
     
  2. Mike Wilde

    Mike Wilde Member

    Messages:
    2,936
    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2006
    Location:
    Misissauaga
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Might be a light designed to give even glare free illumiation to copying some smaller sizes of material under glass?
     
  3. Richard S. (rich815)

    Richard S. (rich815) Subscriber

    Messages:
    4,958
    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2003
    Location:
    San Francisco
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    It's a "Nig".
     
  4. Richard S. (rich815)

    Richard S. (rich815) Subscriber

    Messages:
    4,958
    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2003
    Location:
    San Francisco
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Probably used for this process:

    "Blueprinting is the older method, invented in 1842. The drawing to be copied, drawn on translucent paper, is placed against paper sensitized with a mixture of ferric ammonium citrate and potassium ferricyanide. The sensitized paper is then exposed to light. Where the areas of the sensitized paper are not obscured by the drawing, the light makes the two chemicals react to form blue. The exposed paper is then washed in water. This produces a negative image, with the drawing appearing in white against a dark blue background. In the diazotype method, the paper is light-sensitized with a mixture of a diazonium salt (used in the manufacture of dyes), a reactant, and an acid that keeps the diazonium salt and the reactant from reacting with each other. The semi-transparent original is placed on top of the sensitized paper, and a copy of the same size as the original is made by direct contact. Light destroys the diazonium salt. Ammonia gas or solution is used as a developer after exposure -- it neutralizes the acid and allows the remaining diazonium salt to combine with the reactant to create a blue dye. The chemicals on the paper acquire color only in the areas not exposed to light. This diazotype method produces dark lines on a white background, and is the popular method used today for reproduction of large-format drawings."
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 29, 2013
  5. AgX

    AgX Member

    Messages:
    11,900
    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2007
    Location:
    Germany
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I assume something to make contact-copies with even exposure. Original and copy material are placed in contact on that bent glass.
     
  6. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

    Messages:
    19,971
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2003
    Location:
    local
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    i wish i had a cyanotype machine!
     
  7. Hexavalent

    Hexavalent Subscriber

    Messages:
    577
    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2009
    Location:
    Ottawa, Onta
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    It's an old-fashioned display case for darkroom snacks (bread, muffins, cookies). :D
     
  8. mesantacruz

    mesantacruz Subscriber

    Messages:
    245
    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2013
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    ^^ haha...
     
  9. Gadfly_71

    Gadfly_71 Subscriber

    Messages:
    220
    Joined:
    May 5, 2006
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I'm gonna agree with Rich on this. Definitely looks like it was used to duplicate engineering drawings.

    I worked as a blueprint machine operator in the late 1980s/early 1990s and the machines we used were larger and much more complex but the basic principle was the same. Modern units would also have some sort of ammonia vapor system for developing the diazo materials. Diazo was (is?) offered as blueline, blackline, or brownline on white paper or you could get vellum materials as well (for making dupes to make more dupes). Unlike traditional cyanotype material, diazo is yellow until exposed and processed.

    A powerful UV lightsource is required so your unit might work for doing alt process contact printing. That said, keeping everything in registration while checking exposure may be frustrating to say the least.
     
  10. LeeHoggard

    LeeHoggard Member

    Messages:
    4
    Joined:
    May 29, 2013
    Location:
    Manchester
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Thanks guys, was just one of those things, I was too curious to just accept that I couldn't know what it was! A friend of a friend came by it and wanted to know if it was worth anything.

    Haha I hope everyone else is wrong and that's actually what it is, that's what I'd use it for anyway!
     
  11. AgX

    AgX Member

    Messages:
    11,900
    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2007
    Location:
    Germany
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    But beware of that muffins being burnt when switching on the illumination...