Astia 100F, Sensia 3, T64 discontinued

Discussion in 'Product Availability' started by LunoLuno, Sep 5, 2011.

  1. LunoLuno

    LunoLuno Member

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  2. dreamingartemis

    dreamingartemis Member

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    Well that's crap! Why dont they try and discontinued velvia 50? oh wait they did and guess what happened? They got their ears blown out by customers screaming for it.

    But seriously, either they are consolidating their films or they are slowing closing down their film lines.
     
  3. perkeleellinen

    perkeleellinen Member

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  4. lxdude

    lxdude Member

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    Sucks.
    I use Astia for night shots because of its ability to handle mixed fluorescent lighting. Nothing else measures up to it in that regard in transparency film. I might have to go to color negative, which I don't want to do, as I don't care for the whole process that much, compared to just getting back transparencies.
    I will also miss its gentle contrast in situations where that is needed, and its better latitude. And its milder color rendition is more suitable for a lot of my subjects.
    Damn it!
     
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  5. railwayman3

    railwayman3 Member

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    To be really honest, I have to say that I fear that it's the latter.

    SFAIK, there are NO retailers selling ANY analogue products now in my area...and I'm talking 250,000+ population. :sad:
     
  6. LunoLuno

    LunoLuno Member

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    Many must have predicted larger formats of Astia would be disucontinued as well sooner or later when Fuji discontinued its 135 version, so I don't think there's no big surprise (although it really sucks!). I think most notable thing in the announcement of yesterday is that the appearance of the name of "Velvia 100F". I had always thought 100F would be safer compared to 50 or 100, but there's a great possibility that Fuji will discontinue 100F first.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 6, 2011
  7. hpulley

    hpulley Member

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    Smoke 'em while you got 'em...
     
  8. benjiboy

    benjiboy Subscriber

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    :sad: Life's a bitch, then you die
     
  9. timparkin

    timparkin Member

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    The Velvia 100F is just quickload which has already been discontinued.
     
  10. timparkin

    timparkin Member

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    I have about 1000 sheets in my freezer as this looked inevitable over a year ago when 135 and 120 were discontinued and 4x5 sheet was discontinued in the UK
     
  11. erikg

    erikg Member

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    Neopan SS too? I think it's always a bad sign when a film starts showing up at a discount. Seems to mean: "buy it now, clearance sale, stocks will not be replaced, bad news to follow" Seen this with the neopans, T64 etc.
     
  12. trotkiller

    trotkiller Subscriber

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    Neopan SS is only discontinued in 36 exp if you read carefully, Fuji's recommended replacement for it is Neopan SS 24exp....
     
  13. CGW

    CGW Member

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    They won't make what they can't sell. In my market, Fuji products have thinned out anyway, thanks to high prices and poor sales. E6 materials are fading fastest of all.
     
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  15. Athiril

    Athiril Subscriber

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  16. ColdEye

    ColdEye Member

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    I hope Acros stays for a long time.
     
  17. Athiril

    Athiril Subscriber

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    Don't worry guys, it says Astia will still be shipped until March 2012. That means there'll be enough until the end of the world in December.
     
  18. Brian Legge

    Brian Legge Member

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    I'm not familiar with SS - what is it?

    I was ready the list, terrified that Acros would show up on it. I've totally fallen for this film the last few months.
     
  19. Tim Gray

    Tim Gray Member

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    I don't think SS is readily available in the US. I think it's a traditional grain ISO 100 B&W film.
     
  20. Athiril

    Athiril Subscriber

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    Well it must be for the better. Because after all, every cloud has a silver lining.
     
  21. stavrosk

    stavrosk Member

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    I will feel depressed only if c41 film is not produced anymore whatsoever. So long as there is professional C41 film in ISO 400 and 100 I will be ok.
     
  22. A Sabai

    A Sabai Member

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    More bad news to come no doubt, but we can still shoot while we've got film and a place to process it. B+W at least will never completely dry up.
     
