Arduino for developing film

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by MFstooges, Sep 13, 2012.

  1. MFstooges

    MFstooges Member

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    Has anybody ever seen arduino project for making automated tank agitator? I am not familiar with arduino but people seem to make everything out of its code now. I saw a project to stabilize the chemicals temperature but that;s it
    It will be nice if there is a DIY project so I can put the film in the tank and let the machine do the agitation while I watch TV.
     
  2. Bill Burk

    Bill Burk Subscriber

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  3. Ken Nadvornick

    Ken Nadvornick Subscriber

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    And if the DIY approach doesn't work out, you could always try one of these:

    TAS Film Processor

    (There is a link to the User Manual at the bottom of the page.)

    Ken
     
  4. polyglot

    polyglot Member

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    You could do it pretty easily with an Arduino and a large servo for flipping the tank over. You'd be looking at investing in a lot of plumbing and annoying mechanical stuff if you wanted the controller to automatically fill and dump the chemistry at the correct time. If you're interested in it, I recommend dropping $20 on eBay for an arduino and having a play with it.

    I use the Arduino to implement my open-source f/stop timer.

    If you want a machine to agitate while you watch TV, a Jobo is a really good start. It doesn't support (semi-)stand development though, only continuous agitation. On the upside, it can use much less chemistry if you like using undiluted solvent developers.
     
  5. MFstooges

    MFstooges Member

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    Thanks! Definitely will look to small duemilanova and its implementation
     
  6. cvansas

    cvansas Member

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    What I know from this example is that it doesn't automatically pump the chemicals in the tank.

    Im currently starting a similar project for a Personal FILMLAB, but want to bring it a step further. Adruino components will be used to control a preset temperature and chemicals will be pumped into a rotary tank at the right time. The machine has to be able to run the program and automatically develop a max of 5 rolls of 35mm film, 3 rolls of 120 film, 12 sheets of 4x5" film C41, E6 and BW. Chemicals UNLIKE in the Jobo ATL processors will be pumped back in residuary tanks to be reused for further processing.

    Things are starting up now and Im currently waiting for a series of parts. The progress from design to construction can be seen on the following blog:
    http://minutephotolab.wordpress.com
     
  7. CatLABS

    CatLABS Subscriber

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    All Jobo ATL machines do all that, and have a huge amount of resources, drums and reels available...
     
  8. CatLABS

    CatLABS Subscriber

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    ALL ATL machines pump and separate the used chemistry in to "residual" collection bottles, for later "reuse or careful disposal".

    The ATL 1000/1500 have a more limited ability in that they need a special attachment to do that.
     
  9. CatLABS

    CatLABS Subscriber

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    all that said, welcome to the club of aspiring film processor makers. There are about a dozen threads with the same concept as your suggestion (with slight variance between them), though non, to date have actually done anything of the suggested plans.

    As with all of those, and this in particular - i think its a great idea (albeit redundant in light of a product that does all that and is already in existence) and wish you good luck and look forward to seeing your creation in real life!
     
  10. mweintraub

    mweintraub Member

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    I've joined a local MakerSpace group that has a robotics group and many other DIY machines including a laser cutter and 3D printer. I'm taking an Arduino "class" tomorrow and now I'm thinking of doing some sort of device to help me process film. I'm not looking to automate the entire process, but something to help create a consistent process would be great.
     
  11. polyglot

    polyglot Member

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    Have a look at the Arduino forums and specifically at the PID library and accompanying article. For temperature control I would recommend having a look at digital sensors like the DS1820 to start out; getting better accuracy will cost you. Simplest/safest heater-element control is a pre-assembled relay system like powerswitchtail.

    See also the f/stop timer linked in my signature :wink:
     
  12. mweintraub

    mweintraub Member

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    polyglot,

    Yes, I've been looking at that sensor actually. I found it pretty cheap.

    I just watched this and got my juices flowing with ideas.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2GS0OVcAA3M

    I'm new to hardware design/development, but not software development. I can't wait for the intro Arduino class tomorrow and I hope it helps me understand what I need to know to get this project off the ground.

    Yes, I saw that PowerSwitch Tail device too which looks awesome. I also thought about having an all in one control unit, so I'll have to think about it.