Any Pyro Amidol Lab ?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Mustafa Umut Sarac, Jul 24, 2010.

  1. Mustafa Umut Sarac

    Mustafa Umut Sarac Member

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    I use 35 mm and I have nothing to develop film or enlarge it.
    I have interesting ideas on pyro development , amidol printing technology .
    I looked to the online prints and developed ideas in my mind.
    Now I need a lab who can develop different rolls with different formulas or dilution. Than print with amidol.

    Is there such a lab or person who can do that ?

    Thank you ,

    Mustafa Umut Sarac

    Istanbul
     
  2. erikg

    erikg Member

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    This place will develop film in pyro: http://www.colorservicesllc.com/ But I don't know if they will print with amidol. Best to do it yourself if you can rent or borrow a darkroom.
     
  3. Mustafa Umut Sarac

    Mustafa Umut Sarac Member

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    Hi Erik ,

    I sent them a mail.
    Do you know their pyro developer brand ?

    Umut
     
  4. c6h6o3

    c6h6o3 Member

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    Negatives meant for enlargement don't do too well in pyro developers. Use ABC pyro for large fomat negatives to be contact printed. Pyro yields too much density for enlargement.
     
  5. brucemuir

    brucemuir Member

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    First I've heard that one...
     
  6. erin j

    erin j Member

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  7. pgomena

    pgomena Member

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    Pyro doesn't add too much contrast for enlargement, but it may produce 35mm negatives with more grain than is to your taste, especially in an 8x10" or larger print, depending on the film and developer you choose.

    Peter Gomena