any restrictions transporting c-41 and e-6 to/from US/Canadain a private car?

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by Robert Liebermann, Nov 1, 2012.

  1. Robert Liebermann

    Robert Liebermann Member

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    Hi - couldn't think of best place to post this, so:

    Yahoo, I'm moving back to Alaska after a couple long years away. My photography will immediately shift back into high-gear because I love and know AK so well.

    As you might imagine, though, getting chems is even harder there than elsewhere in the US, esp. e-6.

    So I'm ordering 3 of the gallon kits of e-6 and one of c-41 from freestyle before I leave (they don't ship them to AK!), to be delivered to me here in idaho and plan to carry them in my van when I drive up in December.

    I haven't found anything on the web about this, so asking is anybody's got any experience/advice.

    I guess I'm more concerned about the US-return than getting into Canada since the US side are always more irritating/paranoid/arbitrary/uneducated (example: my car got searched one time because the hick officer at Pt. Huron, MI just couldn't believe I'd go to Quebec just to take a camping-photo vacation).

    Anyway, I'd like to be prepared ... besides the hundreds of dollars these are costing me, if they were 'seized' for some reason legal or otherwise I don't know that I could get any via any other realistic method in AK. That could put me in a very expensive bind.

    And - if anybody has any idea of a place that'll ship chems to Alaska, I'd be appreciate that info too!

    Thanks,

    /robert
     
  2. Bob-D659

    Bob-D659 Member

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    I've had no problems bringing chemistry into Canada, never tried it going to the US.

    You can reasonably carry all the ORMD type hazmat stuff you want in a private vehicle in either country, and across the borders, the freight rules apply to commercial carriers.
     
  3. Prof_Pixel

    Prof_Pixel Member

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    I'm sure the chemicals won't like the low temperatures they might be subject to sitting in your car.
     
  4. adelorenzo

    adelorenzo Subscriber

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    I am not aware of any laws against it. I would think if everything is in labeled boxes, bags, bottles... and you have the receipt of purchase it would help minimize potential hassle.

    I'm across the border in Yukon and can vouch that shipping stuff North of 60 can be a pain.
     
  5. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    Contact the people who actually work at the border crossings and ask them your questions. Customs brokers might also know.

    Sometimes you might be forced to pay duty and taxes at the Canadian crossing, and then apply for a refund when you re-export the items. Depends on the values involved and the taxes they would attract (if any) if they were imported into Canada for consumption here.
     
  6. wogster

    wogster Member

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    According to Canadian Border Services This is part way down the page:

    In-transit travel through Canada

    If you are an American resident, you can transport goods through Canada to the United States. To simplify the clearance process, carry three copies of the list of goods you are transporting. The list should include the description and value of the goods, as well as the serial numbers (if applicable). You should pack consumable goods such as alcohol, tobacco and food in containers that the border services officers can close and seal when you arrive.

    Basically Canada Customs will put a seal on your container, when you enter Canada, US customs will inspect that seal to make sure it's intact when you return to the US.