Arista Legacy 100 100ft rolls

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by ath, Mar 21, 2009.

  1. ath

    ath Member

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    Hello,

    has anybody tried the 100ft rolls of the Legacy 100 and can comment on the edge markings (numbering)?

    Thanks,
     
  2. PHOTOTONE

    PHOTOTONE Member

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    Are you interested in knowing the edge-markings to determine the maker of the film? I ask this, because there is only ONE b/w film maker now in Japan, and this film is from Japan, so it has to be Fuji.
     
  3. ath

    ath Member

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    No, Phototone, I know this is Acros. I'm interested in the edge markings to avoid a surprise - I've seen many different styles from nothing over 2 steps/frame to the numbering we normally see on a 35mm film (albeit with offset). And I had Rollei ATP which ran the numbers in the wrong direction.
     
  4. trexx

    trexx Member

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    Which means the numbering was in the right order on the long spool, and became reversed going into the newly spooled cassette. Likely meaning intended for another form of use then DIY respooling.
     
  5. ath

    ath Member

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    Of course you are correct. But the 100ft rool was sold for respooling - among the 35mm cassettes.
     
  6. wogster

    wogster Member

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    Doesn't mean that's what the film was made for....
     
  7. ath

    ath Member

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    Back to my question. Anyone experience?
     
  8. CuS

    CuS Member

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    I've had this happen with 100' rolls of APX 100
    - reversed numbering
     
  9. cmacd123

    cmacd123 Member

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    some folks use the long rolls for "portait" type cameras, so they would prefer the numbers to go up when the roll is unrolled, folks who bulk load would perfer they go down. The order the factory uses probaly depends on their equpment and their work flow.

    When you get a fresh roll, load a short test roll, and note the order when you process that - if needed just rewind the bulk roll before you load your cassettes. You may find that easier if you can get a 35mm split reel, but the split reel will likly require the two or three inch cores.
     
  10. wogster

    wogster Member

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    I have not experienced this, now there is another possibility, some cameras like the Canon EOS (film) series, wind the entire roll onto the takeup spool on loading, and then run backward, so the reversed numbers would be handy with such cameras. Supposedly the reasoning for this is that if you accidentally open the back of the camera, only a couple of shots are ruined, it makes sense with a completely motorized camera.
     
  11. clayne

    clayne Member

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    Huh? Never seen my 1V do this - and it's obvious from the rewind at the end that it isn't doing this either.
     
  12. BetterSense

    BetterSense Member

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    I'm pretty sure that's how disposable cameras are wound too. Saves the photofinishers time. It always made sense to me in any case.
     
  13. bob100684

    bob100684 Member

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    neither does my elan, but most rebels definitely do.
     
  14. cmacd123

    cmacd123 Member

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    It is one of the "features" of the Canon EOS rebels. Loading the film results in the camera winding to the end, and each shot counts down.
    see
    http://www.marietta.edu/~mcshaffd/macro/canonrebg.html for an explanation
     
  15. ath

    ath Member

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    For the record: I bought a 100ft roll and tried it.
    1. the numbering starts at 1, goes up to 43 and restarts.
    2. the roll is wound on a spool (bobbin-core), not a core. My Watson-style loader did not have a problem with this.
    3. the edge markings look as if they have been made by Fuji.

    A side-by-side check against fresh Fuji Acros left no doubt that this is Acros.
     
  16. perkeleellinen

    perkeleellinen Member

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    Could you tell me where you bought it from? Is there a European stockist?
     
  17. ath

    ath Member

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  18. clayne

    clayne Member

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    While there is no absolute way to prove this outside of FS - the dev times are exactly the same, the film looks exactly the same, the markers look exactly the same. Walks like a duck.

    Incredible value for what it returns.
     
  19. wogster

    wogster Member

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    I wish that other companies would use the spool rather then the core, would make it easier to switch films in a bulk loader.
     
  20. cmacd123

    cmacd123 Member

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    a metal spool is the standard way that 35mm movie film is packed on 100 ft loads. (at 90 ft a minute they make short shots)
    Kodak may still have TX and Plus X on the #417 roll. which comes on a metal spool.

    I have not seen a fuji 35mm spool, but the 16mm MOVIE spools are marked fuji film on the side and have two ofset drive holes.

    OR they may be using a Plastic spool like is used for microfilm. in that cse it may or may not say Fuji, but will have 1 and 2 marked on the sides. the microfilm spools also have the offset drive holes as well as the 1/4 inch square hole.

    You may be able to get a movie lab to sell you a few spools, and the cans ot go with them, they are a touch larger than the cans Kodak uses for plain bulk fiilm.
     
  21. Ed Sukach

    Ed Sukach Member

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    It does??? The loading must progress at a really rapid pace ... taking FAR less time than the rewinding at the end of the film.

    The theory behind this was to "save" film if the back was accidentally opened?
    When I first obtained this camera, I opened the back, not knowing that there was film loaded. ALL the film between spools was lightstruck ... not different than it would be with any other camera.

    Are you SURE about this?
     
  22. BobNewYork

    BobNewYork Member

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    The idea is that there's a decreasing amount of film on the take-up spool and an increasing amount back in the canister as you progress through the film. So, if you open the back after 30 shots of a 36exp have been taken - most of the film is protected. I guess it protects the film you've taken rather than the film you haven't.

    Bob H
     
  23. wogster

    wogster Member

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    Apparently only some of the EOS cameras do this, the Rebel series. Don't forget these are 35mm cameras, so by winding to the end and then going backwards if you open the back mid-roll you would only lose one shot ot two shors, the rest are in the cartridge. Of course the remaining film would be ruined, certain is better then losing all the shots you have taken.