  23. Lionel1972

    Lionel1972 Member

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    I wonder why there is not as much concern expressed for transparency film to be find among the APUG community. Come on we need to support E6 full force, let's not let it die as we did Kodachrome. E6 is the analog process that needs it the most right now.
    In the pre-digi-devolution of the pro market, when transparencies were king, this process seemed highly regarded and the lattitude and exposure limitations didn't seem to be a valid point to prefer color neg over it. Now that the pro market has switched mostly to digital and that the mass-market of everyday people have forgotten about the experience and benefits of projecting slides, the market for E6 has shrinked dangerously. We need to revamp the concept and find smart ways to sell it to as many people as possible. Now is actually a great time to do so, with all those youngsters and new comers from the digital world starting to discover how much analog photography processes can bring to their practice and enjoyment of photography. I admire what Lomography has already achieved in promoting analog photography in a way few people could predict. I dream of someone coming up with a complete DIY at home kit for developing and viewing slides of all sizes (including 3D). They could sell it in partnership with Lomography for example: a small batch developping machine (à la Jobo ATL 1500), E6 films and chemistry, and a portable lightbox with a good loupe or any other smart new device that would be able to provide similar practical viewing experience as an iPad does. Hip and clever marketing to promote medium and large format transparencies as what they really are: one of the most awesome photographic medium ever created.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 8, 2011
  24. Hatchetman

    Hatchetman Subscriber

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    Just thought I'd share a note I got:

    Dear Mr. Fox

    Thank you for contacting FUJIFILM North America Corporation. Please allow us to assist you.

    Please be advised that the has all 1600 speed film has been discontinued. Therefore, we do not have information regarding dealers who may still be carrying this product. We are sorry that we are not able to assist you further in locating this item.

    We sincerely hope this information has been beneficial to you. If you should have any further questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact us in the future. It would be our pleasure to assist you again.

    Thank you for your interest in FUJIFILM products and services.

    Respectfully,

    Rosemary
    Authorized Customer Care Representative
    Customer Care, Imaging Division
    FUJIFILM NORTH AMERICA CORPORATION
     
  25. Klainmeister

    Klainmeister Member

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    I shoot all Fuji film, first with Neopan 400 and then Acros and Velvia 50.....but what the heck? I'm starting to get nervous. It seems like this is a really drawn out departure from the whole film scene altogether.
     
  26. Roger Cole

    Roger Cole Member

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    Several reasons. Digital display like computer projectors have replaced the hassle of slide shows. I love projecting slides but it IS a hassle. The digital version doesn't have the impact, of course, but it's so much easier and, for most people, unfortunately good enough. That's the same thing that's going on generally too.

    Second, negative films have improved tremendously. Back in the days you mention negative film could give you nice skin tones and maybe a white not-too-blue and not-too-yellow wedding dress if you were lucky, but that was about the extent of their virtues. If you were a pro who needed, say, exact matching for product shots, that required transparency film, careful lighting, test exposures with the same processing, careful filtering etc. Now that's not true either. Negative films are now very, very good, and happen to have far more dynamic range and latitude (another way of saying the same thing really) than transparency film. Finally, for we hobbyists, the disappearance of type R paper and the elevation of the price of Ilfochrome into the stratosphere have pretty much removed the reasonable ways of getting a print from the stuff at home using a totally analog process. If you want a print from a transparency now you either buy some very expensive Ilfochrome supplies and learn to print with it, including contrast masking for many images, or you scan it, one way or another - either YOU scan it or you have it scanned for output by a lab.

    I still shoot some in 35mm but only in 35mm so far. I bought a box of 4x5 because the price was right and I plan to buy a v700, but I haven't been that tempted to shoot it yet. It would look gorgeous on the lightbox but until I get the scanner what would I do with it? And once I do, I can scan it and, if I buy an expensive ink jet using expensive inks, make expensive prints that look no better than ones I can make in the darkroom on RA4 paper from negatives for much less money at every step of the process, and with more latitude and dynamic range at the same time.

    Don't get me wrong, it may not sound like it but I DO like transparency film. I just understand why it's the fastest disappearing type of film. :sad: