Aperture Question.

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by Southern-Lights, Apr 24, 2010.

  1. Southern-Lights

    Southern-Lights Member

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    I noticed that when I change the aperture on a lens, that the aperture doesn't actually change until I press the shutter button. Is this normal?
     
  2. Allen Friday

    Allen Friday Member

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    If you are shooting a SLR, then yes, this is normal. The lens stays at its maximum aperture until you press the shutter so that you have the maximum amount of light through the view finder to focus. Check to see if your camera has a depth of field preview button if you want to check the effect of a smaller aperture in the view finder.
     
  3. keithwms

    keithwms Member

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    For many SLRs, particularly newer ones, it is perfectly normal. This allows you to see a bright image in the viewfinder, making it easier to focus and compose. Many cameras configured this way also have DOF preview buttons so that you can momentarily look at the effect of the aperture in the viewfinder and quickly return to the brighter view.
     
  4. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    Sadly, I can remember when this was a new feature :smile:.

    It is called "open aperture metering".

    It can be contrasted with "stop-down metering".

    If you use your camera with some specialized accessories, like a bellows for close focussing, you may find that you have to use it in "stop-down metering" mode.
     
  5. Christopher Walrath

    Christopher Walrath Member

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    MC lenses. Ah. Those were the days.

    OH LORD!
     
  6. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    Chris,

    Nothing is stopping you from setting aside your LF equipment and picking up at 35mm camera again. :wink: :wink: :wink:

    Steve
     
  7. Southern-Lights

    Southern-Lights Member

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    Okay. Thanks for the fast replies. Just wanted to make sure there was nothing wrong with my camera.
     
  8. Christopher Walrath

    Christopher Walrath Member

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    Nope. All operating as per specs. Just the DOF preview function.
     
  9. Christopher Walrath

    Christopher Walrath Member

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    Oh, I think I remember where I put them. Now, lemme see . . .
     
  10. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    This is what is meant by automatic aperture. The "auto" that you see on many older lenses was for this feature. It was a big deal when this feature was introduced! With a manual aperture, you do not have this, thus you must open up the lens all the way if you want the brightest image in the viewfinder, and then stop down before you actually shoot the picture. Some lenses (such as Pentax 67, Mamiya M645, or Pentax M42 mount) have a switch that allows you to select manual or automatic aperture.