Anyone shoot 8x10 color film? Where is it avail?

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by User Removed, Jul 31, 2005.

  1. User Removed

    User Removed Guest

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    I am taking a Color Photography course at the UofA this next semester, and I have NEVER done any color photography in my life! I shoot only 8x10 camera, so I was looking around online for some 8x10 color film...but could not find any! Does anyone make an 8x10 color film, or a better question...does anyone even shoot 8x10 color?!

    I am thinking that I will have to start shooting 4x5, I guess. :-/ I do not even know where to start thought, with what film I should be using, paper, chemicals ect.

    Sorry for the stupid, basic question. I have been shooting LF B+W for nearly 7 years now, so getting into color is like starting over from scrach for me.
     
  2. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    I have a supply of Astia from Freestyle, but I think they've sold it out, and it's becoming more of a special order item.

    That said, you should be able to find a few types of E-6 and color neg film from B&H. Adorama has more on their website than they really have in stock. Also check Badger Graphic.

    As to whether you choose to start with slide or neg film, see what the instructor advises before you stock up. 8x10" color film ain't cheap! If you shoot positive film and want to print conventionally, your only options right now are Ilfochrome or internegs (I'd go with Ilfochrome). If you shoot negative film, then there are a number of printing options that are less expensive than Ilfochrome.
     
  3. Jeremy

    Jeremy Member

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    Have you cleared shooting LF with your professor? Photography professors can be prima donnas (from personal experience) and may decide you must shoot the same formats as the rest of the class--usually 35mm and 120. Just something you might want to look into before you pony up the $$$ for 8x10 color film. If you have to go with a roll format then you can use a rollfilm back for the LF camera and still get all of the movements :smile:
     
  4. c6h6o3

    c6h6o3 Member

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    I think EPY is the best product Kodak sells (including Azo) and the best film made today. For daylight use, filter it with an 85B Wratten filter. You'll be astonished at the results. (For more than $7.00/sheet, you should expect no less!)
     
  5. Alex Hawley

    Alex Hawley Member

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    Ryan, another option is to use Polaroid color film; that is, if you can use prints vice chromes. The 8x10 size requires a serious investment in the processesor and film holders. Do an E-bay search for Polaroid 8x10 and you will see several examples.

    Second option is to get a Polaroid 545 series 4x5 holder and use Type 59 sheet film. This setup has the most flexibility. I think it would allow use of the Kodak and Fuji ready-load film packs, but I have no experience with them.

    Third option is a Polaroid 405 holder and use the Type 669 color pack film. Its the most economical way to shoot Polaroid.

    Finally, you could get a 120 roll film back. That would allow use of all the 120 films available. I have an old Calumet 6x7 holder and several rolls of film I would be willing to part with.

    My suggestion is to make sure your Professor is clear on what type of film is allowable - print or tranny. If its tranny, the 120 back would be the most economical.

    Send me a PM if you need further details.

    Alex
     
  6. ann

    ann Subscriber

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    From a prima donna photo instructor. You really need to check with the insturctor,
    can they handle 8x 10 negatives, i.e. equipment necessary for development.

    there are options, but the bottom line may lie in the equipment and set up of the lab.
    The instructor should be making recommendations as to the paper and chemicals, or does the University provide the chemicals.
    A lot of unknown questions need to be answered before you invest a lot of money in color film.
     
  7. photomc

    photomc Member

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    Ann, have never thought of you as a prima donna photo instructor...while you advice is excellent as all ways...just could not help saying something...
     
  8. ann

    ann Subscriber

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    lol
     
  9. Eric Jones

    Eric Jones Member

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    Hi Ryan,

    When I was exploring whether or not to get into LF I had rented an 8x10 camera from Calumet and shot both B&W and Color Neg over a weekend. Calumet had a full stock of 8x10 color film in various types. I personally chose Kodak 160VC. I developed them in my JOBO with a borrowed 8x10 Expert Drum using a Tetanal C-41 kit. Processing was really easy in the Expert Drum but I'm not sure about developing them in trays. I had a local lab contact print them for me as I did not have access to any color printing equipment. I never really formed an opinion though on the 4x5 enlarged to 8x10 vs. 8x10 contact printed. It was my first outing with the 8x10 and at the time did not really think about comparing them in that way.
     
