Arches Platine & VDB - why hasn't anyone done this before?

Discussion in 'Alternative Processes' started by Kimberly Anderson, Mar 2, 2006.

  1. Kimberly Anderson

    Kimberly Anderson Member

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    Hehe.

    I am preparing to make some 7x17 prints tonight with some Arches Platine I've had stashed away for some time now. Thought I'd make some quck 4x5 tests, and they're very very nice. I have tried a LOT of other papers, but the Platine is the best so far.

    What I want to know is why hasn't anyone ever mentioned how GOOD it is?

    Is it your 'dirty little secret'? Does one have to 'climb the mountain' before finding out about it? It blows away anything I've used before, so I'm starting to wonder why I even bothered starting with anything else.

    In any case, it's all tongue-in-cheek, but I wanted to shout it from the rooftops now that I've actually used some of mine.

    Watch out...here come the 7x17's. :D
     
  2. Shinnya

    Shinnya Advertiser Advertiser

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    Hi,

    I think Platine is rather standard paper people use for Pt/Pd printing and other iron-based processes such as Kallitype and Vandyke. If you look the archive, one gets an impression that almost anyone who prints Pt/Pd uses this paper. The other option is COT320.

    The only thing is the cost. There are more economical papers which print nicely too. I would certainly suggest Platine to someone who is rather new to these processes. It simply works great.

    Happy printing,
    tsuyoshi
     
  3. gbock

    gbock Member

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    Michael,

    Platine is my standard paper for platinum/palladium. As Tsuyoshi pointed out, it's not the cheapest paper, but it's very, very nice. Some people have reported problems with black spots, but I've never had a problem. Knock on wood.

    Gerhard
     
  4. donbga

    donbga Member

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    FYI,

    It's been done, that is Platine used for other processes. Trying making some cyanotypes with it. Luckily I've never gotten a bad batch of Platine as some have reported. I've never tried gum or gum overs with it but it is a good paper for many processes.

    For alt. processes usually the first consideration is paper. Often there are good papers for a process that cost less than Platine, so more expensive doesn't always mean better. I personally prefer Platine over Cot320 as it is a little smoother to my eye and I think a little less expensive, though I keep both in stock.

    Also having a variety of papers that you are familiar with provides some versatility with how a process will look and perform. After a while you will have your favorites.

    Don Bryant
     
  5. photomc

    photomc Member

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    sssssshhh!! Michael...don't tell everything you know. Platine, COT320, Platinotype (aka Cranes Cover Stock), all nice papers...Have also found that I like Rising Stonehenge (a lot) for VDB. As the others have mentioned, it comes down to using a "good" paper...a lesson I learned from Jorge and Mateo early on, since my first venture into alt process was Ziatypes on Cranes Kid Finish...nice paper, but just a bit thin and not good for a novice to start on.

    There does seem to be some difference between Arches Platine and COT320, but not sure I could tell you what they are. Have fun....and try to keep the our secrets...
     
  6. Kimberly Anderson

    Kimberly Anderson Member

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    What side are you guys printing on? I've printed all of my tests on the 'rough' side, i.e. the side that if you read the watermark, it reads backwards.

    The 'smooth' side, the side you can read the watermark normally, looks like it has the fine screen imprint on it.

    Traditionally I have not printed on the screen side, but on the other side.

    Thoughts?

    I'll delete this thread just as soon as I milk you guys dry. :wink:

    BTW, these 7x17's are part of THIS PROJECT.
     
  7. Jeremy

    Jeremy Member

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    Michael, I also print on the "rough" side of Arches Platine, so you're not alone :smile:
     
  8. donbga

    donbga Member

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    The "right" reading side for the water mark is the "good side". Try printing on that side if you want a smoother surface after the print dries.

    Not all papers have water marks, which means you need to look at the paper grain to determine the good side. For example Cranes Cover natural white 90 has a good side but isn't immediately obvious. Inspect the paper with a loupe and mark the paper with a small check mark or 'x' in two corners diagonal to each other with a soft lead pencil (never use and ink pen to mark the paper or make notes with). Then wet the paper throughly and let it dry. You should be able to determine the smooth side easily after it dries. You can then check to see which side you marked and determine if you picked the good side correctly.

    When I cut parent sized sheets into smaller pieces I always mark the "felt" side as I've described above. That way when you are ready to work with the paper you don't have to worry about determining the good or smooth side of the paper.

    Mucking around with paper can be a time consuming chore but you will save time in the long run. I store all of my cut paper in clear bags of one kind or another with labels on the bags indicating what kind the paper is, what batch it came from and where and when I bought it. I also note if a paper has been pre-shrunk or had an acid pre-treatment or if it has had an additional gelatin sizing. These are then all stored safely in flat file cabinets.

    As I said all of this paper organization takes work but it pays off in the end.

    Don Bryant
     
  9. Kimberly Anderson

    Kimberly Anderson Member

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    Made two prints...one is slightly light, the other is slightly dark. We'll see how I feel about them in the morning.

    Interesting thing though, I noticed some bronzing on the print that I force dried the original coating, and hardly any at all on the print that I let air dry after coating.

    Hmmm....
     
  10. roy

    roy Member

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    But the images you show are not all VDB's are they ?
     
  11. photomc

    photomc Member

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    Good tips here Don....some new, some that just need to be reminded of.

    Thanks,
     
  12. Kimberly Anderson

    Kimberly Anderson Member

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    Roy,

    No, not yet. They'll be printed all VDB, Carbon, Pt/Pl or Polymergravure when the project is ready to be hung.
     
  13. Shinnya

    Shinnya Advertiser Advertiser

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    Wow,

    That sounds very ambitious...

    After I got into pt/pd and gum over, I realized that I need more time before I can take up on Carbon printing. I will give myself a year or two to these processes.

    Happy printing,
    Tsuyoshi


     
  14. donbga

    donbga Member

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    You may change your mind once you get to carbon and polymergravure. :smile:

    Don Bryant
     
  15. Kimberly Anderson

    Kimberly Anderson Member

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    I've done many carbons in the past. They are my favorite of all printing processes. But, you are right, I might change my mind! :wink:
     
  16. Kimberly Anderson

    Kimberly Anderson Member

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    Printing today on the 'smooth' side of the Platine. First print out and it looks very nice. Perhaps slightly more resolution on the smooth side rather than the textured.

    Also noticed less bronzing. Two reasons for this maybe. Today I'm using 3.5 ml of solution, yesterday was 4 ml. Today I'm allowing them to air dry w/no heat...yesterday's were force dried. Single coating on both yesterday and today.

    I think I'll play with double coating tomorrow...
     
  17. donbga

    donbga Member

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    Double coat always with VDB. Let the first coat dry before applying the second. I'm not sure of your negative size but for 7x17 3,5 ml sounds okay. Too much solution and over exposure can cause bronzing. Are you printing a step wedge too?

    Don Bryant
     
  18. Jordan

    Jordan Member

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    This is an awesome tip. I bought some Platine a few weeks ago but hadn't had the chance to print VDBs on it yet. Gonna do that next weekend.