  10. User Removed

    User Removed Guest

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    I have decided to contact the instructor of the class to discuss using LF in the class. I think the University can only develop up too 2 1/4" in their film processing machine. Their color enlargers are able to do up to 4x5 thought. I do have an old 4x5 camera that I could use for enlarging negatives, but I would rather stick to my 8x10 and making contact prints. There is something about an 8x10 contact print that I absolutly LOVE, so I would prefer to keep using the 8x10.

    I might look into ways I could process color negatives in another way then their automatic machine. I cannot afford to take them to a lab really.

    Thanks everyone for your help thus far.
     
  11. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    8x10" color contact prints are really beautiful. If your instructor is amenable, you won't regret making that choice. You can use the school's enlargers for exposure, since you'll need to be able to filter the light for color balance. The main thing is to figure out if the class will be working with transparencies and Ilfochrome or C-41 negs and C-prints (RA-4).

    I wouldn't process 8x10" color negs or transparencies in trays, but you might consider setting up a temperature controlled tank line with hangers or use print drums like the Unicolor drums, if you can't afford a Jobo Expert Drum.
     
  12. SkipA

    SkipA Member

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    8x10 color film is expensive. Check your local pro camera stores for old outdated stock.

    I got an incredible deal on a bunch of transparency film. I bought five 50 sheet boxes of 8x10 64T EPY 6118, two 50 sheet boxes of 8x10 64T Electronic Ouput film, and 17 boxes of Fujichrome Astia 20 sheet 4x5 Quickloads from Wolf's Camera in Dallas. It was all expired film with dates ranging from September 2000 to December 2004, but had been kept refrigerated. I tested it, and it was all perfectly good. The EPY in 8x10 is stunning.

    All togther, if the film were fresh and purchased from B&H or Adorama, I calculated it would come to $3705 dollars. I paid $10 per box, a total of $240. Amazing.
     
  13. Ole

    Ole Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    I have heard a rumor that 12x20" Portra might be available soon - at a bit over $30 per sheet...
     
  14. colivet

    colivet Member

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    From where? Will you alert me?

    Christian
     
  15. Paul Sorensen

    Paul Sorensen Member

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    You know, Ole, that you could just tape 12 4X5s together. No need to wait!
     
  16. Ole

    Ole Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    I don't use 12x20" but 30x40cm - about 12x16". Metric sizes don't splice so easily, and "Postcard format" 10x15cm is even more difficult to get hold of. But cutting down 12x20" is a lot easier!
     
  17. Paul Sorensen

    Paul Sorensen Member

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    It was a joke, little did I know that people might actually do that.:surprised: My gosh, I do learn something new every day!
     
  18. c6h6o3

    c6h6o3 Member

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    It's also the best film made in 35mm, 120 and 4x5. In 4x5 it's available in Readyloads. Buy it while you can.
     
  19. noseoil

    noseoil Member

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    Ryan, a friend who teaches architectural photography at the U. of A. has his students use 35mm Sensia from Fuji. Cheap, available and easily processed. He has them use Photographic Works on Grant road so they all have the same results from their film and development. This may not be the case with the color class, don't know. Although a bit pedestrian by your standards, you may find the "tonal range" of slide film to be a bit limiting until you get accustomed to it. You'll have about 4 stops between blocked shadows and fried highlights. If using E6 films, you will place highest values about 1.5 to 1.66 stops above zone 5 and let the chips fall where they may on the bottom.

    No, you can't beg, borrow or steal any of my 8x10 E6. tim
     
  20. c6h6o3

    c6h6o3 Member

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    Not true if the E6 film is EPY. It has about the same tonal range as Tri-X, and responds beautifully to zone system controls. I've used it successfully on SBR 9 scenes many times and it's even easier to push. It is a uniquely beautiful film.